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[Admission patterns of patients with dementia to psychiatric hospitals. A registry study over the period 1972-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217296
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Sep 26;156(39):5657-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1994
Author
L. Sørensen
P B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for psykiatrisk demografi, Psykiatrisk Hospital i Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Sep 26;156(39):5657-61
Date
Sep-26-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Dementia - therapy
Denmark
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Registries
Abstract
This paper describes the admission and discharge pattern in Danish psychiatric hospitals for first-ever admitted demented patients (290, 293.09, 293.19 ICD-8) aged 65 years and over admitted in the period 1972 to 1988. The results are based on data from the Danish Psychiatric Register. The admission rate, the commitment rate and the length of stay decreased significantly from 1972 to 1988. The readmission frequency did not change during the period. A significantly increasing proportion of the patients were admitted from somatic hospitals, and there was a tendency to a higher discharge rate to somatic hospitals. Two factors may have caused the decline in admission rate, the improvement of the psychogeriatric services in the eighties and the decline in the number of psychiatric beds. The psychiatric hospitals no longer serve as nursing homes for demented patients. The results also seem to indicate that for institutional care for demented patients may have been transferred from the psychiatric hospitals to other services e.g. the somatic departments and nursing homes.
PubMed ID
7985246 View in PubMed
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[Ambulatory psychiatric care at the elderly patient's home].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103272
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 29;152(5):297-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1990
Author
N C Gulmann
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 29;152(5):297-8
Date
Jan-29-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Dementia - therapy
Denmark
Geriatric Psychiatry
Health Services for the Aged
Home Care Services
Humans
PubMed ID
2301075 View in PubMed
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An investigation of videoconferenced geriatric medicine grand rounds in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180710
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(2):104-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Keith Sclater
Kannayiram Alagiakrishnan
Anne Sclater
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(2):104-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dementia - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods - standards
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Health
Telemedicine - standards
Urban health
Abstract
Geriatric medicine grand rounds (GMGR) from the University of Alberta are videoconferenced weekly to health-care providers at up to 9 urban and 14 rural sites across Alberta. A questionnaire was given to all participants attending 20 consecutive GMGR presentations from January 2002. The response rate was 85% (n = 625) for all participants and 99% (n = 123) for physicians alone. The audience was composed of registered nurses (42%), physicians (17%) and other health-care professionals. 'Interest in topic' was cited by 95% as the main reason for attendance. Doctors and nurses cited continuing medical education as an additional factor. The highest attendance was for the topics vascular dementia, behavioural problems in dementia, the genetics of dementia and falls prevention. Participants at the remote sites gave lower evaluations of quality of the GMGR presentations than those at the hub site. The measurement, care and treatment of dementia appeared to be the main concerns of health-care providers across the province. The videoconferencing of GMGR appears to be an effective method of meeting the demands of physicians and allied health professionals for education in geriatric medicine.
PubMed ID
15068647 View in PubMed
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[A special psychogeriatric admission unit gives better care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238229
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Oct 2;82(40):3388-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-1985
Author
R. Adolfsson
L. Berglund
P O Sandman
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Oct 2;82(40):3388-91
Date
Oct-2-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dementia - therapy
Geriatric Psychiatry
Humans
Patient Admission
Sweden
PubMed ID
4058122 View in PubMed
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[A trial of psychogeriatric day care at a long-term geriatric care clinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245609
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jul 9;77(28-29):2511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-9-1980
Author
H. Zetterqvist
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jul 9;77(28-29):2511-3
Date
Jul-9-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Day Care
Dementia - therapy
Humans
Long-Term Care
Mental health services
Sweden
PubMed ID
6777614 View in PubMed
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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for dementia care: training program to develop primary care memory clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132982
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Linda Lee
M Janet Kasperski
W Wayne Weston
Author Affiliation
The Centre for Family Medicine, 10 B Victoria St S, Kitchener, ON N2G 1C5. joelinda5@rogers.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e249-52
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Dementia - therapy
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Ontario
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Abstract
Currently, dementia care provided by family physicians is suboptimal and access to specialist resources is limited. With the aging population, there is a need for system-wide, programmatic interventions to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with memory difficulties. The development of primary care memory clinics addresses this need.
The Memory Clinic Training Program aims to develop highly functioning interprofessional memory clinics that assist family physicians in providing improved care for patients with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment.
The interprofessional training program consists of a 2-day case-based workshop, 1 day of observership and clinical training at the Centre for Family Medicine Memory Clinic, and 2 days of on-site mentorship at each newly formed memory clinic.
The Memory Clinic Training Program is an accredited, comprehensive program designed to assist family practice groups with developing primary care memory clinics. These clinics aim to transform the current limited practice capability of individual family physicians into a systematic, comprehensive, interprofessional health care service that improves capacity and quality of primary care for patients with cognitive impairment and dementia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21753083 View in PubMed
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Canadian guidelines for the development of antidementia therapies: a conceptual summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215917
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1995 Feb;22(1):62-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
E. Mohr
H. Feldman
S. Gauthier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa/Royal Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1995 Feb;22(1):62-71
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis
Canada
Cognition
Dementia - therapy
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
The magnitude of the problems faced by Canadian society as a result of an aging population has been identified. Perhaps the most important concern related to this greying of Canada is the increasing incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Therapeutic options for these disorders have been limited to date. Advances in biotechnology and molecular biology will offer novel approaches to treatment. These and the expansion of more traditional therapeutic avenues require guidelines with the aim of optimizing their development.
PubMed ID
7750079 View in PubMed
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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Care provider perspectives on end-of-life care in long-term-care homes: implications for whole-person and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141476
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):122-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Joanie Sims-Gould
Elaine Wiersma
Lise Arseneau
Mary Lou Kelley
Jean Kozak
Sonja Habjan
Michael MacLean
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, 315-2647 Willow Street, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9. simsg@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):122-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Dementia - therapy
Holistic Nursing
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Long-Term Care
Nursing Homes
Ontario
Palliative Care
Professional-Patient Relations
Terminal Care
Workload
Abstract
This study holistically explores the experience of dying and end-of-life care for older persons with dementia in long-term care (LTC) from the perspective of care providers. Using a focused ethnography methodology, seven researchers interviewed LTC staff, residents' families, volunteers, management staff, and spiritual advisers/clergy over a five-day period. Research was guided by two key questions: What is the dying experience of people living in LTC from the perspective of different care providers? and, What are the salient issues in providing palliative care for elderly people dying in LTC? Based on a thematic analysis of verbatim data, three common themes were identified: tension between completing job tasks on time and "being there" for residents; the importance of family-like bonds between front-line staff and residents; and the importance of communication among staff and between staff and residents and their families at the end of life. Findings are discussed in relation to their implications for policies and practices that can support whole-person care and ultimately a good death for residents of LTC facilities.
PubMed ID
20718397 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.