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ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272758
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0129115
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Henrik Ullum
Mads Melbye
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0129115
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - metabolism
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Dementia, Vascular - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail.
We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models.
Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98), compared to those with blood group O.
Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26042891 View in PubMed
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Acute and transient psychosis in old age and the subsequent risk of dementia: a nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89777
Source
Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2009 Mar;9(1):62-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Kørner Alex
Lopez Ana Garcia
Lauritzen Lise
Andersen Per Kragh
Kessing Lars Vedel
Author Affiliation
Unit of Psychogeriatric Research, Psychiatric Centre Nordsjaelland, Hilleroed, Denmark. alko@noh.regionh.dk
Source
Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2009 Mar;9(1):62-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
AIM: Using the unique Danish psychiatric and somatic health registers, we investigated the rate of subsequent dementia in patients with late-onset acute and transient psychosis. METHODS: By linkage of the psychiatric and the somatic nationwide registers of all patients with in- or outpatient hospital contact in Denmark, we included all patients with a first ever contact during the period 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2001 with one of the main index diagnoses: late-onset acute and transient psychosis or osteoarthritis. Data on the general population were also included. The first diagnosis of dementia for each individual at discharge or at outpatient contact was established. Poisson regression models were used to compare the cohorts of patients with dementia as the outcome of interest. RESULTS: Using a cut-off age of 60 years, 8062 individuals were included. Significant associations were found between a subsequent diagnosis of dementia and the index diagnosis, age and calendar time. Overall, the rate ratio for developing dementia in late-onset acute and transient psychosis compared to osteoarthritis patients was 10.86 (95% confidence intervals, 8.42 and 14.00, respectively), however, the magnitude of the rate ratio varied according to sex, age, duration since diagnosis and calendar time. Compared to the general population, the rate ratio was 8.12 (95% confidence intervals, 6.77 and 9.74, respectively). CONCLUSION: The present study has established that subjects with late-onset acute and transient psychosis are at 11 times higher risk of subsequently getting a diagnosis of dementia compared to patients with osteoarthritis, and at 8 times higher risk compared to the general population.
PubMed ID
19260981 View in PubMed
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[Aging and senile dementia - epidemiologic and etiologic aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242191
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Feb 23;80(8):665-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-1983
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Feb 23;80(8):665-72
Date
Feb-23-1983
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
6865585 View in PubMed
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An overview of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191052
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a multicenter, population-based cohort study of dementia with a sample of 10,263 participants aged 65 or over. Field work began in 1991, and a follow-up study was undertaken in 1996-97. The present article describes the origins and objectives of the study, provides an overview of its design, organization, and data collection methods, and offers a brief summary of the main results.
PubMed ID
11892976 View in PubMed
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APOE-epsilon4 predicts dementia but not other psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178704
Source
Neurology. 2004 Aug 24;63(4):749-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2004
Author
S. Koponen
T. Taiminen
V. Kairisto
R. Portin
H. Isoniemi
S. Hinkka
O. Tenovuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, PL 52, FIN-20521 Turku, Finland. salla.koponen@utu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2004 Aug 24;63(4):749-50
Date
Aug-24-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Amnesia - epidemiology - etiology
Apolipoprotein E4
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Brain Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors studied the association between APOE-epsilon4 genotype and axis I and II psychiatric disorders an average of 30 years after traumatic brain injury. Sixty patients were dichotomized into subjects with and without APOE-epsilon4 allele. Dementia and subclinical dementia were significantly more common with the presence of APOE-epsilon4. The occurrence of other psychiatric disorders did not differ between patients with and without APOE-epsilon4 allele.
PubMed ID
15326261 View in PubMed
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Association of Alcohol-Induced Loss of Consciousness and Overall Alcohol Consumption With Risk for Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304855
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 01; 3(9):e2016084
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2020
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Archana Singh-Manoux
G David Batty
Séverine Sabia
Andrew Sommerlad
Sarah Floud
Markus Jokela
Jussi Vahtera
May A Beydoun
Sakari B Suominen
Aki Koskinen
Ari Väänänen
Marcel Goldberg
Marie Zins
Lars Alfredsson
Peter J M Westerholm
Anders Knutsson
Solja T Nyberg
Pyry N Sipilä
Joni V Lindbohm
Jaana Pentti
Gill Livingston
Jane E Ferrie
Timo Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 01; 3(9):e2016084
Date
09-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - classification - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Ethanol - analysis - classification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unconsciousness - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
United Kingdom - epidemiology
Abstract
Evidence on alcohol consumption as a risk factor for dementia usually relates to overall consumption. The role of alcohol-induced loss of consciousness is uncertain.
