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Crossover of exhaustion between dentists and dental nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259215
Source
Stress Health. 2014 Apr;30(2):110-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jari J Hakanen
Riku Perhoniemi
Arnold B Bakker
Source
Stress Health. 2014 Apr;30(2):110-21
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Empathy
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Hierarchy, Social
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Power (Psychology)
Psychological Theory
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the conditions under which job-related exhaustion may transmit (cross over) from dentists to dental nurses and vice versa. We conducted a cross-sectional survey study among 470 Finnish dentist-dental nurse dyads and used moderated structural equation modelling analyses. We found no support for the direct crossover of exhaustion from one work partner to the other. Instead, we found that exhaustion transferred from dentists to dental nurses only when collaboration was frequent and dental nurses perceived the collaboration as friendly or consisting of mutual feedback. In contrast, dentists were not affected by dental nurses' exhaustion. These results indicate that exhaustion can be contagious in work dyads and may be fuelled by positive and frequent interpersonal relationships when the partner who is higher in the hierarchy has high (versus low) levels of exhaustion. Thus, interpersonal and hierarchical relationships among work partners may play an important role in the crossover process. Limitations and implications are mentioned.
PubMed ID
23723149 View in PubMed
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Cultural and communicational traits of oral health care: results of a Finnish case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166079
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2006;20(6):537-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kirsti Kasila
Marita Poskiparta
Jari Villberg
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. kirsti.kasila@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2006;20(6):537-50
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benchmarking
Communication
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dental Clinics - organization & administration - standards
Dental Staff - psychology
Finland
Hierarchy, Social
Humans
Institutional Practice
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Middle Aged
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Professional Role
State Dentistry - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
This paper aims to describe the cultural and communicational traits of Finnish oral health care. First, employees' views and experiences regarding their organization and their position within it are investigated and, second, relations between different individual and organizational factors are analyzed. Finally, a conceptual framework of organizational coherence is constructed.
The paper shows that data collection (n = 58, 84 percent response rate) was carried out in 2002 at a Finnish dental clinic by using a semi-structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed statistically by using, among other things, non-parametric tests and a structural equation model (LISREL) and qualitatively by using content analysis.
The paper finds that the organization was described as role-dependent and task-centered. Unidirectional chain of communication and responsibility for interaction were observed as the descriptive traits of communication, regardless of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the communication. Developmental challenges involved opportunities to exert influence in the organization as well as giving and receiving feedback in leadership relations. It was found that a good sense of one's position in the organization was positively associated with several essential experiences (e.g. confidence, openness and equality), regarding organizational factors.
It appears in this paper likely that, by adopting the perspective of organizational coherence, it will be possible to approach the reality of an oral health care organization. As such a new and informative perspective is added.
PubMed ID
17168105 View in PubMed
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Evaluating different measures of sickness absence with respect to work characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168988
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(3):247-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ulrica von Thiele
Petra Lindfors
Ulf Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, and Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University. uvt@psychology.su.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(3):247-53
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dental Clinics - manpower
Dental Hygienists - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Questionnaires
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Time Factors
Workload - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Four different measures of sickness absence were related to psychosocial and physical work characteristics in workplaces with high, intermediate, and low sickness absence. The relationships between work characteristics and sickness absence were hypothesized to differ depending the sickness absence measure used.
Questionnaire data on physical work environment, physical load, support, influence at work, and worry were collected from 1,726 employees at 48 dental clinics in Stockholm, Sweden and were related to registry-based sickness absence obtained at the workplace level. The sickness absence measures included: (1) frequency, (2) one-day absence, (3) overall duration, and (4) duration between 2 and 21 days.
For frequency, significant differences were found for all work characteristics, with poor work characteristics being associated with a high frequency of sickness absence. Considering duration between 2 and 21 days, there were significant differences in support, influence at work and physical work environment; for one-day absence, support, influence at work and physical load differed significantly. Conversely, there were no significant differences for the overall duration measure.
The results show that frequency of sickness absence is most consistently related to work characteristics, that short-time sickness absences have more inconsistent relationships and that relationship with overall duration is lacking. This highlights the need for further differentiation between different sickness absence measures, the behavioral patterns associated with different types of absences and the implication of such processes for prevention and intervention.
