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115 records – page 1 of 12.

Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-1981
Author
P. Baume
Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Date
Oct-17-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
PubMed ID
7321959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access and care: reports from Canadian dental education and care agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173771
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
James L Leake
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. james.leake@utoronto.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration
Dental Clinics - economics
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Education, Dental - economics
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Poverty
Abstract
Representatives of faculties of dentistry and agencies working to improve the oral health of groups with restricted access to dental care were invited to address the access and care symposium held in Toronto in May 2004. They told of their clients" sometimes desperate needs in graphic terms. The agencies" response ranged from simple documentation of the need, to expression of frustration with current trends and the apparent indifference of policy makers, to the achievement of some success in arranging alternative models of care. The presenters consistently identified the need to change methods of financing dental education and both the financing and models of care delivery to meet the needs of those with restricted access to oral health care.
PubMed ID
16026632 View in PubMed
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[A gap in the welfare. Every other low-income earner skips visits to the dentist--a public health problem is to be expected]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75749
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Björn Klinge
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. Bjorn.Klinge@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Dental Prophylaxis - economics
Health Policy - economics
Humans
Income
Oral Health
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
16610199 View in PubMed
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[Algorithmic support of the estimation of expenditures of medical services during dental treatment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193588
Source
Med Tekh. 2001 May-Jun;(3):44-8
Publication Type
Article

Canadian dentists' opinions on publicly financed dental care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153901
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2009;69(2):64-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Carlos R Quiñonez
Rafael Figueiredo
David Locker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. carlos.quinonez@utoronto.ca
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2009;69(2):64-73
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Health Services - economics
Dentists - psychology
Humans
National Health Programs
Public Sector
Abstract
The aim of this study was to inform policy leaders of the opinions of Canada's major dental care service provider regarding publicly financed dental care.
Using provincial/territorial dental regulatory authority listings, a 26-item questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of Canadian dentists (n = 2219, response rate = 45.8 percent). Descriptive statistics were produced, and bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to assess what predicts dentists' responses.
Canadian dentists support governmental involvement in dental care, preferring investments in prevention to direct delivery. The majority of dentists have less than 10 percent of their practice represented by publicly insured patients, with a small minority having greater than 50 percent. The majority would accept new publicly insured patients, preferring fee for service remuneration. Dentists generally appear dissatisfied with public forms of third-party financing.
Dentists prefer a targeted effort at meeting public needs and are influenced in their opinions largely in relation to ideology. In order to move forward, policy leaders will need to devote some attention to the influence and complexity of public and private tensions in dentistry At the very least, public and private practitioners must come to appreciate each other's challenges and balance public and private expectations in public programming.
PubMed ID
19054316 View in PubMed
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Canadian opinions on publicly financed dental care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154001
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Nov-Dec;98(6):495-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Carlos R Quiñonez
David Locker
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. carlos.quinonez@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Nov-Dec;98(6):495-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Dental Care - economics - organization & administration
Dental Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Female
Government Programs
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Inequalities in oral health and care are long recognized in Canada, with public health environments increasingly focusing on issues of equity and access to care. How does Canada publicly insure for diseases that are largely preventable, minimally experienced by the majority, but that still cause tremendous suffering among the socially marginalized? We consider this dynamic by asking Canadians their opinions on publicly financed dental care.
Data were collected from 1,006 Canadian adults through a telephone interview survey using random digit dialling and computer-assisted telephone interview technology. Simple descriptive and bivariate analyses were undertaken to assess relationships among variables, with logistic regression odds ratios calculated for significant relations.
Canadians support the idea of universal coverage for dental care, also recognizing the need for care to specific groups. Generally preferring to access public care through the private sector, Canadians support the idea of opting out, and expect those who access such care to financially contribute at point of service.
Support for publicly financed dental care is indicative of a general support for a basic right to health care. Within the limits of economy, the distribution of oral disease, and Canadian values on health, the challenge remains to define what we think is equitable within this sector of the health care system. This question is ultimately unanswerable through any survey or statistical means, and must, to become relevant, be openly promoted and debated in the social arena, engaging Canadians and their sense of individual and social responsibility.
