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1816 records – page 1 of 182.

1951 census in the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3
Source
Arctic. 7:52-54.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1954
Source
Arctic. 7:52-54.
Date
1954
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Demography
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1455.
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Aboriginal youth in Canada: a profile based upon 1981 census data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39493
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
G E Priest
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Canada
Censuses
Comparative Study
Culture
Demography
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Income
Indians, North American
Industry
North America
Occupations
Population
Population Characteristics
Research
Unemployment
Abstract
An analysis of the data from the 1981 census of Canada is presented concerning the aboriginal population aged 15 to 24, defined as including the Inuit, status Indian, non-status Indian, and Metis populations. Comparisons are made with the non-aboriginal population. Factors considered include geographic location, migration, family status, dependent children, educational status, labor force participation, unemployment, income, and industry.
PubMed ID
12340640 View in PubMed
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Abuse of and dependence on alcohol in Swedish women: role of education, occupation and family structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10814
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
K L Thundal
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden. Kajsa-Lena.Thundal@socmed.gu.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Demography
Divorce
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Marriage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study, which is part of a multipurpose study on alcohol use among women, focuses on the association between education, occupation, family structure and development of alcohol dependence or abuse in women. A total of 316 women were selected by stratified random sampling from all women in a defined part of Gothenburg, Sweden. In a face to face interview, questions were asked about occupation, education, family structure and other variables reflecting socioeconomic conditions and relations within the family. As outcome measures we used alcohol dependence and abuse (ADA), diagnosed in a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R). We found that never having been married, or having poor communication with the spouse, as well as having no children at home to take care of, were strongly associated with ADA in women. The role of social class depended on whether education or occupation was used as a measure. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that development of alcohol-related problems among women to a large extent is influenced by matters that relate to home and private life.
PubMed ID
9766171 View in PubMed
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Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):753-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Tanya Jukkala
Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen
Author Affiliation
Baltic and East European Graduate School, Södertörn University, 141 89, Huddinge, Sweden. tanya.jukkala@sh.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):753-65
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Demography
Ethics
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Religion
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Attitudes concerning the acceptability of suicide have been emphasized as being important for understanding why levels of suicide mortality vary in different societies across the world. While Russian suicide mortality levels are among the highest in the world, not much is known about attitudes to suicide in Russia. This study aims to obtain a greater understanding about the levels and correlates of suicide acceptance in Russia.
Data from a survey of 1,190 Muscovites were analysed using logistic regression techniques. Suicide acceptance was examined among respondents in relation to social, economic and demographic factors as well as in relation to attitudes towards other moral questions.
The majority of interviewees (80%) expressed condemnatory attitudes towards suicide, although men were slightly less condemning. The young, the higher educated, and the non-religious were more accepting of suicide (OR > 2). However, the two first-mentioned effects disappeared when controlling for tolerance, while a positive effect of lower education on suicide acceptance appeared. When controlling for other independent variables, no significant effects were found on suicide attitudes by gender, one's current family situation, or by health-related or economic problems.
The most important determinants of the respondents' attitudes towards suicide were their tolerance regarding other moral questions and their religiosity. More tolerant views, in general, also seemed to explain the more accepting views towards suicide among the young and the higher educated. Differences in suicide attitudes between the sexes seemed to be dependent on differences in other factors rather than on gender per se. Suicide attitudes also seemed to be more affected by one's earlier experiences in terms of upbringing and socialization than by events and processes later in life.
PubMed ID
21110001 View in PubMed
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Access and coverage of needle and syringe programmes (NSP) in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84779
Source
Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Aceijas Carmen
Hickman Matthew
Donoghoe Martin C
Burrows Dave
Stuikyte Raminta
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Drugs and Health Behaviour (CRDHB), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Department of Public Health and Policy, London, UK.