To examine the risk of future dementia associated with overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced loss of consciousness in a population of current drinkers.
Seven cohort studies from the UK, France, Sweden, and Finland (IPD-Work consortium) including 131?415 participants were examined. At baseline (1986-2012), participants were aged 18 to 77 years, reported alcohol consumption, and were free of diagnosed dementia. Dementia was examined during a mean follow-up of 14.4 years (range, 12.3-30.1). Data analysis was conducted from November 17, 2019, to May 23, 2020.
Self-reported overall consumption and loss of consciousness due to alcohol consumption were assessed at baseline. Two thresholds were used to define heavy overall consumption: greater than 14 units (U) (UK definition) and greater than 21 U (US definition) per week.
Dementia and alcohol-related disorders to 2016 were ascertained from linked electronic health records.
Of the 131?415 participants (mean [SD] age, 43.0 [10.4] years; 80?344 [61.1%] women), 1081 individuals (0.8%) developed dementia. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.16 (95% CI, 0.98-1.37) for consuming greater than 14 vs 1 to 14 U of alcohol per week and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.48) for greater than 21 vs 1 to 21 U/wk. Of the 96?591 participants with data on loss of consciousness, 10?004 individuals (10.4%) reported having lost consciousness due to alcohol consumption in the past 12 months. The association between loss of consciousness and dementia was observed in men (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.77-4.63) and women (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.34-3.25) during the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.78-4.15), after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.16-2.99), and for early-onset (
PubMed ID
32902651 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Jul;57(7):1316; author reply 1316-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
William R Hazzard
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Jul;57(7):1316; author reply 1316-7
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Risk factors
Thinness
Notes
Comment On: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2349-5019093935
Comment On: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2261-619093925
PubMed ID
19570170 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular and cognitive fitness at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104811
Source
Brain. 2014 May;137(Pt 5):1514-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Jenny Nyberg
Maria A I Åberg
Linus Schiöler
Michael Nilsson
Anders Wallin
Kjell Torén
H Georg Kuhn
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Brain. 2014 May;137(Pt 5):1514-23
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Progression
Humans
Male
Mild Cognitive Impairment - epidemiology - etiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Patients with early-onset dementia are a significantly under-recognized subgroup of patients with an increasing prevalence. Epidemiological studies are limited and studies of modifiable risk factors, such as physical fitness, are lacking. We aimed to investigate the associations between cardiovascular fitness individually and in combination with cognitive performance at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life. We performed a population-based cohort study of over 1.1 million Swedish, 18-year-old, male conscripts, who underwent conscription exams between 1968 and 2005. These males were then followed for up to 42 years. Objective data on cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance were collected during conscription exams and were subsequently linked with hospital registries to calculate later risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment using Cox proportional hazards models controlling for several confounders. The scores from the exams were divided into tertiles (low, medium, high) for the analyses. The mean follow-up time for the analyses was 25.7 years (standard deviation: 9.3) and the median was 27 years. In total, 30 195 315 person-years of follow-up were included in the study. In fully adjusted models, both low cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance (compared to high) at age 18 were associated with increased risk for future early-onset dementia (cardiovascular fitness, n = 662 events: hazard ratio 2.49, 95%, confidence interval 1.87-3.32; cognitive performance, n = 657 events: hazard ratio 4.11, 95%, confidence interval 3.19-5.29) and mild cognitive impairment (cardiovascular fitness, n = 213 events: hazard ratio 3.57, 95%, confidence interval 2.23-5.74; cognitive performance, n = 212 events: hazard ratio 3.23, 95%, confidence interval 2.12-4.95). Poor performance on both cardiovascular fitness and cognitive tests was associated with a >7-fold (hazard ratio 7.34, 95%, confidence interval 5.08-10.58) and a >8-fold (hazard ratio 8.44, 95%, confidence interval 4.64-15.37) increased risk of early-onset dementia and early-onset mild cognitive impairment, respectively. In conclusion, lower cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance in early adulthood were associated with an increased risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life, and the greatest risks were observed for individuals with a combination of low cardiovascular fitness and low cognitive performance.
