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Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Predict Survival in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298110
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Satu Mäkelä
Markku Asola
Henrik Hadimeri
James Heaf
Maija Heiro
Leena Kauppila
Susanne Ljungman
Mai Ots-Rosenberg
Johan V Povlsen
Björn Rogland
Petra Roessel
Jana Uhlinova
Maarit Vainiotalo
Maria K Svensson
Heini Huhtala
Heikki Saha
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland satu.m.makela@pshp.fi.
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Ankle Brachial Index
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death - trends
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Calcification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice.
We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar X ray, and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device.
The median AACS was 11 (range 0 - 24). In 58% of the patients, all 4 segments of the abdominal aorta showed deposits, while 19% of patients had no visible deposits (AACS 0). Ankle-brachial index was normal in 49%, low ( 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS = 7 (p
PubMed ID
29386304 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and risk of myocardial infarction in middle-aged Danes: the diet, cancer and health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290731
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
V B Gunge
I Andersen
C Kyrø
C P Hansen
C C Dahm
J Christensen
A Tjønneland
A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Healthy Diet
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
For decades, the Mediterranean diet has been in focus regarding healthy eating as it has been associated with reduced risk of non-communicable diseases. Less interest has been given to health benefits of other regional diets. The aim of the present study was to assess whether adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was associated with lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI) among middle-aged Danes.
Data were obtained from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study of 57?053 men and women aged 50-64 years recruited between 1993 and 1997. The healthy Nordic food index comprised healthy Nordic food items selected a priori (fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apple and pears and root vegetables). Information on incident MI was ascertained through linkage with national registries. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models.
In total, 1669 men and 653 women developed MI during follow-up (13.6 median years). In adjusted models, those with an index score of 5-6 points (highest scores) had significantly lower MI risk (men: HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.62, 0.97; women: HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.37, 0.82) relative to those scoring 0 points in the index (lowest score). A significantly lower MI risk was found per 1-point increment in the index in both men (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.92, 0.99) and women (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.88, 0.98).
A healthy Nordic diet is associated with lower MI risk among middle-aged Danes, suggesting that Nordic diets should be considered in recommendations for dietary changes in the promotion of coronary health.
PubMed ID
28247857 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national food-based dietary guidelines and incidence of stroke: A cohort study of Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299135
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Sine Hammer Hansen
Kim Overvad
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
National dietary guidelines are intended to promote primary prevention of lifestyle-related diseases, but little is known about their effectiveness in prevention of stroke.
We used the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health (n = 57 053) to investigate whether adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines was associated with risk of stroke. Adherence was assessed by the Danish Dietary Guidelines Index, score 0 [no adherence] to 6 [complete adherence]. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for stroke and subtypes of stroke in men and women separately.
Incident stroke was determined in 1357 men and 900 women during follow-up (median 12.5 years and 13.0 years, respectively). A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was inversely associated with total stroke in men but not in women. In men, a high Index score (=4) was also inversely associated with total ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.86), large-artery atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.92) and small artery occlusion (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.84) compared to a low Index score (
PubMed ID
30356304 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines and risk of myocardial infarction: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299380
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Anne Tjønneland
Erik Thorlund Parner
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
1Section for Epidemiology,Department of Public Health,Aarhus University,Bartholins Allé 2,DK-8000 Aarhus C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A direct way to evaluate food-based dietary guidelines is to assess if adherence is associated with development of non-communicable diseases. Thus, the objective was to develop an index to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines and to investigate the association between adherence to the index and risk of myocardial infarction (MI).
Population-based cohort study with recruitment of participants in 1993-1997. Information on dietary intake was collected at baseline using an FFQ and an index ranging from 0 to 6 points was created to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines. MI cases were identified by record linkage to the Danish National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI.
Greater areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women aged 50-64 years (n 55 021) from the Diet, Cancer and Health study.
A total of 3046 participants were diagnosed with first-time MI during a median follow-up of 16·9 years. A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was associated with a lower risk of MI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard of MI was 13 % lower among men with a score of 3-
PubMed ID
29331164 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue content of alpha-linolenic acid and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes: A Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297397
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christian Sørensen Bork
Stine Krogh Venø
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Anne Tjønneland
Philip C Calder
Kim Overvad
Erik Berg Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking
Stroke - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Waist Circumference
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
The plant-derived omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
We have investigated associations between the content of ALA in adipose tissue and the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes.
Incident cases of ischemic stroke among participants enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n = 57,053) were identified by linkage with the Danish National Patient Register. Subsequently, all potential cases were validated and classified into ischemic stroke subtypes. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was determined by gas chromatography in cases and in a randomly drawn sub-cohort (n = 3500). Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Cox regression.
