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A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the effect of subvention on dental status and dental health services use].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243843
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1982;Suppl:1-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Age-specific associations between dental fear and dental condition among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92390
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Pohjola Vesa
Lahti Satu
Vehkalahti Miira M
Tolvanen Mimmi
Hausen Hannu
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. vesa.pohjola@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Caries - complications - psychology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Loss - complications - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study whether dental condition, measured by numbers of sound, decayed, missing, and restored teeth, was associated with dental fear, and whether age, dental attendance, and/or gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample (n=8,028) comprised Finnish adults aged 30 years and older and the study included people (n=6,335) who participated in a home interview and a clinical dental examination. Dental fear was measured by the question: "How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?" Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between dental fear and dental condition variables, i.e. numbers of decayed, missing, sound, and restored teeth considering the effects of age, attendance, and gender. RESULTS: With the exception of number of restored teeth, all dental condition variables were associated with dental fear. The association between dental fear and number of decayed teeth was positive and was independent of age, gender, and attendance. Age modified the association between dental fear and number of missing and sound teeth. Among the oldest age group, the numbers of missing and sound teeth were positively associated with dental fear while being negatively associated among the youngest age group. CONCLUSIONS: People with high dental fear have poorer dental condition than those with lower fear. Neither gender nor dental attendance affects the association between dental fear and dental condition. The associations between dental fear and numbers of missing and sound teeth vary according to year of birth.
PubMed ID
18720054 View in PubMed
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Analysis of patients utilizing emergency dental care in two Finnish cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233270
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Apr;46(2):105-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
E. Widström
I. Pietilä
P. Piironen
B. Nilsson
I. Savola
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Apr;46(2):105-12
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Care - utilization
Emergencies
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Toothache
Abstract
The use of emergency dental services was surveyed by interviewing patients seeking treatment during hours of organized emergency service in two large cities in Finland. It was spread rather evenly over all the days of the week. Marked differences were found between the volume of dental emergencies in the two cities. More than 60% of the patients had been in pain for 1 to 3 days and needed immediate help. One-third of the emergency visits were made by 20- to 29-year-olds. No significant differences in use of the services were found between men and women, although a larger proportion of women than men claimed to visit a dentist regularly and to have a dentist of their own. Fourteen per cent had failed to get an appointment with their regular dentist. More than 40% of the patients had used the emergency services previously. These patients, more often than first-time users, visited a dentist irregularly, did not have their own dentist, and were content with the rapid service at the emergency clinic.
PubMed ID
3164563 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the perceived oral treatment need using Andersen's behavioural model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108427
Source
Community Dent Health. 2013 Jun;30(2):102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
N. Lundegren
B. Axtelius
P-E Isberg
S. Akerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmd University, Sweden. nina.lundegren@mah.se
Source
Community Dent Health. 2013 Jun;30(2):102-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Educational Status
Female
Financing, Personal
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Pain - psychology
Self Report
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of specific components of Andersen's behavioural model on adult individuals' perceived oral treatment need.
A questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of 9,690 individuals, 20 to 89 years old, living in Skåne, Sweden. The 58 questions, some with follow-up questions, were answered by 6,123 individuals; a 63% response rate. Selected for inclusion in the multivariate logistic regression analysis were those questions relating to Andersen's behavioural model, phase five. Responses to "How do you rate your oral treatment need today?" were used as a dependent variable. The 62 questions chosen as independent variables represented the components: individual characteristics, health behaviour and outcomes in the model.
Of the independent variables, 24 were significant at the p
PubMed ID
23888540 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depressive disorders and dental fear among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137814
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2011 Feb;119(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Vesa Pohjola
Aino K Mattila
Matti Joukamaa
Satu Lahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. vesa.pohjola@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2011 Feb;119(1):55-60
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Care - utilization
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We studied the association between dental fear and anxiety or depressive disorders, as well as the comorbidity of dental fear with anxiety and depressive disorders, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, dental attendance, and dental health. Nationally representative data on Finnish adults, = 30 yr of age (n = 5,953), were gathered through interviews and clinical examination. Dental fear was measured using the question: 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' Anxiety and/or depressive disorders were assessed using a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to criteria presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) (DSM-IV).Those with depressive disorders, generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia more commonly reported high dental fear than did those without these disorders. When age, gender, education, dental attendance, and the number of decayed, missing, and restored teeth were considered, those with generalized anxiety disorder were more likely to have high dental fear than were participants with neither anxiety nor depressive disorders. The comorbidity of depressive and anxiety disorders also remained statistically significantly associated with dental fear; those with both depressive and anxiety disorders were more likely to have high dental fear than were those without these disorders. Our findings support the suggestion that some individuals may have a personality that is vulnerable to dental fear.
