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[6 months after psychiatric hospitalization. Discharged patients have no housing ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217704
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994
Author
L. Bogren
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Date
Jul-27-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - nursing - psychology - therapy
Housing
Humans
Length of Stay
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology - therapy
Patient Discharge
Social Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
8057734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abilities and activities of patients with dementia in day hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227113
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L. Borell
P O Sandman
B. Winblad
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(1):49-55
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Day Care - organization & administration - standards
Dementia - nursing - physiopathology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Sweden
Abstract
The proportion of individuals with dementia is increasing in all kinds of institutions. Specialised day hospitals are now being developed as an alternative to long term care for the demented. Twelve day hospital wards, with 312 individuals suffering from dementia, were included in a study aiming to assess functional abilities and frequencies of participation in different activities. Eighty-nine per cent of the day hospital patients could be classified as having a dementia disease. Seventy-eight per cent of the population were dependent on some kind of help from a caregiver in the performance of ADL activities. The most common occupations that could be seen in the programmes were physical activities, entertainment, and personal care activities. The activities were often undertaken as large group activities, often including more than ten patients. The functional abilities that characterise the population are comparable with those of the population living in pensioners' service blocks with full board.
PubMed ID
2011673 View in PubMed
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Abuse is in the eye of the beholder. Report by family members about abuse of demented persons in home care. A total population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73259
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M. Grafström
A. Nordberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - nursing
Elder Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based study 219 family members of cognitively impaired elderly (casegroup) and 255 family members of cognitively healthy elderly (control-group) were interviewed about their situation as a caregiver to an old person. Twenty-six family members in the case-group reported abusive behavior in the care of the elderly at home. These family members are compared with 154 family members in the control-group, reporting other coping strategies than abusive. In the abusive group most of the elderly were in a mild stage of dementia, and the family members reported more strain in the care situation. The family members were older, judged their health as deteriorated, and were mostly living together with the dependent elderly.
PubMed ID
8310277 View in PubMed
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Always one step behind: husbands' narratives about taking care of their demented wives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180713
Source
Health (London). 2004 Apr;8(2):159-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Tapio Kirsi
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Finland. tapio.kirsi@uta.fi
Source
Health (London). 2004 Apr;8(2):159-81
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - nursing
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men - psychology
Narration
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
Based on an analysis of extracts from 11 free-form written texts and 13 focused interviews with Finnish husbands who had given care to their demented wives, this study was aimed at finding out how husbands signify their action as spousal caregivers. The data were approached qualitatively from a social constructionistic point of view. Husbands' written material described their action of caregiving mainly in a passive voice that echoed duty and responsive agency. Analysis of the interview talk revealed a wider spectrum of voices and more agentive talk about caregiving. The results of the study challenge interpretations of men as either ineffective or capable caregivers and highlight, instead, the contextual nature of the way that men construct their agencies, depending upon the purposes and audiences of their narration.
PubMed ID
15068635 View in PubMed
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The amount of informal and formal care among non-demented and demented elderly persons-results from a Swedish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70588
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;20(9):862-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
G. Nordberg
E. von Strauss
I. Kåreholt
L. Johansson
A. Wimo
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center (ARC), Box 6401, 113 82 Stockholm, Sweden. Gunilla.Nordberg@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;20(9):862-71
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - nursing
Dementia - nursing - psychology
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Home Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Developed countries are experiencing a dramatic increase in the proportion of elderly persons, as well as a progressive aging of the elderly population itself. Knowledge regarding the amount of formal and informal care and its interaction at population-based level is limited. OBJECTIVES: To describe the amount of formal and informal care for non-demented and demented persons living at home in a population-based sample. METHODS: The population consisted of all inhabitants, 75 + years, living in a rural community (n = 740). They were clinically examined by physicians and interviewed by nurses. Dementia severity was measured according to Washington University Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Informal and formal care was examined with the RUD (Resource Utilization in Dementia) instrument. RESULTS: The amount of informal care was much greater than formal care and also greater among demented than non-demented. There was a relationship between the severity of the cognitive decline and the amount of informal care while this pattern was weaker regarding formal care. Tobit regression analyses showed a clear association between the number of hours of informal and formal care and cognitive decline although this pattern was much stronger for informal than formal care. CONCLUSIONS: Informal care substitutes rather than compliments formal care and highlights the importance of future studies in order to truly estimate the amount of informal and formal care and the interaction between them. This knowledge will be of importance when planning the use of limited resources, and when supporting informal carers in their effort to care for their intimates.
PubMed ID
16116583 View in PubMed
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An international perspective of active euthanasia: attitudes of nurses in seven countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23962
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1993 Aug;30(4):301-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
A J Davis
B. Davidson
M. Hirschfield
S. Lauri
J Y Lin
A. Norberg
L. Phillips
E. Pitman
C H Shen
R. Vander Laan
Author Affiliation
University of California, San Francisco.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1993 Aug;30(4):301-10
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Australia
Canada
China
Dementia - nursing
Ethics, Nursing
Euthanasia - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Euthanasia, Active
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary
Finland
Humans
Internationality
Israel
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing, Supervisory - statistics & numerical data
Religion
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This exploratory study examines the ethical justification that cancer care and dementia care nurses gave for active voluntary euthanasia. A convenient sample of 319 nurses working in seven countries was interviewed using a structured interview guide. The great majority of the nurses could not ethically justify active voluntary euthanasia. Even if the law changed, only 96 of the total sample viewed active voluntary euthanasia as ethical. For those nurses who could ethically justify active voluntary euthanasia, the majority did so because of the patients' suffering.