During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, 1735 cases of total ischemic stroke were identified including 297 cases of large artery atherosclerosis, 772 cases of small-vessel occlusion, 99 cases of cardio-embolism, 91 cases with stroke of other etiology and 476 cases with stroke of undetermined etiology. The median content of ALA in adipose tissue within the sub-cohort was 0.84% (95% central range: 0.53-1.19%). Multivariable analyses showed a U-shaped association between adipose tissue content of ALA and the rate of total ischemic stroke, but this association was not statistically significant (p = 0.172). In analyses of ischemic stroke subtypes, we observed a statistically significant U-shaped association between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis (p = 0.017), whereas no appreciable association was observed between ALA and the rate of small-vessel occlusion (p = 0.427). A positive but statistically non-significant association was observed between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to cardio-embolism (p = 0.162).
The content of ALA in adipose tissue was statistically non-significantly U-shaped associated with risk of total ischemic stroke. For ischemic stroke subtypes a statistically significant, U-shaped association with large artery atherosclerosis was observed.
PubMed ID
29889889 View in PubMed
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Adult Scandinavians' use of powered scooters: user satisfaction, frequency of use, and prediction of daily use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295765
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Terje Sund
Åse Brandt
Author Affiliation
a Department of Assistive Technology , The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Electric Power Supplies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To investigate user satisfaction with characteristics of powered scooters (scooters), frequency of use, and factors predicting daily scooter use.
Cross-sectional.
Adult scooter users (n?=?59) in Denmark and Norway, mean age 74.5 (standard deviation 12.3) years.
Structured face-to-face interviews. The NOMO 1.0, the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive devices (QUEST 2.0), and a study specific instrument were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics were applied, and regression analyzes were used to investigate predictors for daily scooter use. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) served as a framework for classifying variables and guiding the investigation.
Satisfaction with the scooter characteristics was high with most participants being very satisfied or quite satisfied (66.1-91.5%). Most scooters were used daily (36.2%) or several times a week (50.0%). User satisfaction with safety of the scooter [odds ratio (OR)?=?11.76, confidence interval (CI)?=?1.70-81.28] and reduced balance (OR?=?5.63, CI?=?0.90-35.39) increased the likelihood of daily use, while reduced function in back and/or legs (OR?=?.04, CI?=?0.00-0.75), tiredness (OR?=?.06, CI?=?0.01-0.51), and increased age (OR?=?.93, CI?=?0.87-1.00) reduced the likelihood of daily use. 52.8% of the variance was explained by these variables.
User satisfaction was high, and most scooters were used frequently. User satisfaction with safety, specific functional limitations and age were predictors for daily scooter use. Implications for Rehabilitation Scooters seem to be a beneficial intervention for people with mobility impairment: user satisfaction and frequency of use are high. Users' subjective feeling of safety should be secured in the service delivery process in order to support safe and frequent scooter use. Training of scooter skills should be considered in the service delivery process.
PubMed ID
28366104 View in PubMed
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Advanced paternal age and stillbirth rate: a nationwide register-based cohort study of 944,031 pregnancies in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289812
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 03; 32(3):227-234
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
Stine Kjaer Urhoj
Per Kragh Andersen
Laust Hvas Mortensen
George Davey Smith
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 5, POB 2099, 1014, Copenhagen K, Denmark. stur@sund.ku.dk.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 03; 32(3):227-234
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced paternal age has been associated with a variety of rare conditions and diseases of great public health impact. An increased number of de novo point mutations in sperm with increasing age have been suggested as a mechanism, which would likely also affect fetal viability. We examined the association between paternal age and stillbirth rate in a large nationwide cohort. We identified all pregnancies in Denmark from 1994 to 2010 carried to a gestational age of at least 22 completed weeks (n = 944,031) as registered in national registers and linked to individual register data about the parents. The hazard ratio of stillbirth according to paternal age was estimated, adjusted for maternal age in 1-year categories, year of outcome, and additionally parental educational levels. The relative rate of stillbirth (n = 4946) according to paternal age was found to be J-shaped with the highest hazard ratio for fathers aged more than 40 years when paternal age was modelled using restricted cubic splines. When modelled categorically, the adjusted hazard ratios of stillbirth were as follows:
Notes
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PubMed ID
28271174 View in PubMed
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An adult-based insulin resistance genetic risk score associates with insulin resistance, metabolic traits and altered fat distribution in Danish children and adolescents who are overweight or obese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297400
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 08; 61(8):1769-1779
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Anne-Sofie Graae
Mette Hollensted
Julie T Kloppenborg
Yuvaraj Mahendran
Theresia M Schnurr
Emil Vincent R Appel
Johanne Rask
Tenna R H Nielsen
Mia Ø Johansen
Allan Linneberg
Marit E Jørgensen
Niels Grarup
Haja N Kadarmideen
Birgitte Holst
Oluf Pedersen
Jens-Christian Holm
Torben Hansen
Author Affiliation
Section for Metabolic Receptology, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 08; 61(8):1769-1779
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Metabolic Syndrome - metabolism
Middle Aged
Overweight - genetics
Pediatric Obesity - genetics
Phenotype
Risk
Abstract
A genetic risk score (GRS) consisting of 53 insulin resistance variants (GRS53) was recently demonstrated to associate with insulin resistance in adults. We speculated that the GRS53 might already associate with insulin resistance during childhood, and we therefore aimed to investigate this in populations of Danish children and adolescents. Furthermore, we aimed to address whether the GRS associates with components of the metabolic syndrome and altered body composition in children and adolescents.