Source
Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1244-50
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Demography
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hepatitis C - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate access, activity and coverage of needle and syringe programmes (NSP) in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. METHODS: Two data sets ('regional' and 'high-coverage sites') were used to estimate NSP provision (availability/number of sites), NSP utilization (syringes distributed/year), needle and syringe distribution (needles/syringes distributed/IDU/year), IDU reached (number/percentage of IDU contacted/year), regular reach (five or more contacts/month) and syringe coverage (percentage of injections/IDU/year administrable with new injecting equipment). RESULTS: Regional data set: results from 213 sites in 25 countries suggested that Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and Ukraine had > 10 NSP during 2001/2. Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Russia, Slovakia and Ukraine had >or= 10,000 IDU in contact with NSP. Ten countries reached >or= 10% of the estimated IDU population. The 25 countries distributed approximately 17 million syringes/needles. Eight countries distributed > 0.5 million syringes/year. Syringe coverage (assuming 400 injections/IDU/year) was 15% in Macedonia. Overall syringe coverage was 1.2% and when assuming 700 injections/IDU/year it decreased to 0.7%. Syringe coverage for the IDU population in contact with NSP was 60% in Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova and Tajikistan. Overall syringe coverage for the population in contact with NSP was 9.8%. High-coverage data set: Soligorsk, Pskov and Sumy's NSP reached 92.3%, 92.2% and 73.3% of their estimated IDU population, respectively (regular reach: 0.2%, 1.8% and 22.7%). The distribution levels were 47.2, 51.7 and 94.2 syringes/IDU/year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The evidence suggests suboptimal levels of NSP implementation, programme activity and coverage. This paper provides a baseline for development of indicators that could be used to monitor NSP. Strategies to increase coverage that may go beyond NSP are urgently required, as is research into understanding how NSP can contribute to better syringe coverage among IDU.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1179-8017624968
PubMed ID
17565564 View in PubMed
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[Achievement of goal resting heart rate in patients with stable angina and hypertension at the background of therapy with -adrenoblockers in real clinical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106918
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(7):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Zh D Kobalava
G K Kiiakbaev
Iu V Khomitskaia
A A Shavarov
Author Affiliation
Russian University of Peoples Friendship, ul. Mikluho-Maklaya, 6,117198 Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(7):13-23
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Angina, Stable - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Demography
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Monitoring
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
ß-Adrenoblockers improve quality of life and in a number of cases life prognosis in patients with stable angina (SA). Dose of -adrenoblockers is considered optimal if at the background of treatment resting heart rate (rHR) is persistently decreased down to 55-60 bpm. But according to data of international registries rate of achievement of target rHR (trHR) in real clinical practice does not exceed 22%. Aim of this study was to determine what portion of patients with SA and arterial hypertension (AH) achieves trHR at the background of therapy with -adrenoblockers in routine practice in this country. Twenty centers in 6 towns in Russian Federation recruited 399 patients (mean age 64+/-10 years) with class I-III angina and concomitant primary AH. These patients for at least 2 months received any -adrenoblocker and did not change its dose during 4 weeks before inclusion into the program. Portion of patients with trHR was 15.5%. There were no significant differences between average daily doses of most frequently used -adrenoblockers (metoprolol, bisoprolol, carvediolol) in groups of patients who achieved and did not achieve trHR. Quality of life of patients who achieved was comparable with that of those who did not achieve trHR. Attainment of trHR was associated with significant decrease of short acting requirement nitrates. There was a significant direct correlation between attainment of trHR and target arterial pressure.
PubMed ID
24087955 View in PubMed
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Active and passive surveillance and phylogenetic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi elucidate the process of Lyme disease risk emergence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143987
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Nicholas H Ogden
Catherine Bouchard
Klaus Kurtenbach
Gabriele Margos
L Robbin Lindsay
Louise Trudel
Soulyvane Nguon
François Milord
Author Affiliation
Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada. nicholas_ogden@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Borrelia burgdorferi - classification - genetics
Cluster analysis
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - microbiology
Demography
Genetic Variation
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Phylogeny
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Rodentia - parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - veterinary
Abstract
Northward expansion of the tick Ixodes scapularis is driving Lyme disease (LD) emergence in Canada. Information on mechanisms involved is needed to enhance surveillance and identify where LD risk is emerging.
We used passive and active surveillance and phylogeographic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi to investigate LD risk emergence in Quebec.
In active surveillance, we collected ticks from the environment and from captured rodents. B. burgdorferi transmission was detected by serological analysis of rodents and by polymerase chain reaction assays of ticks. Spatiotemporal trends in passive surveillance data assisted interpretation of active surveillance. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of B. burgdorferi in ticks identified likely source locations of B. burgdorferi.
In active surveillance, we found I. scapularis at 55% of sites, and we were more likely to find them at sites with a warmer climate. B. burgdorferi was identified at 13 I. scapularis-positive sites, but infection prevalence in ticks and animal hosts was low. Low infection prevalence in ticks submitted in passive surveillance after 2004-from the tick-positive regions identified in active surveillance-coincided with an exponential increase in tick submissions during this time. MLST analysis suggested recent introduction of B. burgdorferi from the northeastern United States.
These data are consistent with I. scapularis ticks dispersed from the United States by migratory birds, founding populations where the climate is warmest, and then establishment of B. burgdorferi from the United States several years after I. scapularis have established. These observations provide vital information for public health to minimize the impact of LD in Canada.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:2418498647
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Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Feb;8(2):115-2111897061
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A30520601318
PubMed ID
20421192 View in PubMed
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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Act respecting the family allowance for children, No. 147, 19 March 1986, and Act respecting children's allowances and the advance payment of children's subsidies, No. 350, 4 June 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38576
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aid to Families with Dependent Children
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Policy
Geography
Legislation
Population
Public Policy
Residence Characteristics
Scandinavia
Abstract
In 1986, Denmark's family allowance scheme was modified by these two Acts with effect from 1 July 1987. The regular allowance and the youth allowance were abolished by the second Act and replaced by the first Act with a single allowance "for children in the family" payable with respect to every child under the age of 18. The new allowance is payable quarterly and set at DKr 1250 per quarter. Payment of the allowance is taxable in Denmark, but no longer conditional on the child being permanently resident in Denmark. Allowances are no longer dependent on the income of parents and are adjusted by a percentage fixed by law every year, rather than by the cost of living.
PubMed ID
12289714 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
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1816 records – page 1 of 182.