Notes
Comment In: Brain. 2014 May;137(Pt 5):1280-124771400
PubMed ID
24604561 View in PubMed
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Clinical problems in non-fluctuating patients with Parkinson's disease: a community-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46159
Source
Mov Disord. 2000 Sep;15(5):826-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
J P Larsen
K. Karlsen
E. Tandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Mov Disord. 2000 Sep;15(5):826-9
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Drug Tolerance
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Levodopa - adverse effects
Male
Movement Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Neurologic Examination
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatients
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychomotor Performance
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of nonfluctuators in a community-based prevalence study of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to describe disability, non-motor problems, and health-related quality of life in patients with PD with and without motor fluctuations, and compare the findings to those of two control groups. METHODS: The study involved 245 patients with PD who were participating in a prevalence study and two control groups (100 healthy elderly individuals and 100 patients with diabetes mellitus [DM]). Data were obtained through neurologic examination and a semistructured interview, and by the use of several questionnaires. RESULTS: In this group of unselected patients with PD, 78% did not experience motor fluctuations. Mean duration of treatment with levodopa was 6.3 years. Patients with motor fluctuations had a lower age at onset of disease, longer duration of disease, and a higher daily levodopa dose than patients without fluctuations. Among the non-fluctuating patients, we found more dementia and a higher age at prevalence day. Disability (assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale subscales for activities of daily living and motor function and the Hoehn and Yahr stage) was similar in fluctuators and nonfluctuators. Depression, sleep disturbances, and fatigue were equally frequent in both patient groups. The occurrence of these difficulties was clearly more frequent among non-fluctuating patients with PD than among the control subjects. CONCLUSION: Most patients in the general population who have PD do not experience dose-dependent motor fluctuations. Severity of motor disability and neuropsychiatric manifestations are as important in non-fluctuators as in fluctuators. Patients without motor fluctuations have more depression, sleep disturbances, fatigue, and a poorer health-related quality of life than patients with DM and healthy elderly individuals. This also underlines the importance of developing better management and treatment strategies for this group of patients with PD.
PubMed ID
11009186 View in PubMed
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Coffee drinking in middle age is not associated with cognitive performance in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149800
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep;90(3):640-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Venla S Laitala
Jaakko Kaprio
Markku Koskenvuo
Ismo Räihä
Juha O Rinne
Karri Silventoinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. venla.laitala@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep;90(3):640-6
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coffee
Cognition - drug effects
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - prevention & control
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Plant Extracts - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Abstract
The lack of effective disease-modifying treatments highlights the need for research on the prevention of dementia. It has been suggested that coffee has a protective effect on cognitive performance in old age, but only some of the previous studies have shown this association.
The aim of our study was to analyze the potential association between coffee drinking in middle age and cognitive performance in old age in a large sample of Finnish twins.
Coffee consumption and other baseline variables of 2606 middle-aged Finnish twins were assessed in 1975 and 1981 by postal questionnaires. After the median follow-up of 28 y, their cognitive status was measured by using a validated telephone interview questionnaire.
Coffee consumption was high and associated with educational level and several other baseline variables. After adjustment for these variables, linear regression analysis showed that coffee consumption was not an independent predictor of cognitive performance in old age (beta = -0.12 test score units per coffee cup; 95% CI: -0.27, 0.04). No consistent differences in coffee consumption and cognitive score were observed within discordant twin pairs. Also, coffee drinking did not affect the risk of mild cognitive impairment or dementia.
Coffee drinking is associated with many sociodemographic and health variables, but our results do not support an independent role of coffee in the pathogenesis of cognitive decline and dementia.
PubMed ID
19587088 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.