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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131297
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e656-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Debora C Matthews
Martha G S Brillant
Joanne B Clovis
Mary E McNally
Mark J Filiaggi
Robert D Kotzer
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. dmatthew@dal.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e656-66
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Health Surveys - methods
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forecasting
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Nova Scotia
Oral Health
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Quality of Life
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey.
An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45-64 and =65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted.
The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45-64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits.
Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies.
Notes
Cites: J Periodontol. 1999 Jan;70(1):13-2910052767
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;26(1):52-619511843
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;25(4):284-909332805
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1997 Winter;57(1):48-589150063
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2000 Spring;60(2):72-8110929564
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Apr;21(2):108-138485969
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010;10:2620356408
Cites: J Dent Res. 2007 Oct;86(10):992-617890677
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:20816911771
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;34(4):310-916856951
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2002 Aug;57(2):119-2912062857
PubMed ID
21916953 View in PubMed
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[Commercial outpatient-polyclinic dental care for the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202956
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1998;77(6):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
A V Shipskii
I R Akaev
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1998;77(6):52-5
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Clinics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dentistry, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Health Priorities
Humans
Moscow
Orthodontics - statistics & numerical data
Periodontics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
The authors have analysed annual activity of the dental clinic. On the grounds of the analysis they have formulated principles that can help commercial dental services to become a highly effective part of general medical aid to population. The principles are: highly skilled surgical (periodontological), therapeutic, orthopaedic aid in cooperation and specialisation in accordance with generally adopted staff standards; complex of periodontological aid; modern medicines and filling materials. Statistical data on each dental manipulation requirement in the conditions of commercial dental clinic are provided.
PubMed ID
10067419 View in PubMed
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Demand for and utilization of dental services according to household income in the adult population in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128059
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;40(4):297-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Jostein Grytten
Dorthe Holst
Irene Skau
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. josteing@odont.uio.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;40(4):297-305
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the effect of income on demand and utilization of dental services according to household income in the adult population.
The data were collected using a questionnaire, which was sent to a random sample of Norwegians aged 20 years or older living at home, 1861 persons in total. Demand was measured according to whether the person had been to the dentist during the last year. Utilization was measured as expenditure for dental treatment for those who had been to the dentist during the last year. The independent variables were the respondents' household income, age, gender, education, dental status and the mean fee for a dental consultation in the municipality. In the first stage, we carried out a logistic regression analysis of the log odds of having demanded dental services during the last year. In the second stage, we carried out a multiple regression analysis of expenditure for dental treatment for those who had been to the dentist during the last year.
Altogether, 80% of the respondents had been to the dentist during the last year. Demand during the last year varied most according to dental status. There was little difference between men and women. The results of the logistic regression showed that the probability of having been to the dentist was 0.82 for those with a household income of €25 000 and 0.85 for those with a household income of €100 000. Mean expenditure for dental treatment was €355. There was no statistically significant relationship between household income and expenditure for dental treatment.
Differences in demand for dental services according to household income are small, and there are no differences in utilization according to income. The findings are interesting, because in a population in which people have to pay almost all the costs for dental treatment themselves, one would expect the income differences in demand and utilization to be greater.
PubMed ID
22239170 View in PubMed
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Dental caries prevalence among adults in Denmark--the impact of socio-demographic factors and use of oral health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93685
Source
Community Dent Health. 2007 Dec;24(4):225-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Krustrup U.
Petersen P E
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Dentistry, Department for Community Dentistry and Graduate Studies, Copenhagen, Denmark. uk@odont.ku.dk
Source
Community Dent Health. 2007 Dec;24(4):225-32
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To measure the prevalence of dental caries in the Danish adult population and to analyse how the risk of dental caries is affected by age, gender, region, area, and socio-economic factors. Furthermore to assess the impact on dental caries experience of use of oral health services during childhood and adult life. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN ANDPARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1,115 Danish adults in ages 35-44 years and 65-74 years. Data were collected by means of personal interviews and by clinical examinations according to criteria of the World Health Organization. Dental caries was recorded at tooth and tooth surface levels. RESULTS: At age 35-44 years the mean caries experience was 46.6 DMF-S against a mean of 104.1 DMF-S in the total sample of 65-74-year-olds. The D-component was low (35-44 years D-S = 0.9; 65-74 years D-S = 1.5). The M-component was three times higher in the elderly than in the younger age group. The multivariate analysis showed that significantly more untreated decay was found among men, in rural areas and in low income groups. A significantly higher score of filled surfaces were found among older adults and in the group with more education (12-13 years) whereas the F-component was low in the low income group. The total DMF-S was significantly higher among the elderly, persons living in Jutland and in groups with less education, while men had low DMF-S compared to women. CONCLUSION: Reducing social inequality in dental caries experience remains a challenge to oral health services in Denmark; strengthening community-oriented oral disease prevention and health promotion is needed to improve the oral health in the Danish adult population.
PubMed ID
18246840 View in PubMed
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The effect of non-insured health benefits on dental treatment provided in four coastal Labrador communities by salaried dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227721
Source
Pages 662-663 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991, Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
Messer, James G.
