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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275277
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Nora Hiivala
Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa
Hanna-Leena Tefke
Heikki Murtomaa
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dissent and Disputes
Expert Testimony
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Harm - classification - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Risk Management
Sex Factors
Abstract
Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland.
The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases.
Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications.
Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.
PubMed ID
25967591 View in PubMed
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Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131297
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e656-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Debora C Matthews
Martha G S Brillant
Joanne B Clovis
Mary E McNally
Mark J Filiaggi
Robert D Kotzer
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. dmatthew@dal.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e656-66
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Health Surveys - methods
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forecasting
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Nova Scotia
Oral Health
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Quality of Life
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey.
An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45-64 and =65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted.
The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45-64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits.
Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies.
Notes
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Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1997 Winter;57(1):48-589150063
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PubMed ID
21916953 View in PubMed
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Association between moderate to severe psoriasis and periodontitis in a Scandinavian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266915
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Ellen Margrethe Slevolden
Bjørn Frode Hansen
Leiv Sandvik
Hans Ragnar Preus
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Psoriasis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of periodontitis and alveolar bone loss among individuals with psoriasis and a group of randomly selected controls.
Fifty individuals with psoriasis and 121 controls completed a structured questionnaire, and were examined clinically and radiographically. Oral examination included numbers of missing teeth, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), presence of dental plaque and bleeding on probing, as well as alveolar bone loss from radiographs. Questionnaires requested information on age, gender, education, dental care, smoking habits, general diseases and medicament use. For adjustment for baseline differences between psoriasis individuals and controls the propensity score based on gender, age and education was computed using multivariate logistic regression. A subsample analysis for propensity score matched psoriasis individuals (n?=?50) and controls (n?=?50) was performed.
When compared with controls, psoriasis individuals had significantly more missing teeth and more sites with plaque and bleeding on probing. The prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis was significantly higher among psoriasis individuals (24%) compared to healthy controls (10%). Similarly, 36% of psoriasis cases had one or more sites with radiographic bone loss =3 mm, compared to 13% of controls. Logistic regression analysis showed that the association between moderate/severe periodontitis and psoriasis remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score, but was attenuated when smoking was entered into the model. The association between psoriasis and one or more sites with bone loss =3 mm remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score and smoking and regularity of dental visits. In the propensity score (age, gender and education) matched sample (n?=?100) psoriasis remained significantly associated with moderate/severe periodontitis and radiographic bone loss.
Within the limits of the present study, periodontitis and radiographic bone loss is more common among patients with moderate/severe psoriasis compared with the general population. This association remained significant after controlling for confounders.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25427764 View in PubMed
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Association between periodontal condition and hypertension in a non-smoking population aged 30-49 years: results of the Health 2000 Survey in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268493
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Emilia Ollikainen
Tuomas Saxlin
Tellervo Tervonen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Antti Jula
Pekka Ylöstalo
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diabetes mellitus
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Smoking
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether periodontal condition is associated with hypertension and systolic blood pressure.
The study population consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years (n = 1296) in the national Health 2000 Survey in Finland. The number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) and deep (=6 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of sextants with gingival bleeding were used as explanatory variables. Hypertension and systolic blood pressure were used as outcome variables.
There was no consistent association between the number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.01) or deep (=6 mm) (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.12) periodontal pockets and hypertension after adjusting for confounding factors. Nor was there any essential association between the number of bleeding sextants and hypertension.
Periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding did not appear to be related to hypertension in non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years. Further studies using experimental study designs would be required to determine the role of infectious periodontal diseases in the development or progression of hypertension.
