Skip header and navigation

Refine By

48 records – page 1 of 5.

Dental treatment of the primary dentition in 7-12 year-old Swedish children in relation to caries experience at 6 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30218
Source
Swed Dent J. 2004;28(2):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Anita Alm
Lill-Kari Wendt
Göran Koch
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden. anita.alm@lj.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2004;28(2):61-6
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - therapy
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
In most Swedish counties, epidemiological data on the permanent dentition are collected on patients between 7 and 19 years of age. However, for the primary dentition, epidemiological data are only available for the 3-6-year-old age groups. As far as we know, no studies have investigated the relation between caries prevalence in the early primary dentition and caries prevalence or treatment performed in the late primary dentition. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between dental treatment in the primary dentition of Swedish children 7-12 years of age and caries experience in the primary dentition at 6 years of age. This retrospective study is based on record data from a randomly selected sample comprising 10% of all children born in 1987 in Jönköping County (n=433). Of these children, 381 had been treated regularly at the Public Dental Service clinics between 7 and 12 years of age and were included in the study. It was found that children with previous caries experience at 6 years of age received significantly more treatment during the studied period compared to children who were caries free at the same age. The children with caries experience required a mean of 3.5 times more treatments compared to caries-free children. The present study underlines the importance of early detection and prevention of caries in the primary dentition if optimal dental health is to be expected in the late primary dentition.
PubMed ID
15272510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental visits, dental health status and need for dental treatment in a Danish industrial population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62961
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1983;11(2):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
P E Petersen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1983;11(2):59-64
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
DMF Index
Denmark
Dental Care
Dental Caries - therapy
Dental Health Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Medicine
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The purpose of the present investigation was to study the utilization of dental services, the distribution of dental diseases and treatment needs in a Danish industrial population. The study covered the male population at a Danish shipyard, and a sample of 988 workers and clerical and managerial staff was drawn by stratified random sampling. 841 persons were interviewed regarding dental visits and attitudes towards dental health services and data on dental health and treatment needs were collected. 61% of the participants aged 15-64 years made regular dental visits at least once a year. The percentages of regular visitors varied according to age and occupation, from 68 to 82% among clerical staff to 34 to 51% among workers. The mean DMF-T increased from 16.6 in the age group 15-24 to 27.0 among the 55-64-year-olds. Untreated dental decay was predominant among workers and persons never seeing a dentist, whereas there were more filled teeth and fewer missing teeth among staff and regular visitors. The periodontal status was less satisfactory in the older age groups and among workers, and most denture wearers were found in the age group 35-64 and among workers. Concordant to the findings on dental health status, dental treatment needs due to caries and periodontal disease as well as prosthetic treatment needs varied according to age, occupation and dental visits. More radical treatment types were needed in the older age groups, among workers and non-regular visitors. The present study seems to indicate that dental diseases in the adult Danish population are not under control.
PubMed ID
6635609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimating survival of dental fillings on the basis of interval-censored data and multi-state models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126757
Source
Stat Med. 2012 May 20;31(11-12):1139-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2012
Author
Pierre Joly
Thomas A Gerds
Vibeke Qvist
Daniel Commenges
Niels Keiding
Author Affiliation
INSERM, U-897, Bordeaux, F33076, France. Pierre.Joly@isped.u-bordeaux2.fr
Source
Stat Med. 2012 May 20;31(11-12):1139-49
Date
May-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Statistical
Tooth Eruption
Abstract
We aim to compare the life expectancy of a filling in a primary tooth between two types of treatments. We define the probabilities that a dental filling survives without complication until the permanent tooth erupts from beneath (exfoliation). We relate the time to exfoliation of the tooth to the age of the child and the time to failure of the filling to the duration since the treatment. We followed up fillings at repeated examinations where information is collected regarding the filling and the tooth. Several fillings can be placed in the same mouth, possibly by the same dentist. To deal with all these particularities, we propose to use a parametric four-state model with three random effects to take into account the hierarchical cluster structure. For inference, right and interval censoring as well as left truncation have to be dealt with. With the proposed approach, we can conclude that the estimated probability that a filling survives without complication until exfoliation is larger for one treatment than for the other, for all ages of the child at the time of treatment.
PubMed ID
22359322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors influencing dentists' choice of amalgam and tooth-colored restorative materials for Class II preparations in younger patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90803
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(2):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Vidnes-Kopperud Simen
Tveit Anne Bjørg
Gaarden Torunn
Sandvik Leiv
Espelid Ivar
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Blindern, Norway. simen.vidnes-kopperud@odont.uio.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(2):74-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Choice Behavior
Compomers - therapeutic use
Composite Resins - therapeutic use
DMF Index
Decision Making
Dental Amalgam - therapeutic use
Dental Care for Children - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - therapy
Dental Cavity Preparation - methods
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - methods
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Female
Glass Ionomer Cements - therapeutic use
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with dentists' decisions on choice of restorative material in children and adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 2001-2004, 27 dentists in the Public Dental Health Service in Norway placed 4030 Class II restorations in 1912 patients. The reason for placement, previous caries experience (DMFT), oral hygiene, and characteristics of the cavity were recorded. RESULTS: The most frequently used material was resin composite (81.5%), followed by compomer (12.7%), amalgam (4.6%), and glass ionomer cement (1.2%). Tooth-colored restorations were more frequently placed than amalgam in younger patients (p=0.017). Female patients received fewer amalgam restorations than male patients (p=0.006). Amalgam was more often used in patients with high DMFT (p
PubMed ID
19085213 View in PubMed
Less detail

