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[A consensus on dementia (II): A survey and special diagnosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227804
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 19;87(51-52):4443-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-19-1990
Author
A. Wallin
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för psykiatri och neurokemi, S:t Jörgens sjukhus, Hisings Backa.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 19;87(51-52):4443-8
Date
Dec-19-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Methods
Middle Aged
Sweden
PubMed ID
2273931 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dementia diagnosis differs in men and women and depends on age and dementia severity: data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Quality Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125991
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dorota Religa
Kalle Spångberg
Anders Wimo
Ann-Katrin Edlund
Bengt Winblad
Maria Eriksdotter-Jönhagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. dorota.religa@ki.se
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2012;33(2-3):90-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism - psychology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - metabolism
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology
Electroencephalography - methods
Executive Function
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examine the dementia assessment with focus on age and gender differences.
Data from the national quality database, Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem), including 6,937 dementia patients diagnosed during 2007-2009 at memory clinics were used. We have studied the use of investigations for dementia diagnostics such as cognitive tests, blood and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electroencephalography, radiological examinations and assessments of functions. Severity of cognitive impairment was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE).
There was a significant decrease in the number of total tests used in the elderly group (>75 years) when compared with the middle-aged group (65-75 years) and younger patients (
PubMed ID
22433665 View in PubMed
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Incidence of stroke in relation to cognitive function and dementia in the Kungsholmen Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47863
Source
Neurology. 2000 Jun 13;54(11):2103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-13-2000
Author
L. Zhu
L. Fratiglioni
Z. Guo
B. Winblad
M. Viitanen
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Geriatric Medicine, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Li.Zhu@cnsf.ki.se
Source
Neurology. 2000 Jun 13;54(11):2103-7
Date
Jun-13-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebrovascular Accident - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether cognitive function is related to incidence of stroke. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 1551 subjects with no clinical history or signs of stroke, age 75 years and over at baseline, were followed up for 3 years. Individuals with a first-ever stroke event that was recorded in the Stockholm inpatient register after the date of baseline interview were considered as incident stroke patients. Diagnosis of stroke followed the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision (ICD-9). Diagnosis of dementia was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd ed., revised (DSM-III-R). Cognitive functioning was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination. RESULTS: During the 4102 person-years of follow-up, 110 events were recorded, giving an overall incidence of stroke of 26.8 per 1000 person-years. Subjects with mild dementia had a relative risk of 2.6 (95% CI, 1.2 to 5.7) of developing stroke after controlling for the potential confounders. The corresponding figure for subjects with cognitive impairment was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8; p = 0.05). There was a tendency for subjects who developed stroke to be more likely to have vascular factors (systolic blood pressure >180 mm Hg, heart disease, or diabetes mellitus) than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Mild dementia and cognitive impairment are associated with an increased incidence of stroke among subjects age 75 years old and over. Because stroke increases risk of dementia and prior stroke increases risk of a subsequent stroke, mild dementia and cognitive impairment may be a manifestation of clinically unrecognized stroke.
PubMed ID
10851370 View in PubMed
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Left ventricular hypertrophy and blood pressure as predictors of cognitive decline in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179676
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr;16(2):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Mervi Kähönen-Väre
Suvi Brunni-Hakala
Magnus Lindroos
Kaisu Pitkala
Timo Strandberg
Reijo Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2004 Apr;16(2):147-52
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Echocardiography
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Electrocardiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Heart - anatomy & histology
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - etiology - pathology
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Organ Size
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The relationships between blood pressure (BP) and cognition are complex and are still partly unclear. The impact of history of hypertension, present BP levels, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on cognition was investigated in a 10-year follow-up study of an aged population.
The population-based sample consisted of 75-, 80- and 85-year-old individuals at baseline (N=650). Their history of hypertension was investigated, and present BP values were recorded several times. Echocardiographic examinations were performed twice at 3-year intervals, and electrocardiography (ECG) at entry. Cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at baseline and at 10 years, and by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) at baseline, at 1, 5 and 10 years.
At baseline, elderly individuals with impaired cognition or dementia had lower BP, but thicker left ventricle posterior wall (LVPW), greater cardiac mass, and more often signs of LVH in ECG than those without cognitive deficits. Echocardiographic LVH, but not BP, predicted cognitive decline in a 5-year follow-up. Patients who died demented within 5 years were characterized by low BP and thin LVPW. Baseline BP and echocardiographic variables were not significantly different between those who had and had not cognitive decline at 10 years, but declining BP tended to precede cognitive deficits.
Results indicate that, the closer cognitive decline, the lower the BP, and suggest that, although LVH is a risk factor of cognitive decline, it loses its predictive value in old age.
PubMed ID
15195990 View in PubMed
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Midlife overweight and obesity increase late-life dementia risk: a population-based twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134849
Source
Neurology. 2011 May 3;76(18):1568-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-3-2011
Author
W L Xu
A R Atti
M. Gatz
N L Pedersen
B. Johansson
L. Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Gävlegatan 16, S-113 30 Stockholm, Sweden. weili.xu@ki.se
Source
Neurology. 2011 May 3;76(18):1568-74
Date
May-3-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Diseases in Twins
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Obesity - complications
Odds Ratio
Overweight - complications
Registries
Risk
Sweden
Twins
Abstract
The relation of overweight to dementia is controversial. We aimed to examine the association of midlife overweight and obesity with dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) in late life, and to verify the hypothesis that genetic and early-life environmental factors contribute to the observed association.
