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97 records – page 1 of 10.

[100,000 more adults visit the dentist: a few results of November 1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73759
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
J. Grytten
D. Holst
I. Rossow
O. Vasend
N. Wang
Author Affiliation
Odontologiske Fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - psychology
Dental Health Services - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the Norwegian adult population according to: 1. number of teeth present, 2. demand and utilization of dental services, 3. travel time from home to the dentist, 4. dental health behaviour, 5. fear for dental treatment. The analyses were performed on a set of national data collected in 1989, which was representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population 20 years and above. The sample size was 1260 individuals. About 75% of the people had 20 teeth or more present. Nine percent were edentulous. Seventy-seven percent who had demanded dental services during the last year. The average expenditure for dental treatment for those who had demanded the services during the last year was NOK 826. Fifty-three percent travelled 15 minutes or less from home to the dentist. Eighteen percent travelled 30 minutes or more. Almost everybody with their own teeth present brushed their teeth regularly once a day. Thirty-three percent of all dentate people used woodsticks regularly once a day, while 20% used toothfloss regularly. Seventy-five percent had no to mild fear of the dentist, while 7% had a strong fear. Fear of the dentist was higher among women than among men. Fear of the dentist decreased by increasing age. Few people, less than 4%, had cancelled a dental appointment because of dental anxiety. There has been an improvement in dental health and dental health behaviour in Norway during the 1970's and 1980's. These improvements are discussed with special attention paid to the findings from the present study.
PubMed ID
2247358 View in PubMed
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Adult diabetic and nondiabetic subjects as users of dental services. A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215505
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
L. Pohjamo
T. Tervonen
M. Knuuttila
H. Nurkkala
Author Affiliation
Raahe Health Centre, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - economics - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis - utilization
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Utilization of dental services by 30 diabetic and 30 nondiabetic subjects was assessed by longitudinal monitoring over a period of 3 years. All subjects were examined clinically three times, and their treatment consisted mainly of cariologic and periodontal treatment. The treatment was delivered by a dentist and an expanded-duty dental hygienist. The study groups were similar with regard to the total number of dental visits needed. However, the treatment of diabetic subjects was more demanding in that more dentist's workload was needed for the diabetic group. They also missed more appointments without cancellation and therefore more office time had to be reserved for them.
PubMed ID
7610774 View in PubMed
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Adult heavy and low users of dental services: treatment provided.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275695
Source
Swed Dent J. 2016;40(1):21-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Annamari Nihtilä
Eeva Widström
Outi Elonheimo
Source
Swed Dent J. 2016;40(1):21-32
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Health Services - utilization
Emergencies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Medical Overuse - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare treatment provided to adult heavy and low users of dental services in the Finnish Public Dental Service (PDS) and to analyse changes in patients' oral health status. We assigned all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004 to a group of heavy users (n = 3,173) if they had made six or more dental visits and to a comparison group of low users (n = 22,820), if they had made three or fewer dental visits. Data were obtained from the patient register of the PDS. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and types of visits, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Both groups were followed-up for five years. Restorative treatment measures dominated the heavy and low users'treatments; 88.8% of heavy users and 79.6% low users had received restorations during the five-year period. Fixed prosthetic treatments were provided to just 2% of the heavy users and 0.8% of the low users. Emergency visits were more common for heavy users (74.8%) than for low users (21.6%) (p
PubMed ID
27464379 View in PubMed
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Attendance pattern and continuity of dental care of Finnish adults over a 5 year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241150
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1984;19(7):677-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
V. Nyyssönen
K. Herranen
M. Rimpelä
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1984;19(7):677-81
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Dental Care - psychology
Dental Health Services - utilization
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The study deals with the frequency of using dental services and continuity of visting the same dentist by adults in Finland during the 5 years up to 1981. A representative sample of 17-65 year old Finnish adults was interviewed by telephone or when this was not possible, personally. The data were collected by the Central Statistical Office of Finland in autumn 1981. Twenty-two per cent of the subjects had not visited a dentist during the past 5 years. One-third had had more than three treatment courses during the same period. The number of treatment periods increased with higher educational and professional status. Half of the subjects who had had more than one treatment period had continued to attend the same dentist during different treatment periods. Young persons had changed dentist more often than older ones. The most common reason for changing dentist was change of residence. Nine percent did not wish to continue treatment with the same dentist. Income, age, profession and region of living accounted for 10% of the number of changes of dentist.
PubMed ID
6505737 View in PubMed
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[Behavior and conditions related to denture wearing in edentulous Quebecers over 60 years of age].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103339
Source
J Dent Que. 1990 Jan;27:17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
P L Simard
R. Vallée
J M Brodeur
M. Demers
D. Lachapelle
Author Affiliation
Université Laval.