PubMed ID
21244512 View in PubMed
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Are there differences in oral health and oral health behavior between individuals with high and low dental fear?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62795
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;31(2):116-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Annemarie A Schuller
Tiril Willumsen
Dorthe Holst
Author Affiliation
TNO, Prevention and Health, Division of Child Health, Leiden, The Netherlands. AA.Schuller@pg.tno.nl
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;31(2):116-21
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - classification - psychology
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Tooth Loss - classification
Abstract
Epidemiological studies of the relationship between dental fear, use of dental services, and oral health in different age groups in a common population are scarce. Dental fear and its relationships are usually described in individuals with high dental fear only. The purposes of this study were to describe the prevalence of dental fear in the Norwegian adult population according to age, and to explore differences in oral health, oral hygiene, and visiting habits between individuals with high and low dental fear. For the present study, data from the Trøndelag-94 study were used. The prevalence of dental fear in our study population of adults in Trøndelag, Norway was 6.6%. There was a tendency for individuals with high dental fear to engage in avoidance behavior more frequently than the low dental fear group. Individuals with high dental fear had a statistically significantly higher number of decayed surfaces (DS), decayed teeth, (DT) and missing teeth (MT) but a statistically significantly lower number of filled surfaces (FS), filled teeth (FT), functional surfaces (FSS), and functional teeth (FST). There were no differences in DMFS and DMFT between the groups of high and low dental fear. Since one of the superior aims of the dental profession is to help a patient to achieve a high number of functional teeth throughout life, consequently detecting and treating dental fear should therefore be an important aspect of dental processionals' work.
PubMed ID
12641592 View in PubMed
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Association of lifestyle with periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11391
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
T K Sakki
M L Knuuttila
S S Vimpari
M S Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dental Care - utilization
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
All the 1012, 55-yr-old citizens of Oulu (a medium-sized Finnish town) were invited to a clinical examination, and 780 of them participated. The associations of lifestyle with periodontal health were analyzed in the 527 dentate subjects. Periodontal pockets deeper than 3 mm were recorded as a percentage of the surfaces at risk. Lifestyle was measured by questions about dietary habits, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and physical activity. Lifestyle had an independent association with periodontal health. Periodontal pocketing increased with an unhealthier lifestyle. Lifestyle could explain some of the social and sex differences in periodontal health.
PubMed ID
7634770 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to dental care, Sweden 2003-2013, and clinical correlates of oral health-related quality of life in 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296029
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2018 May; 16(2):257-266
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
K Edman
A Holmlund
B Nordström
K Öhrn
Author Affiliation
Center for Oral Rehabilitation, Public Dental Services, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2018 May; 16(2):257-266
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Quality of Life
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate attitudes to dental care, and to assess possible associations with socio-economic and clinical variables over a period of ten years, and to investigate the association between OHRQoL assessed by oral impact on daily performance (OIDP), and socio-economic, dental care habits, smoking and oral status.
Cross-sectional studies performed in the county of Dalarna, Sweden, in 2003, 2008 and 2013. Random samples of 1,107-1,115 dentate individuals, aged 30-85 years, who answered a questionnaire and who were radiographically and clinically examined were included.
The importance of preventive treatment, regular recalls and meeting the same caregiver as on previous visits became less important. In individuals with alveolar bone loss, meeting the same caregiver as on previous visits was important (P
PubMed ID
28133937 View in PubMed
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Canadians are getting the message--and acting on it.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231037
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1989 Apr;55(4):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989

104 records – page 1 of 11.