PubMed ID
8375973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appreciative inquiry in a Norwegian nursing home: a unifying and maturing process to forward new knowledge and new practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309679
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Inger-Lise Magnussen
Johanne Alteren
Terese Bondas
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences , Nord University , Bodø , Norway.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Dementia - nursing
Group Processes
Health Personnel
Humans
Knowledge
Norway
Nursing - methods
Nursing Homes
Nursing Research - methods
Research Design
Research Personnel
Abstract
Appreciative inquiry (AI) studies have proven to be useful in developing nursing knowledge and changing nursing practice. However, few AI studies have examined the meaning of participation over time among collaborating healthcare providers. Our aim was to explore and illuminate healthcare providers' participation over time in a Norwegian nursing home to develop new knowledge and practice, focusing on sensory gardens.
Twenty healthcare providers participated in the 3 year AI study. Data were collected in fieldwork, interviews, and interventions. Saldañas' longitudinal analysis was applied.
The collaboration between the researcher and participants created insight of a relational room, which was named "the room of closeness". Participants' search for new arenas to apply the meaning of the room of closeness was found when focusing on the sensory garden. Their desire for joint development created a bottom-up perspective, the hallmark of successful AI.
Knowledge of participants' experiences may contribute to developing AI as a useful and transferable method, especially regarding co-creating participation, and may have implications for research and society. AI's strength-based approach may, however, lead to the neglect of data that are associated with problems, and complicate the assessment of success. Further research is therefore needed to develop AI.
PubMed ID
30623735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appreciative inquiry in a Norwegian nursing home: a unifying and maturing process to forward new knowledge and new practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302508
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Inger-Lise Magnussen
Johanne Alteren
Terese Bondas
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences , Nord University , Bodø , Norway.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Dementia - nursing
Group Processes
Health Personnel
Humans
Knowledge
Norway
Nursing - methods
Nursing Homes
Nursing Research - methods
Research Design
Research Personnel
Abstract
Appreciative inquiry (AI) studies have proven to be useful in developing nursing knowledge and changing nursing practice. However, few AI studies have examined the meaning of participation over time among collaborating healthcare providers. Our aim was to explore and illuminate healthcare providers' participation over time in a Norwegian nursing home to develop new knowledge and practice, focusing on sensory gardens.
Twenty healthcare providers participated in the 3 year AI study. Data were collected in fieldwork, interviews, and interventions. Saldañas' longitudinal analysis was applied.
The collaboration between the researcher and participants created insight of a relational room, which was named "the room of closeness". Participants' search for new arenas to apply the meaning of the room of closeness was found when focusing on the sensory garden. Their desire for joint development created a bottom-up perspective, the hallmark of successful AI.
Knowledge of participants' experiences may contribute to developing AI as a useful and transferable method, especially regarding co-creating participation, and may have implications for research and society. AI's strength-based approach may, however, lead to the neglect of data that are associated with problems, and complicate the assessment of success. Further research is therefore needed to develop AI.
PubMed ID
30623735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing informal caregivers' experiences: a qualitative and psychometric evaluation of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93554
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2008 Mar;17(2):189-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Persson C.
Wennman-Larsen A.
Sundin K.
Gustavsson P.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. carina.persson@ki.se
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2008 Mar;17(2):189-99
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - nursing
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing
Personal Satisfaction
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
With the aim to evaluate the Swedish version of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale (CRA), informal caregivers (n = 209) to individuals with a malignant disease, dementia or a physical impairment were recruited. The CRA was developed in the USA and is a self-rating questionnaire consisting of five subscales, measuring family members' reactions to the experience of caring for a relative with mental or physical illnesses. Data were analysed using psychometric and qualitative methods. Findings indicated good internal consistency, and a factor analysis confirmed the structure with five subscales; however, an overlap of items between the subscales was found. A content analysis of respondents' comments indicated that there were problems due to presuppositions inherent in the questions and with the meaning of words. Problems regarding inclusion/exclusion aspects in some concepts were also found. Two aspects of caregiver reactions were found to be missing or only partly covered: worrying and positive experiences. Results from this study suggest that the Swedish version is useful for assessment of caregiver reactions but needs further refinement.
PubMed ID
18302657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing support needs of caregivers of persons with dementia: who wants what?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194138
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2001 Jun;37(3):231-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A. Colantonio
C. Cohen
M. Pon
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. angela.colantonio@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2001 Jun;37(3):231-43
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - nursing
Female
Health Care Surveys
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Internet - utilization
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Periodicals as Topic - utilization
Social Support
Telephone - utilization
Abstract
This paper documents the use and interest in support strategies such as telephone support, newsletters, and computer services, among caregivers of all ages. Data obtained from telephone interviews with community living caregivers of persons with dementia (n = 148) showed substantial interest in the use of these types of services. Using a theoretical framework, this paper identifies caregiver and care-receiver characteristics associated with those interested in the utilization of these support strategies. The implications of these findings for program planning and future research are discussed.
PubMed ID
11440424 View in PubMed
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211 records – page 1 of 22.