Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Caries assessment and restorative treatment thresholds reported by Swedish dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75772
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
I. Mejàre
H. Sundberg
I. Espelid
B. Tveit
Author Affiliation
Eastman Dental Institute, Stockholm County Council, Sweden. ingegerd.mejare@ftv.sll.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):149-54
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Decision Making
Dental Caries - classification - diagnosis - radiography - therapy
Dental Enamel - pathology - radiography
Dental Fissures - classification - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentin - pathology - radiography
Dentists
Disease Progression
Humans
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Private Practice
Public Health Dentistry
Questionnaires
Sweden
Tooth Discoloration - classification
Urban health
Abstract
The aim was to study any variability in approximal and occlusal caries diagnoses and restorative treatment decisions among Swedish dentists. The material consisted of a pre-coded questionnaire sent to a random sample of 923 dentists with 4 items concerning approximal and occlusal caries diagnosis and restorative treatment decisions. Responses were received from 651 (70.5%) dentists. In an adolescent with low caries activity and good oral hygiene, more than 90% of the dentists stated that they would not automatically restore a primary approximal caries lesion if its radiographic appearance did not show obvious progression in the outer 1/3 to 1/2 of the dentin. Moreover, 67% of the dentists would only consider immediate restorative treatment of an occlusal surface if obvious cavitation and/or radiographic signs of dentin caries could be observed. When diagnosing questionable occlusal caries, the dentists largely relied on the radiographic appearance. Concerning both approximal and occlusal caries, the threshold for restorative treatment differed between the metropolitan regions in Sweden, and younger more often than older dentists would postpone restorative treatment of approximal caries until the lesion had reached a relatively advanced stage of progression. The responses also showed that dentists in private practice would restore approximal caries at an earlier stage of progression than the dentists in the Public Dental Health Service.
PubMed ID
10480281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of simple screening criteria with the International Caries Detection and Assessment System classification in determining restorative treatment need.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275788
Source
Int Dent J. 2016 Apr;66(2):63-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Antti Kämppi
Tarja Tanner
Jari Päkkilä
Pertti Patinen
Leo Tjäderhane
Vuokko Anttonen
Source
Int Dent J. 2016 Apr;66(2):63-70
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
DMF Index
Dental Caries - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Military Personnel
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish Defence Forces' unique oral health-screening protocol (FDFsp) has been in use for decades. In FDFsp, restorative treatment need is determined based on the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of screening restorative treatment need with the outcome of using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) classification at both individual and tooth levels. Our hypothesis was that the outcome of screening with FDFsp agrees with the outcome of using the ICDAS classification.
In this study, a trained, calibrated examiner estimated, in a visual-tactile manner the restorative treatment need of 337 young healthy adults using the FDFsp. During the screening, 74 conscripts were selected for a thorough inspection. The inclusion criteria for those selected were: having no, having one to five, or having six or more caries lesions needing restorative treatment. In the thorough inspection, the participants were inspected in a visual-tactile manner using the ICDAS classification. The association of the outcomes achieved using the two different methods was analysed at individual and tooth levels. Sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values were calculated. Wisdom teeth were excluded.
At the individual level, the agreement between the outcomes of using FDFsp and ICDAS =4 was excellent: sensitivity, 94.1%; specificity, 97.5%; and kappa = 0.92. When ICDAS =3 was used, the values were 72.7%, 96.7%, and 0.66%, respectively.
Screening performed by a trained examiner using specific criteria is a reliable method for detecting individuals with restorative treatment need. The outcome of screening agrees strongly with results using the ICDAS classification.
PubMed ID
26503398 View in PubMed
Less detail

Visual and visuo-tactile detection of dental caries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50618
Source
J Dent Res. 2004;83 Spec No C:C56-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
A I Ismail
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1078, USA. ismailai@umich.edu
Source
J Dent Res. 2004;83 Spec No C:C56-66
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials
Dental Caries - classification - diagnosis
Humans
Physical Examination
Randomized Controlled Trials
Reproducibility of Results
Tooth Demineralization - diagnosis
Touch
Vision
Abstract
The objective of this review is to describe and discuss the content validity of a sample of caries detection criteria reported in the literature between January 1, 1966, and May 1, 2000. Using filters to locate randomized or controlled clinical trials on dental caries, fluorides, sealants, and "restorative" care, I identified a total of 171 documents from MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration's Oral Health Group (CC-OHG) special register. These articles met the following inclusion criteria: (1) Data had been collected from samples of patients or populations; and (2) dental caries was assessed clinically, and criteria were either published or described in the paper. From the selected articles, evidence tables were prepared describing each caries detection criterion. Analysis of the content validity of the criteria systems was based on evaluation of the disease process, exclusion of non-caries lesions, subjectivity, use of explorers, and drying of teeth prior to examination. This review included 29 unique criteria systems. Of those, 13 originated from the UK, 3 from the USA, 4 from Denmark, and others from the World Health Organization (WHO), Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Netherlands, and Canada. Thirteen of the criteria systems either measured active and inactive early and cavitated lesions or defined separate criteria for smooth and occlusal tooth surfaces. Nine systems measured early as well as cavitated stages of the caries process, and 7 measured cavitation only. Eleven of the criteria systems provided explicit descriptions of the disease process measured or information on how to exclude non-caries from caries lesions. The use of explorers and drying and cleaning of teeth varied widely among the criteria. The majority of the newly developed criteria systems originated from Europe. In conclusion, this review of the content validity of the 29 criteria systems found substantial variability in disease processes measured, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and examination conditions.
PubMed ID
15286124 View in PubMed
Less detail