Features of oral health care across cultures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42200
Source
Int Dent J. 1976 Sep;26(3):353-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1976
Author
D E Barmes
Source
Int Dent J. 1976 Sep;26(3):353-68
Date
Sep-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Appointments and Schedules
Australia
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental Caries - therapy
Evaluation Studies
Financing, Organized
Financing, Personal
Germany, West
Gingivitis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Japan
Norway
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
This paper sets out to draw together the findings from the five individual studies and to draw tentative conclusions from them. It is pointed out that the comparisons made are between system factors and not between whole systems of oral health care. An attempt is made to evaluate the effectiveness of individual system features in the hope of being able to suggest ways in which those shown to be most beneficial might be incorporated into complete systems. In relation to caries experience, measured as DMF teeth, there is a wide variation, not only by each of the separate components to that total. In those studies where extensive school dental services exist, the F component accounts for almost all the score while in the other study groups it forms only about half the total, the proportion tending to be greater in the non-metropolitan than in metropolitan populations. In the same way treatment/need ratios and amounts of retreatment required show the benefits of the existence of the school dental service. The treatment/need ratio is then examined in relation to selected variables such as method of payment, utilization of auxiliaries, the existence of specified target groups etc. When the method of stepwise regression analysis is applied to the pooled samples utilization of services remains the most important predictor of treatment/need ratio. Others in order of importance are whether dental personnel decide on frequency of visits, whether the last visit was made for symptomatic reasons alone and whether lack of severity of symptoms had been a reason for avoiding oral health care. In relation to periodontal conditions no clear picture has emerged and this may demonstrate how systems of all types have failed to deal with this problem. Although much remains to be elaborated three main findings have already emerged from this study: (i) The need for reinforcement of preventive behaviour and services. (ii) The effectiveness of regulated contact between consumer and provider in meeting treatment needs. (iii) The need to concentrate on quality as well as volume of care in providing adequately for the needs of child and adolescent populations.
PubMed ID
1067234 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Filling therapy over 3 years in a group of school pupils in Ringerike]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74583
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1976 Jul;86(7):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1976

Finnish dentists' perceptions of the longevity of direct dental restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154016
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(1):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ulla Palotie
Miira M Vehkalahti
Author Affiliation
City of Helsinki Health Centre, Dental Care Department, Helsinki, Finland. ulla.palotie@helsinki.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(1):44-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Composite Resins - therapeutic use
Dental Amalgam - therapeutic use
Dental Bonding
Dental Caries - therapy
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate Finnish dentists' perceptions of the longevity of direct dental restorations; to assess the possible impacts of dentists' characteristics on these perceptions; and to compare the present longevity estimates with those of recent European reports.
A questionnaire to 592 general practitioners, systematically sampled from the Finnish Dental Association's membership list, was posted in April 2004 and data collection was finished by the end of June. The question "In general, what is your estimate for the mean age of restoration in permanent teeth?" pointed restorations: Class II and MOD composites and amalgam in a posterior tooth and Class III composites in an incisor. Dentists' gender, main work, and year of graduation served as background information. Of the 339 (57%) respondents, only public and private dentists were included; 11 were excluded. Three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for recent reports on restoration longevity. Statistical evaluation was by one-way ANOVA, with p=0.05 as the level of significance.
The mean of the estimates for all types of composite was 9.0 years (SD 3.6; 95% CI 8.6-9.3) and 18.7 years for amalgam (SD 7.3; 95% CI 18.0-19.5). Male dentists gave longer estimates than female dentists for posterior composites, but shorter estimates for amalgam. Compared to public dentists, private dentists gave longer estimates for posterior composites. All estimates were longer than those reported in the recent literature.
Dentists' perceptions of posterior composite longevity are significantly longer among males than among females and among private than public sector dentists, and exceed the median longevity reported in recent studies.
PubMed ID
19039686 View in PubMed
Less detail

48 records – page 1 of 5.