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AIDS and dementia: a quantitative neuropsychological study of unselected Danish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8682
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1987 Dec;76(6):443-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
P. Bruhn
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1987 Dec;76(6):443-7
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications - psychology
Adult
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Dementia - etiology - psychology
Denmark
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Retrospective studies of hospitalized patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) have indicated that dementia occur in the majority of cases. In order to study the occurrence of dementia among AIDS patients, we conducted a controlled study of 16 unselected cases with a battery of neuropsychological tests known to be sensitive to brain damage of various etiologies. Except for fatigue, mental complaints and neuropsychiatric signs of dementia were generally sparse. As a group, the AIDS patients' performance in the neuropsychological tests did not differ from that of matched, healthy controls. Based on analyses of individual test results only one patient performed significantly inferior to what should be expected. The diagnosis of dementia should not be ascribed to AIDS victims on account of non-specific psycho-behavioral deviations that may represent a normal psychologic reaction to the disease, extreme fatigue, or both. Further, frequency measures of dementia in AIDS, based on large, unselected groups and with sufficient control, are still lacking. However, our study indicates that dementia is a less frequent complication of AIDS than so far assumed.
PubMed ID
3434202 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol related disease in a neuromedical department in 1965-1975]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13144
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Jul 18;139(29):1749-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-1977
Source
Lancet. 1996 Mar 2;347(9001):573-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1996
Author
I. Raiha
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
T. Rajala
L. Sourander
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Lancet. 1996 Mar 2;347(9001):573-8
Date
Mar-2-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - etiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Dementia - etiology - genetics
Dementia, Vascular - etiology - genetics
Diseases in Twins
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The genetics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are obscure. Although most cases are sporadic half the patients with sporadic AD have a positive family history. The mode of genetic transmission and the role of environmental factors are unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of genetic factors to the pathogenesis of AD in a twin cohort.
The Finnish Twin Cohort consists of all Finnish same-sexed twin pairs born before 1958 with both co-twins alive in 1975. The total number of twin pairs is 13 888, of whom 4307 are monozygotic (MZ) and 9581 ar dizygotic (DZ). These data were linked with the Hospital Discharge Register from 1972 to 1991 to identify twins who had dementia or related disease as a discharge diagnosis. The linkage of the registries yielded a total of 285 twin individuals. The medical records of these twins and their co-twins were reviewed to confirm and classify dementia (AD, vascular dementia, mixed dementia, and other dementia). The incidence, concordance, and age at onset of AD were examined.
The incidence of AD was significantly higher in MZ than in DZ twin individuals, with and adjusted MZ/DZ incidence ratio of 1.8 (95% confidence intervals 1.2 to 2.7). In contrast, the incidence of vascular or mixed dementia did not differ between MZ and DZ individuals (MZ/DZ ratio 0.6 [0.3 to 1.2]) for vascular and 1.0 [0.5 to 2.1] for mixed dementia). The pairwise concordance for AD was 18.6% in MZ pairs and 4.7% in DZ pairs and the corresponding probandwise concordance rates were 31.3% and 9.3%. The pairwise concordance for vascular dementia was 18.2% in MZ pairs and 6.7% in DZ pairs with corresponding probandwise rates of 30.8% and 12.5%. The onset age of AD concordant MZ pairs was identical in two pairs and diverged by up to 15 years.