Source
J Dent Que. 1990 Jan;27:17-22
Date
Jan-1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dental Health Services - utilization
Denture, Complete - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was conducted among 367 persons aged 60 and over in order to determine the type and severity of digestive and nutritional problems experienced by edentulous elderly not wearing functional dentures. This article summarizes the information collected through an interview. The data describes the prosthetic status and experience of the elderly, their use of dental services and their methods of hygiene. In addition, information is provided on the level of satisfaction relative to their dentures and the need for repair or replacement of the latter.
PubMed ID
2394868 View in PubMed
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Carcinoma of the oral tongue in northern Finland: trends in overall incidence and patient and tumour characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10958
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 1997 Nov;26(10):480-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
S. Kari
O P Alho
K. Jokinen
K. Hyrynkangas
E. Läärä
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 1997 Nov;26(10):480-3
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Carcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - pathology
Carcinoma, Verrucous - epidemiology - pathology
Community Health Services - utilization
Dental Health Services - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Population Surveillance
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Tongue Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A population-based survey was conducted in the two northernmost provinces of Finland to describe the incidence of tongue cancer as well as patient and tumour characteristics in cases diagnosed between 1974 and 1994. A total of 105 new patients with cancer of the oral tongue were included in the 21-year study period. The age-standardised incidence (per 100,000 years) of the carcinoma in men increased from 0.6 in the first 7-year period (1974-1980) to 1.0 in the last period (1988-1994). The incidences in women were 0.7 to 1.4, respectively. The average patient profile remained much the same through the years. The median duration of symptoms also remained the same over the 2 decades, as did the median size and location of the tumour at diagnosis. In conclusion, the incidence of carcinoma of the tongue about doubled in both the male and the female population from 1974 to 1994. However, the patient and tumour characteristics remained about the same, the tumours being relatively large at the time of diagnosis in spite of well-developed community health and dental care.
PubMed ID
9416581 View in PubMed
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Causal analysis on the use of dental services among old-age pensioners in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62970
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1982 Aug;10(4):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
J. Rise
D. Holst
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1982 Aug;10(4):167-72
Date
Aug-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Dental Health Services - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health
Pensions
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the present paper was to establish and evaluate a causal model on the use of dental services in Norwegian old-age pensioners living at home. Data were derived from the Health Survey of 1975. The independent variables sex, age, education and dental status were dichotomized and arranged in this assumed temporal sequence. The dependent variable was also dichotomized into use versus non-use of dental services last year. The analysis started with the bivariate percentage table for sex and use, and then proceeded by adding one by one of the independent variables in the order of their time sequence. In this way the statistical relationship between an independent and the dependent variable was decomposed into direct, indirect and spurious effects. Dental status was the most influential determinant of use of services, having the greatest direct effect (0.40) and mediating indirect effect of the prior variables. Education came second with a direct effect of 0.18 and an indirect effect (0.11) by affecting dental status. There were only negligible differences in use rates between the age groups (less than 75 / greater than or equal to 75 years of age) when the other variables were held constant (0.05, P greater than 0.05). The greater part of the direct effect of sex (0.11) was limited to dentate persons aged 65-74 with low education. Both age and sex affected use of services indirectly through dental status (0.09 and --0.04, respectively).
PubMed ID
6956477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes of dental treatment pattern in Norway in the 1970s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75920
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1978 Mar;6(2):53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1978
Author
L A Helöe
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1978 Mar;6(2):53-6
Date
Mar-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Care
Dental Health Services - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Preventive Dentistry
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
With the aim of gauging utilization rates of dental services, a series of cross-sectional studies were performed in 1973, 1975 adnd 1977. Cluster samples of 1,600 individuals covering the Norwegian population aged 15 and above were interviewed by trained interviewers using standardized questions. The percentage of respondents who reported having seen a dentist within the last 12 months increased from 58 to 64. The receipt of tooth fillings was the predominant course of treatment and was reported by 55% of the interviewees. The percentage reporting preventive services increased from 15 to 26% at the expense of those reporting "blood and vulcanite" denistry. Fifty-two percent, increasing to 53% of the interviewers, claimed to have seen a dentist on a regular basis during the last 5 years. However, this proportion was conceivably overreported. Control questions indicated that 40-45% should be considered regular treatment attenders. Change is apparently taking place in the treatment pattern. The proportion of regular treatment attenders seems to increase by 0.5-1% per year. The treatment profile is also shifting: extractions and denture services are diminishing, preventive services are gaining, while restorative dentistry stands still - for the time being.
PubMed ID
275016 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Community use of dental care services. 2. Growth in the number of dentists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75871
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1983 Apr;87(7):249-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983

97 records – page 1 of 10.