PubMed ID
25256004 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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The burden of oral disorders in a population of older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223718
Source
Community Dent Health. 1992 Jun;9(2):109-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1992 Jun;9(2):109-24
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Communication
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Eating
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Marriage
Mastication
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mouth Diseases - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Abstract
This paper describes the burden of oral disorders in a population of adults aged 50 years and over living independently in the community. In so doing it uses clinical, functional, experiential and psychosocial impact measures to document the oral health status of this section of the population. The data reveal that substantial proportions of subjects report that their quality of life was compromised in some way by oral problems. Although only 24.1 per cent were edentulous, 30.5 per cent were unable to chew one or more foods; 37.2 per cent reported oral or facial pain in the previous four weeks and 67.5 per cent experienced one or more other oral symptoms. One third reported problems with eating and communication--social interaction, 18.7 per cent worried a great deal about their oral health and 30.8 per cent were dissatisfied with some aspect of their oral health status. Income was consistently associated with all health status measures examined, demonstrating the scope of inequalities in oral health. In addition, regression analysis showed that low income groups had higher scores on a psychosocial impact scale after controlling for clinical, functional and experiential oral health indicators. The paper illustrates the utility of a model of disease and its consequences derived from the international classification of impairments, disabilities and handicaps in exploring oral health.
PubMed ID
1504877 View in PubMed
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Cancer-related oral health care services and resources: a survey of oral and dental care in Canadian cancer centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180201
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2004 May;70(5):302-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Joel B Epstein
Ira R Parker
Matthew S Epstein
Peter Stevenson-Moore
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA. jepstein@uic.edu
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2004 May;70(5):302-4
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Canada
Cancer Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - etiology - therapy
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mouth Diseases - etiology - therapy
Mouth Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Questionnaires
Abstract
Prevention and management of oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy will improve oral function and quality of life, and reduce morbidity and the cost of care. Oral assessment, and oral and dental care have been strongly recommended before cancer therapy and should be continued during and after cancer therapy. The purpose of this survey was to assess the resources available for oral care in Canadian cancer centres.
Provincial cancer centres were assessed by questionnaire to determine the resources available for oral care in these facilities.
Wide variability in oral and dental care of patients with cancer across Canada and a lack of documented standards of care were reported. Very few cancer centres had institutionally supported dental staff to support the oral care of patients with cancer, and few had dental treatment capability on site. The majority of centres managed oral care needs in the community with the patient's prior dentist.
We recommend that national guidelines be developed for medically necessary oral and dental care for patients with cancer.
PubMed ID
15132812 View in PubMed
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Caries and background factors in Norwegian and immigrant 5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98819
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tove I Wigen
Nina J Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Behavioural Science, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. wigen@odont.uio.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - classification
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Parents - education - psychology
Prevalence
Self Concept
Social Class
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the caries status of 5-year-olds in a low caries area, and study associations between dental caries and parent-related factors: parents' education, national origin, oral health behaviours and attitudes. METHODS: The material consisted of 523 children and was a stratified random sample. Clinical and radiographic examination was performed in 2007. Enamel and dentine caries were recorded at surface level. Parents filled in questionnaires regarding socioeconomic status, their own oral health behaviours and attitudes. RESULTS: Most participants (66%) had no caries experience and 16% had enamel caries only. Dentine caries experience was present in 18% of the children, and 5% had dentine caries experience in five or more teeth. Surfaces with enamel caries constituted half of all surfaces with caries experience. In multiple logistic regression, statistically significant risk indicators for the child having dentine caries experience at the age of five were: having one or both parents of non-western origin (OR = 4.8), both parents (OR = 3.0) or one parent (OR = 2.1) with low education, parental laxness about the child's tooth brushing (OR = 2.8), parents' brushing their own teeth less than twice a day (OR = 2.2) and having parents with frequent sugar intakes (OR = 1.8). CONCLUSION: Caries prevalence in 5-year-olds was strongly associated with parent-related factors signifying that information on parents' socioeconomic status, dental behaviours and attitudes should be considered when planning dental services for young children. Our results suggest that the real high risk group is non-western children whose parents have low education.
PubMed ID
19845710 View in PubMed
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113 records – page 1 of 12.