PubMed ID
19039890 View in PubMed
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Caries extreme groups among adolescents, leaving organised dental care in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34431
Source
Swed Dent J. 1997;21(6):221-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
Y. Swedberg
H. Fredén
J G Norén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1997;21(6):221-6
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Costs and Cost Analysis
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Disease Progression
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Public Health Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was--in a longitudinal respect--to study whether 15-year-old children, in caries-free groups, and groups with high frequency of carious lesions, had a stable caries development from 15 to 19 years of age, when they left the organised Public Dental Care. Caries index values were analysed for the period 1986/7-1990/1 for patients born 1971-72 and residing in Göteborg. The groups of caries-free children seemed to be stable in their dental health in about 60-70% according to the prevalence indices used; and about 80% according to the incidence index DS-a. The caries prevalence index mean values of the 15-year-old patient groups with high frequencies of lesions showed between 1.5 to 3.5 percentile units higher mean values when the individuals were 19 years of age. However, the corresponding caries incidence index values were as low as half the size, indicating a possible treatment effect of the caries prevention programme used. Related to the DFS-a index, the 20% groups with the highest caries index values were registered for about 80% of all approximal lesions, of special interest for dental care costs.
PubMed ID
9505334 View in PubMed
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The choice of dental care sector by young adults before and after subsidization reform in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217781
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1994 Jul;39(2):291-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
S S Arinen
H. Sintonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1994 Jul;39(2):291-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Financing, Government
Finland
Health Care Reform
Health Services Research
Humans
Logistic Models
National Health Programs
Sampling Studies
Abstract
This work is a part of a project, which aims at studying the utilization of dental care by young adults and the effects of subsidization reform (SR) on it. SR was introduced in 1986 for the Finnish population born after 1960 and comprised a decrease of about 50% in the out-of-pocket price for dental care both in the public and private sector. The copayments are paid by the National Health Insurance in the private and municipalities through taxation in the public sector. In this work, the choice of dental care sector (private or public) before and after the reform and the effect of the reform on the choice are examined. The choice was measured by revealed preference; i.e. by actual choice in a period of two years before and after the reform. A random sample was drawn at the end of 1985 (before) and 1987 (after) from the population of 19-26/27 years of age in four towns, in which the conditions of supply of dental services differed essentially (n = 2250 at both occasions). The data were gathered by using a self-administered questionnaire. The method of analysis was discrete logit analysis and applied Chow-test. The changes in choices between 1985 and 1987 were counted by estimated model by using means of independent variables. The change in the choice of sector caused by the subsidization reform was marginal. The probability of choosing public sector increased 3%-points in the target group of the reform (19-25 aged), but the relative importance of different factors explaining the choice did not change. However, changes in the relative importance of explanatory factors took place in the first age group left outside the reform, but no clear picture was obtained about a possible change in the probability of choosing public sector in this group.
PubMed ID
8066507 View in PubMed
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Choices and utilization in dental care: Public vs. private dental sectors, and the impact of a two-channel financed health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170635
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Jun;7(2):99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Lien Nguyen
Unto Häkkinen
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. lien.nguyen@stakes.fi
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Jun;7(2):99-106
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Choice Behavior
Cost Sharing
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Fees, Dental
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research
Humans
Insurance, Dental - economics - utilization
Male
Private Sector - economics - utilization
Public Sector - economics - utilization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examine the determinants of the utilization of dentists' services among adults entitled to age-based subsidized dental care, using data from the Finnish Health Care Survey of 1996. We apply a three-part model to investigate the care-seeking decision, the choice of a private/public dentist, and the number of visits to each chosen dentist. Seeking care is found to be determined mainly by dentist's recall and mostly deterred by the expense of private care. Insufficient public availability and recall positively affect the choice of a private dentist, whereas income and dentist density increase the number of private visits. Need and socioeconomic variables are controlled for and are also important determinants. The findings suggest that lowering copayments and user fees and increasing the public supply of dental care, accompanied by an efficient recall system, might improve access to dental care and better steer the choice between sectors.
PubMed ID
16489469 View in PubMed
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115 records – page 1 of 12.