The higher incidence of AD in MZ individuals than in DZ individuals may provide a clue to the aetiology of AD. The higher concordance rate of MZ pairs confirms the contribution of the major genetic component while indicating the need to identify environmental triggers.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1996 Apr 6;347(9006):975-68598792
Comment In: Lancet. 1996 Apr 6;347(9006):9768598793
PubMed ID
8596319 View in PubMed
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[Alzheimer's disease - the most common cause of dementia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306621
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 03 09; 117:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
03-09-2020
Author
Nenad Bogdanovic
Oskar Hansson
Henrik Zetterberg
Hans Basun
Martin Ingelsson
Lars Lannfelt
Kaj Blennow
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Tema Åldrande Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Tema Åldrande Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 03 09; 117:
Date
03-09-2020
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alzheimer Disease - complications - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides
Biomarkers
Dementia - etiology
Humans
Quality of Life
Sweden
tau Proteins
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. As many as 250,000 people in Sweden will have a dementia disease in 2050. The »amyloid cascade hypothesis« is a common model which explains how ß-amyloid affects the function of the nerve cells. Alzheimer's disease has a long-lasting course and can present in typical and atypical forms. CSF analyses for »core AD CSF biomarkers« and synaptic proteins have been available for clinical diagnostics. PET scanning can detect either ß-amyloid or tau aggregates in the brain of living humans. Current Alzheimer's disease therapy is based on two classes of cognition-enhancing drugs: acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and NMDA-receptor antagonist, which delays cognitive decline in most patients. The latest clinical development of potential therapy for Alzheimer's is active or passive immunotherapy against brain ß-amyloid and tau, where several studies have shown varying but promising treatment effects. Non-pharmacological interventions in patients with AD aim to delay the loss of mental abilities, helping people to be independent in everyday life for as long as possible, and to increase their well-being and quality of life.
PubMed ID
32154904 View in PubMed
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Association of Long-Term Dietary Fat Intake, Exercise, and Weight with Later Cognitive Function in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276114
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2016 Feb;20(2):146-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
J. Lehtisalo
J. Lindström
T. Ngandu
M. Kivipelto
S. Ahtiluoto
P. Ilanne-Parikka
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
J G Eriksson
M. Uusitupa
J. Tuomilehto
J. Luchsinger
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2016 Feb;20(2):146-54
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Dementia - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Glucose Intolerance - complications
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
To investigate associations of long-term nutrient intake, physical activity and obesity with later cognitive function among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which a lifestyle intervention was successful in diabetes prevention.
An active lifestyle intervention phase during middle age (mean duration 4 years) and extended follow-up (additional 9 years) with annual lifestyle measurements, followed by an ancillary cognition assessment.
5 research centers in Finland.
Of the 522 middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance recruited to the study, 364 (70%) participated in the cognition assessment (mean age 68 years).
A cognitive assessment was executed with the CERAD test battery and the Trail Making Test A on average 13 years after baseline. Lifestyle measurements included annual clinical measurements, food records, and exercise questionnaires during both the intervention and follow-up phase.
Lower intake of total fat (p=0.021) and saturated fatty acids (p=0.010), and frequent physical activity (p=0.040) during the whole study period were associated with better cognitive performance. Higher BMI (p=0.012) and waist circumference (p=0.012) were also associated with worse performance, but weight reduction prior to the cognition assessment predicted worse performance as well (decrease vs. increase, p=0.008 for BMI and p=0.002 for waist).
Long-term dietary fat intake, BMI, and waist circumference have an inverse association with cognitive function in later life among people with IGT. However, decreases in BMI and waist prior to cognitive assessment are associated with worse cognitive performance, which could be explained by reverse causality.
PubMed ID
26812510 View in PubMed
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Association of stroke with dementia, cognitive impairment, and functional disability in the very old: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54349
Source
Stroke. 1998 Oct;29(10):2094-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
L. Zhu
L. Fratiglioni
Z. Guo
H. Agüero-Torres
B. Winblad
M. Viitanen
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Li.Zhu@cnsf.ki.se
Source
Stroke. 1998 Oct;29(10):2094-9
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - etiology
Disabled Persons
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND and PURPOSE: Stroke is a major cause of disability in the elderly and is also related to the development of dementia, which is another important source of disability in old age. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential impact of stroke on cognitive and functional status in a community-based cohort of individuals aged 75 years and older. METHODS: The data were derived from a cross-sectional survey on aging and dementia that included all inhabitants of the Kungsholmen district in central Stockholm who were aged >/=75 years. Cases of stroke were identified through the computerized inpatient register system that has been widely used to study stroke in Sweden. Dementia was defined according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised. Dementia onset was considered the appearance, according to an informant, of the first symptom. Cognitive impairment without dementia was defined as the presence of a Mini-Mental State Examination score of
PubMed ID
9756588 View in PubMed
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Awareness and distress after traumatic brain injury: a relative's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173733
Source
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2005 Jul-Aug;20(4):359-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
George P Prigatano
Susan Borgaro
Jason Baker
Jennifer Wethe
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA. gprigat@chw.edu
Source
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2005 Jul-Aug;20(4):359-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Awareness
Brain Injuries - psychology
Dementia - etiology - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Memory Disorders - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Self-Assessment
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between relatives' distress level and their ratings of impaired awareness for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Participants were 25 patients with TBI, 16 with probably dementia, and 15 with memory complaints but no dementia. Participants completed the Barrow Neurological Institute Screen for Higher Cerebral Functions. Relatives of all patients completed the Patient Competency Rating Scale (Relative Form). Relatives also rated their distress level on a scale from 0 (no distress) to 10 (severe distress) and then rated the patient's level of awareness of their difficulties, also on a scale from 0 (not aware) to 10 (completely aware).