PubMed ID
16754582 View in PubMed
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Exposure to mercury vapor and impact on health in the dental profession in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52690
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Jul;76(7):1397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
S. Langworth
G. Sällsten
L. Barregård
I. Cynkier
M L Lind
E. Söderman
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Jul;76(7):1397-404
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects - analysis
Dental Assistants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Psychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Volatilization
Abstract
Possible adverse effects of mercury exposure in dentistry have been discussed in several studies. The objective of the present study was to carry out detailed measurements of mercury exposure in the dental profession in Sweden, and to search for adverse health effects from such exposure. We examined 22 dentists and 22 dental nurses, working in teams, at six Swedish dental clinics. Measurements of air mercury, performed with personal, active air samplers, showed a median air Hg of 1.8 micrograms/m3 for the dentists, and 2.1 micrograms/m3 for the dental nurses. Spot measurements with a direct reading instrument displayed temporarily elevated air Hg, especially during the preparation and application of amalgam. The average concentration of mercury in whole blood (B-Hg) was 18 nmol/L, in plasma (P-Hg) 5.1 nmol/L, and in urine (U-Hg) 3.0 nmol/mmol creatinine. Possible effects on the central nervous system (CNS) were registered with three questionnaires: Q16, Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), and the Profile of Mood Scales (POMS). In the Q16, the number of symptoms was statistically significantly higher in the dentistry group compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 44). The urinary excretion of albumin and urinary activity of the tubular enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucose-aminidase (NAG) did not differ between the two groups. The results confirm that exposure to mercury in the dental profession in Sweden is low. The air Hg levels were mainly influenced by the method of amalgam preparation and inserting, and by the method of air evacuation during drilling and polishing.
PubMed ID
9207773 View in PubMed
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It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291195
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2017 08; 45(4):372-379
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Hanne Berthelsen
Hugo Westerlund
Jari J Hakanen
Tage S Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies & the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2017 08; 45(4):372-379
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Clinics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Practice, Dental - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress - epidemiology - etiology
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Dentistry is characterized by a meaningful but also stressful psychosocial working environment. Job satisfaction varies among staff working under different organizational forms. The aim of this study was to identify (i) to what extent crucial psychosocial work environment characteristics differ among occupations in general public dental clinics in Sweden, and (ii) how much of the variation within each occupation is attributable to the organizational level.
All staff (N=1782) employed in four public dental organizations received an email with personal log-in to an electronic questionnaire based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. After two reminders, a response rate of 75% was obtained. Responses from 880 nonmanagerial dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses working in general practices were included in our analyses.
First, we compared the three dental occupations. We found that job demands, task resources (eg influence, possibilities for development and role clarity), strain symptoms and attitudes to work differed among occupations, dentists having the least favourable situation. Next, we compared the four organizations for each occupational group, separately. For dentists, a significant and relevant amount of variance (P.05) was explained by the organizational level for 15 of 26 subscales, least pronounced for task resources. By contrast, for dental nurses and hygienists, the corresponding number was 2 subscales of 26. The psychosocial working environment of people working at the organization with the highest levels of strain indicators and the least positive work-related attitudes differed systematically from the organization with the most favourable profile, in particular regarding job demands and leadership aspects.
In conclusion, the psychosocial working environment depended to a large degree on occupation and, for dentists in particular, also on their organizational affiliation. The findings suggest a potential for designing interventions at organizational level for improvements of the psychosocial working environment for dentists.
PubMed ID
28421641 View in PubMed
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Ways of understanding the encounter with head and neck cancer patients in the hospital dental team--a phenomenographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82555
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):1046-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Röing Marta
Hirsch J-M
Holmström Inger
Author Affiliation
Hospital Dentistry, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala, Sweden. marta.roing@lul.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):1046-54
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dental Hygienists - psychology
Dental Staff, Hospital - psychology
Emotions
Empathy
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional Role
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Design
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Fifty percent of the patients can be cured by surgery, radiotherapy or a combination approach. Head and neck cancer is life-threatening, and treatment may leave the patient with visible facial disfigurements and impairment of functions such as speech and eating. This affects not only the patient, but may arouse difficult feelings in the treatment staff. Dental personnel are involved in all facets of treatment, yet they have no specific training in cancer care. BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the variation in ways dental personnel understand and experience the encounter with head and neck cancer patients, as the way of understanding a certain phenomenon is judged to be fundamental to the way we act and form our beliefs. METHODS: Twenty members of hospital dental teams were interviewed. The interviews focused on experiences of the encounter with head and neck cancer patients. A qualitative research approach, phenomenography, was used in analysing the interviews. The encounter was perceived in three qualitatively different ways: as an act of caring, as a serious and responsible task and as an overwhelming emotional situation. The results indicate that hospital dental personnel are not able to lean on education and professional training in finding ways of dealing with situations with strong emotional impact. This has implications for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer, as well as education of dental personnel.