Author Affiliation
Grenfell Regional Health Services, St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Pages 662-663 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991, Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador
PubMed ID
1365258 View in PubMed
Documents
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Evaluation of three years of dental care of adolescents in the Public Dental Service in west Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72267
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(4):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. Jälevik
O. Sjöström
J G Norén
Author Affiliation
Specialist Clinic for Pedodontics, Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(4):141-8
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Comparative Study
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology - radiography
Dental Records - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Public Health Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Radiography, Bitewing
Random Allocation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
107 individuals, randomly selected from the County of Göteborg and Bohuslän, all born in 1970 were followed regarding the dental care received 1987-1989. The records of each individual from the actual time were collected and information on diagnosis and treatment measures was gathered. Radiographs from the actual time were studied by one of the authors. Sixty-two per cent of the adolescents had been examined and treated all 3 years. Six percent had not been seen at all. The sample was divided into three groups depending on the patient's DFSa value at the examination the first year. This classification appeared to correlate well with caries development in the following years. One-fourth of the sample was responsible for the major part of the non-attendance and late cancellations. The dental health of these subjects was below average, and non-attendance seemed to be a further risk factor. The preventive measures undertaken during the study appeared to correlate poorly with the actual situation of the patient and the presence or absence of potential risk factors.
PubMed ID
10591457 View in PubMed
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Explanatory models for clinically determined and symptom-reported caries indicators in an adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52555
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
L. Unell
B. Söderfeldt
A. Halling
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Unit, Orebro County Council, Sweden. lennart.unell@orebroll.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):132-8
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin Sensitivity - epidemiology
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Health
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Oral Health
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Toothache - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to analyze possible indicators of: (i) relative number of decayed and filled teeth, (ii) relative number of decayed teeth, (iii) subjectively reported toothache, and (iv) sensitive teeth, and to find explanatory models for these phenomena. Independent variables from three domains were used: (i) socio-economic factors, (ii) general health and health-related lifestyle, and (iii) dental attitudes and behaviors. The study basis was validated questionnaires from all 50-year-olds in 2 Swedish counties (n = 8888), response rate 71% (n = 6343). For a 20% subsample (58% participation) the DFT and DT were determined by calibrated dentists. Analyses were done with logistic and multiple regression. The variables born outside Sweden, gender, education, shift work, satisfaction with dental care, fear and care utilization were associated with DFT/number of teeth. For DT/number of teeth, the direction of association was reversed for the variables born outside Sweden and gender. Social class, education, general health, and use of tobacco were further covariates. Good oral hygiene gave a lower ratio of DT. For the logistic regression model of toothache, residence in cities and satisfaction with dental care had lower probability for toothache reports, while born outside Sweden, mouth dryness, use of pharmaceuticals, tobacco, fear, and high utilization increased this probability. In general, the association pattern was as could be expected: immigrants, working class, low education, smoking, dissatisfaction with dental treatment and low utilization all appeared as risk factors for both the clinically determined caries indicators, but not necessarily for subjective symptom reports. Only fear of dental treatment showed a consistent positive association with all the indicators.
PubMed ID
10480278 View in PubMed
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Gender-based differences in factors related to non-utilization of dental care in young Norwegians. A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52105
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Oct;111(5):377-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Erik Skaret
Magne Raadal
Gerd Kvale
Einar Berg
Author Affiliation
Center for Odontophobia, Faculty of Odontology, University of Bergen, Norway. erik.skaret@odont.uib.no
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Oct;111(5):377-82
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Dental Anxiety - psychology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Odds Ratio
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study had the following aims: (i): to evaluate the utilization of dental care among young adults during the age period from 18 to 23 yr; and (ii) to explore possible characteristics at the age of 18 yr that may predict non-utilization of dental care at the age of 23 yr. Respondents from a random sample of adolescents that had been surveyed at the age of 18 yr (n = 968) were surveyed again at the age of 23 yr. The data were based on (1) baseline data collected at the age 18 yr, and (2) a questionnaire mailed to the same subjects at the age of 23 yr. The response rate was 69%. The time since the last dental appointment at the age of 23 yr was longer for men than for women. Of the 2% that had not been to the dentist for the last 5 yr or more, the majority were men (69%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the following characteristics at the age of 18 yr were predictive of being included in a non-utilization group (n = 45) at the age of 23 yr: multiple fears (odds ratio (OR) = 3.0), treatment at the age of 18 yr not completed (OR = 2.5), and high dental anxiety (OR = 2.0 for women and OR = 1.2 for men). These gender differences may influence future strategies for prevention of dropout from care and possible interventions aimed at bringing adolescents back to regular dental care.
PubMed ID
12974679 View in PubMed
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Income, dental insurance coverage, and financial barriers to dental care among Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127154
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):327-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
David Locker
John Maggirias
Carlos Quiñonez
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Serv Res Unit, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):327-34
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Sex Factors
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the issue of affordability in dental care by assessing associations between income, dental insurance, and financial barriers to dental care in Canadian adults.
Data were collection from a national sample of adults 18 years and over using a telephone interview survey based on random digit dialing. Questions were asked about household income and dental insurance coverage along with three questions concerning cost barriers to accessing dental care. These were: "In the past three years...has the cost of dental care been a financial burden to you?...have you delayed or avoided going to a dentist because of the cost?...have you been unable to have all of the treatment recommended by your dentist because of the cost?"
The survey was completed by 2,027 people, over half of which (56.0%) were covered by private dental insurance and 4.9 percent by public dental programs. The remainder, 39.1 percent, paid for dental care out-of-pocket. Only 19.3 percent of the lowest income group had private coverage compared with 80.5 percent of the highest income group (P
PubMed ID
22320291 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.