We examined a total of 689 children and adolescents who were overweight or obese and 675 children and adolescents from a population-based study. Anthropometric data, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans, BP, fasting plasma glucose, fasting serum insulin and fasting plasma lipid measurements were obtained, and HOMA-IR was calculated. The GRS53 was examined for association with metabolic traits in children by linear regressions using an additive genetic model.
In overweight/obese children and adolescents, the GRS53 associated with higher HOMA-IR (ß?=?0.109?±?0.050 (SE); p?=?2.73?×?10-2), fasting plasma glucose (ß?=?0.010?±?0.005 mmol/l; p?=?2.51?×?10-2) and systolic BP SD score (ß?=?0.026?±?0.012; p?=?3.32?×?10-2) as well as lower HDL-cholesterol (ß?=?-0.008?±?0.003 mmol/l; p?=?1.23?×?10-3), total fat-mass percentage (ß?=?-0.143?±?0.054%; p?=?9.15?×?10-3) and fat-mass percentage in the legs (ß?=?-0.197?±?0.055%; p?=?4.09?×?10-4). In the population-based sample of children, the GRS53 only associated with lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations (ß?=?-0.007?±?0.003 mmol/l; p?=?1.79?×?10-2).
An adult-based GRS comprising 53 insulin resistance susceptibility SNPs associates with insulin resistance, markers of the metabolic syndrome and altered fat distribution in a sample of Danish children and adolescents who were overweight or obese.
PubMed ID
29855666 View in PubMed
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Analysis of multi-level spatial data reveals strong synchrony in seasonal influenza epidemics across Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296603
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0197519
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Sinead E Morris
Birgitte Freiesleben de Blasio
Cécile Viboud
Amy Wesolowski
Ottar N Bjørnstad
Bryan T Grenfell
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0197519
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Climate
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemics
Geography, Medical
Global health
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission
Meteorological Concepts
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Wavelet Analysis
Abstract
Population structure, spatial diffusion, and climatic conditions mediate the spatiotemporal spread of seasonal influenza in temperate regions. However, much of our knowledge of these dynamics stems from a few well-studied countries, such as the United States (US), and the extent to which this applies in different demographic and climatic environments is not fully understood. Using novel data from Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, we applied wavelet analysis and non-parametric spatial statistics to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of influenza transmission at regional and international scales. We found the timing and amplitude of epidemics were highly synchronized both within and between countries, despite the geographical isolation of many areas in our study. Within Norway, this synchrony was most strongly modulated by population size, confirming previous findings that hierarchical spread between larger populations underlies seasonal influenza dynamics at regional levels. However, we found no such association when comparing across countries, suggesting that other factors become important at the international scale. Finally, to frame our results within a wider global context, we compared our findings from Norway to those from the US. After correcting for differences in geographic scale, we unexpectedly found higher levels of synchrony in Norway, despite its smaller population size. We hypothesize that this greater synchrony may be driven by more favorable and spatially uniform climatic conditions, although there are other likely factors we were unable to consider (such as reduced variation in school term times and differences in population movements). Overall, our results highlight the importance of comparing influenza spread at different spatial scales and across diverse geographic regions in order to better understand the complex mechanisms underlying disease dynamics.
PubMed ID
29771952 View in PubMed
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An estimate of the effect of waiting time in the Danish asylum system on post-resettlement employment among refugees: Separating the pure delay effect from the effects of the conditions under which refugees are waiting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299310
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206737
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Camilla Hvidtfeldt
Marie Louise Schultz-Nielsen
Erdal Tekin
Mogens Fosgerau
Author Affiliation
The ROCKWOOL Foundation Research Unit, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206737
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Young Adult
Abstract
We provide an estimate of the effect of refugees' length of waiting time in the Danish asylum system on their subsequent employment using administrative data. In contrast to previous studies, we take into account that refugees' labor market integration is delayed since their labor market access is restricted during the asylum-seeking phase. We find that an additional year of waiting time decreases subsequent employment by 3.2 percentage points on average. This effect is mostly driven by the delay in the labor market engagement among refugees. Waiting time may have an effect on subsequent employment that is additional to the delay effect, and this could be either positive or negative depending on the nature of the conditions under which asylum seekers live while waiting for their cases to be processed. We find that this additional effect is positive and statistically significant until observable individual characteristics are included, at which point it becomes small in magnitude and no longer significant.
PubMed ID
30408069 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.