PubMed ID
16572314 View in PubMed
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With a little help from my assistant: buffering the negative effects of emotional dissonance on dentist performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262900
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;41(5):415-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Alma M Rodríguez-Sánchez
Jari J Hakanen
Riku Perhoniemi
Marisa Salanova
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;41(5):415-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Cognitive Dissonance
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
In this study, we hypothesized that dentist' interpersonal resources (good cooperation with one's assistant) together with their personal resources (optimism) buffer the negative effects of emotional dissonance (a demand that occurs when there is a difference between felt and displayed emotions) on job performance (in-role and extra-role performance) over time.
We carried out Hierarchical Regression Modeling on a sample of 1954 Finnish dentists who participated in a two-wave 4-year longitudinal study.
Results showed that good cooperation with dental assistants buffered the negative effects of emotional dissonance on both in-role and extra-role performance among the dentists in the long term. However, unexpectedly, dentists' high optimism did not buffer their in-role nor extra-role performance over time under conditions of experiencing high emotional dissonance.
We conclude that interpersonal job resources such as good cooperation with one's colleagues may buffer the negative effect of emotional dissonance on dentists' job performance even in the long term, whereas the role of personal resources (e.g., optimism) may be less important for maintaining high job performance under conditions of emotional dissonance. The study novelties include the test of the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance in dentistry and the identification of the job rather than personal resources as the buffers against the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance.
PubMed ID
23330851 View in PubMed
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Work characteristics and upper extremity disorders in female dental health workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81776
Source
J Occup Health. 2006 May;48(3):192-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Lindfors Petra
von Thiele Ulrica
Lundberg Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden. pls@psychology.su.se
Source
J Occup Health. 2006 May;48(3):192-7
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dental Hygienists - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health status
Human Engineering
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden
Upper Extremity - pathology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Many dental health workers suffer from musculoskeletal disorders in the upper extremities. In addition to ergonomic factors, psychosocial work characteristics have been linked to musculoskeletal disorders. The present cross-sectional study aimed at investigating how musculoskeletal disorders in the upper extremities (UED) and occupational position are related to work characteristics and general health problems in female dental health workers. Questionnaire data from dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses (N=945) showed that 81% reported UED. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that dentists reported the highest levels of physical load and fatigue whereas dental nurses reported the lowest levels of influence at work. Irrespective of position, those with UED considered their physical and psychosocial work environment and their own health to be significantly poorer than did those without UED. A hierarchical multiple regression showed that the physical load of dentistry was most strongly related to UED. Despite improvements to the ergonomics and physical work environment of dentistry, it is concluded that female dental health workers are still at high risk of developing UED.
PubMed ID
16788280 View in PubMed
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Work environment factors affecting quality work in Swedish oral and maxillofacial surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91445
Source
Swed Dent J. 2008;32(3):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Pilgård Göran
Söderfeldt Björn
Hjalmers Karin
Rosenquist Jan
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. goran.pilgard@vgregion.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2008;32(3):149-55
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Dental Assistants - psychology
Dental Clinics - manpower - standards
Dental Hygienists - psychology
Dental Staff, Hospital - psychology - standards
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Occupational Health
Professional Competence
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - manpower - standards
Sweden
Workload - psychology
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how work environment influenced attitudes to and knowledge of quality among employees of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) clinics in Sweden. Data were collected with a questionnaire of 67 questions, related to quality management at the clinic, working situation, content of "good work", physical environment and health. 22 clinics with 297 employees responded, 65% of the clinics and 86% of the employees. A multiple regression analysis with the dependent variable "Attitude towards quality work" showed that only "work environment" (p = 0.010) revealed a significant association (p
PubMed ID
18973085 View in PubMed
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Work-related stress and its predictors among Canadian dental assistants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230058
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Oct;17(5):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
D. Locker
D. Burman
D. Otchere
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Oct;17(5):263-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Personnel Management
Personnel Turnover
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
This paper reports the results of a survey of 1000 certified dental assistants in Ontario, Canada. The aim was to obtain data on work-related stress, its sources and predictors. Of those responding to the survey, 38.8% said that their work was moderately stressful and 14.5% said it was very or extremely stressful. Approximately one-third had been bothered by stress at work on three or more days in the previous week. The main sources of stress were working under constant time pressures, running behind schedule and feeling undervalued by the dentist. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the main predictors of work stress were not having a clear job description, working long hours, life stress while not at work and age. However, these variables explained less than 10% of the variance in job stress scores. Overall, 22.8% said it was very likely that they would seek work in another practice or seek work outside dentistry in the coming year. There was a significant association between work stress and job intentions; 43.0% of those reporting high levels of stress intended to change jobs compared to 8.9% of those who said that their job was not at all stressful (P less than 0.0001). These findings have implications for the way in which dental practice is organised and managed.
PubMed ID
2791518 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.