Clinical neuropsychology outpatient service of a neurological institute and medical center.
For relatives of patients with TBI, a significant correlation of -0.52 (P = .006) was found. Correlations for the dementia and memory complaint groups were -0.62 (P = .03) and -0.39 (P = .20), respectively.
The presence of brain dysfunction associated with neuropsychological disturbances appears to influence the magnitude of the relationship between the distress level of family members and their ratings of impaired awareness in persons with TBI.
PubMed ID
16030442 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and risk of dementia: results from the Rotterdam study and the Gothenburg H-70 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52423
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):33-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Ruitenberg
I. Skoog
A. Ott
O. Aevarsson
J C Witteman
B. Lernfelt
F. van Harskamp
A. Hofman
M M Breteler
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):33-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Comparative Study
Dementia - etiology - physiopathology
Diastole
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
The association between blood pressure and dementia is debated. Results from population-based studies on blood pressure and dementia are inconclusive, and most are performed in subjects younger than 80 years of age. We examined the relation between blood pressure and dementia and the possible effect modification of this relation by age in a pooled dataset based on two prospective population-based studies. Subjects came from the Rotterdam study (n = 6,668), a longitudinal population-based study among subjects aged 55 years and over, and from the Gothenburg H-70 Study (n = 317), a study on subjects aged 85 years at baseline. Screening and diagnostic procedures for assessment of dementia were similar at baseline and follow-up and comparable between studies. We estimated relative risks of dementia using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender and study location. The average follow-up was 2.1 years. During this period, 196 subjects developed dementia. The risk of dementia decreased with increasing blood pressure level (per 10 mm Hg systolic blood pressure: RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88-0.99; per 10 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure: RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-1.00). This association was confined to subjects who used anthypertensive medication. Persons who were demented at baseline had a stronger blood pressure decline during follow-up than those who were non-demented. This study suggests an inverse association between blood pressure and dementia risk in elderly persons on antihypertensive medication. Possibly, they may need higher blood pressure levels to maintain an adequate cerebral perfusion. Alternatively, lower blood pressure may be secondary to brain lesions in preclinical stages of dementia.
PubMed ID
11125239 View in PubMed
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Care and outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke with and without preexisting dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130021
Source
Neurology. 2011 Nov 1;77(18):1664-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2011
Author
G. Saposnik
R. Cote
P A Rochon
M. Mamdani
Y. Liu
S. Raptis
M K Kapral
S E Black
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto M5C 1R6, Canada. saposnikg@smh.ca
Source
Neurology. 2011 Nov 1;77(18):1664-73
Date
Nov-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dementia - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Care
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - complications - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Thrombolytic Therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To describe clinical characteristics and evaluate processes of care and outcomes at discharge in patients with ischemic stroke with and without preexisting dementia.
Retrospective cohort study using the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network including patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke between 2003 and 2008. Preexisting dementia was defined as any type of dementia that was present prior to the index stroke case. Palliative patients were excluded. Demographic information, clinical presentation, selected process measures (e.g., thrombolysis, admission to stroke unit, carotid imaging, stroke prevention), pneumonia, death, disability, and disposition at discharge were analyzed.
Among 9,304 eligible patients with an acute ischemic stroke, 702 (9.1%) had a history of dementia. Patients with dementia were older (mean age 81 vs 70 years; p
PubMed ID
22042795 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.