From the Swedish Twin Registry, 8,534 twin individuals aged =65 (mean age 74.4) were assessed to detect dementia cases (DSM-IV criteria). Height and weight at midlife (mean age 43.4) were available in the Registry. Data were analyzed as follows: 1) unmatched case-control analysis for all twins using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models and 2) cotwin matched case-control approach for dementia-discordant twin pairs by conditional logistic regression taking into account lifespan vascular disorders and diabetes.
Among all participants, dementia was diagnosed in 350 subjects, and 114 persons had questionable dementia. Overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25-30) and obesity (BMI >30) at midlife were present in 2,541 (29.8%) individuals. In fully adjusted GEE models, compared with normal BMI (20-25), overweight and obesity at midlife were related to dementia with odds ratios (ORs) (95% CIs) of 1.71 (1.30-2.25) and 3.88 (2.12-7.11), respectively. Conditional logistic regression analysis in 137 dementia-discordant twin pairs led to an attenuated midlife BMI-dementia association. The difference in ORs from the GEE and the matched case-control analysis was statistically significant (p = 0.019).
Both overweight and obesity at midlife independently increase the risk of dementia, AD, and VaD. Genetic and early-life environmental factors may contribute to the midlife high adiposity-dementia association.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21536637 View in PubMed
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Neuropsychiatric impairments as predictors of mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157419
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Aug-Sep;23(4):326-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Janet Stepaniuk
Lesley J Ritchie
Holly Tuokko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Aug-Sep;23(4):326-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Affect - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Canada
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Depression - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
In this study, the relations between cognitive status and neuropsychiatric impairments in nondemented older adults in cross section and over time is examined. Using data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA), a longitudinal, nation-wide study in which data were collected 3 times (ie, CSHA-1, CSHA-2, CSHA-3) at 5-year intervals, individuals were classified with (n = 240) and without (n = 386) cognitive impairment at CSHA-2. Loss of interest, changes in personality and mood, and depression were reported by a knowledgeable informant (ie, family or friends) more frequently for those with cognitive impairment than for those without cognitive impairment. After controlling for initial cognitive status, loss of interest and depression contributed significantly to the prediction of mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease over time. These findings suggest that these neuropsychiatric impairments play significant roles throughout the course of cognitive decline and should be taken into consideration even before cognitive impairment is evident.
PubMed ID
18453641 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prognosis of mild cognitive impairment in early Parkinson disease: the Norwegian ParkWest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115226
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2013 May;70(5):580-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Kenn Freddy Pedersen
Jan Petter Larsen
Ole-Bjorn Tysnes
Guido Alves
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. kenfrp@online.no
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2013 May;70(5):580-6
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - diagnosis - etiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is common in Parkinson disease (PD), but the prognostic value of MCI in early PD is unknown.
To examine the course of MCI and its progression to dementia in an incident PD cohort.
Prospective longitudinal cohort study.
The Norwegian ParkWest study, an ongoing population-based study of the incidence, neurobiology, and prognosis of PD in western and southern Norway.
A population-based cohort of 182 patients with incident PD monitored for 3 years.
Serial neuropsychological tests of attention, executive function, verbal memory, and visuospatial skills were administered at baseline, 1 year, and 3 years. Patients were classified as having MCI and received a diagnosis of dementia according to published consensus criteria.
Significantly more patients with MCI than without MCI at baseline (10 of 37 [27.0%] vs 1 of 145 [0.7%]; relative risk, 39.2 [95% CI, 5.2-296.5]; P
Notes
Comment In: JAMA Neurol. 2013 May;70(5):553-523529474
PubMed ID
23529397 View in PubMed
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[Treatment of delirium in a psychogeriatric university hospital department. Etiology, treatment concept and outcome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46269
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 5;161(14):2090-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-1999
Author
J K Djernes
N C Gulmann
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, gerontopsykiatrisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 5;161(14):2090-4
Date
Apr-5-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cognition Disorders - drug therapy - therapy
Delirium - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Denmark
Depression - diagnosis - therapy
English Abstract
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing
Geriatric Psychiatry
Humans
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purposes of the study were to account for aetiology, treatment concept, outcome of treatment, and discharge destination of delirious elderly inpatients. During one year all patients in a psychogeriatric university department were assessed on admission and at discharge with a selection of assessments measuring psychopathology, behavioural disorders, depressive symptoms, intellectual functioning, activities of daily living, and gait. Diagnoses were made according to the ICD-10 criteria for research. All patients with a principal diagnosis of delirium (n = 26) are accounted for. Delirious patients improved their health status significantly in all the assessments, and 86% of patients admitted from independent living were discharged to independent living. It is concluded that elderly inpatients with severe or prolonged delirium profit significantly from the treatment concept in all of the rated health aspects.
PubMed ID
10354796 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.