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Alexithymia in a normal elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212557
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1996 Mar-Apr;37(2):144-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Joukamaa
S. Saarijärvi
M L Muuriaisniemi
R K Salokangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1996 Mar-Apr;37(2):144-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Aged
Aging - psychology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Reference Values
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alexithymia in an elderly Finnish population sample. Associations between alexithymia and sociodemographic factors were investigated, together with the relationship between alexithymia and perceived somatic health and self-reported psychic health. The study forms a part of the Turun Vanhustutkimus (TUR-VA) project, which is a longitudinal, prospective follow-up study dealing with psychosocial adaptation to retirement and to old age. The study group consisted of a population sample of 72-year-old people (N = 190). Alexithymia was measured with the 26-item version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26). The prevalence of alexithymia was 34%. Alexithymia was associated with poor perceived somatic health. Alexithymia was associated with having a psychiatric disturbance (measured by the 36-item General Health Questionnaire [GHQ-36]), but this relationship disappeared when the influence of perceived somatic health was controlled for. Alexithymia was not associated with gender, marital status, social status, or residential area.
PubMed ID
8654065 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H C Hendrie
K S Hall
N. Pillay
D. Rodgers
C. Prince
J. Norton
H. Brittain
A. Nath
A. Blue
J. Kaufert
Author Affiliation
Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis 46202-5110.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1993;5(1):5-14
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Abstract
A community survey and subsequent clinical assessment of 192 Cree aged 65 years and over registered in two Reserves in Northern Manitoba identified only one case of probable Alzheimer's disease among eight cases of dementia, giving a prevalence of 0.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias. This contrasted with an age-adjusted prevalence of 3.5% for Alzheimer's disease and 4.2% for all dementias in an age-stratified sample of 241 English-speaking residents of Winnipeg. Although it was not so for all dementias, the difference between the groups for prevalence of Alzheimer's disease was highly significant (p
PubMed ID
8499574 View in PubMed
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The association of depression with subsequent dementia diagnosis: A Swedish nationwide cohort study from 1964 to 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307381
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 01; 17(1):e1003016
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
01-2020
Author
Sofie Holmquist
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 01; 17(1):e1003016
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Depression is associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, short follow-up times and lack of adjustment for familial factors in previous studies could influence this association. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between depression and subsequent dementia, while controlling for familial factors and with a follow-up of over 35 years.
Two cohorts were formed from all individuals aged 50 years or older living in Sweden as of 31 December 2005 (n = 3,341,010). The Swedish National Patient Register was searched from 1964 through 2016 to identify diagnosis of depression and dementia. In the first cohort, individuals diagnosed with depression (n = 119,386) were matched 1:1 with controls without depression diagnosis. The second cohort was a sibling cohort (n = 50,644) consisting of same-sex full sibling pairs with discordant depression status. In the population matched cohort study, a total of 9,802 individuals were diagnosed with dementia during a mean follow-up time of 10.41 (range 0-35) years (5.5% of those diagnosed with depression and 2.6% of those without depression diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.47, 95% CI 2.35-2.58; p
PubMed ID
31917808 View in PubMed
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Associations between birth characteristics and age-related cognitive impairment and dementia: A registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299338
Source
PLoS Med. 2018 07; 15(7):e1002609
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
07-2018
Author
Miriam A Mosing
Cecilia Lundholm
Sven Cnattingius
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS Med. 2018 07; 15(7):e1002609
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Cephalometry
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognitive Aging
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Head - anatomy & histology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is evidence for long-lasting effects of birth characteristics on cognitive ability in childhood and adulthood. Further, low cognitive ability throughout the lifetime has been linked to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk. However, little is known about the effects of birth characteristics on cognitive dysfunction late in life. Here we explore potential associations between birth characteristics (weight, head circumference, length, and gestational age), adjusted and not adjusted for gestational age, and cognitive impairment and dementia late in life.
Data from twins in the Swedish Twin Registry born 1926-1960 were merged with information from the Swedish birth, patient, and cause of death registries, resulting in a sample of 35,191 individuals. A subsample of 4,000 twins aged 65 years and older also participated in a telephone cognitive screening in 1998-2002. Associations of birth characteristics with registry-based dementia diagnoses and on telephone-assessed cognitive impairment were investigated in the full sample and subsample, respectively. The full sample contained 907 (2.6%) individuals with a dementia diagnosis (an incidence rate of 5.9% per 100,000 person-years), 803 (2.4%) individuals born small for gestational age, and 929 (2.8%) individuals born with a small head for gestational age. The subsample contained 569 (14.2%) individuals with cognitive impairment. Low birth weight for gestational age and being born with a small head for gestational age were significant risk factors for cognitive dysfunction late in life, with an up to 2-fold risk increase (p
PubMed ID
30020924 View in PubMed
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Behavioral symptoms and the administration of psychotropic drugs to aged patients with dementia in nursing homes and in acute geriatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179741
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2004 Mar;16(1):61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
K H Pitkala
J V Laurila
T E Strandberg
R S Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Geriatric Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@hus.fi
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2004 Mar;16(1):61-74
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Electroencephalography
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services for the Aged
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Nursing Homes
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
To describe the prevalence of various psychiatric and behavioral symptoms among patients with dementia in nursing homes and acute geriatric wards and to investigate the administration of psychotropic medications to these patients.
425 consecutive patients (>70 years) in six acute geriatric wards in two city hospitals and seven nursing homes in Helsinki, Finland, were assessed with an extensive interview, cognitive tests, and attention tests. Of these, 255 were judged to have dementia according to the following information: previous dementia diagnoses and their adequacy, results of CT scans, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) tests, Clinical Dementia Scale (CDR) tests, and DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric and behavioral symptoms were recorded over two weeks for each patient.
Psychiatric and behavioral symptoms were very common among patients with dementia in both settings. In all, 48% presented with psychotic symptoms (delusions, visual or auditory hallucinations, misidentifications or paranoid symptoms), 43% with depression, 26% agitation, and 26% apathy. Use of psychotropic drugs was also common: 87% were on at least one psychotropic drug, 66% took at least two, 36% at least three, and 11% four or more psychotropic drugs. Of the patients with dementia, 42% were on conventional antipsychotics, and 34% on anxiolytics despite their known side-effects. Only 13% were on atypical antipsychotics and 3% on cholinesterase inhibitors. The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was common (31%) among the patients. A surprising finding was that drugs with anticholinergic effects were also frequently (20%) used.
Both behavioural symptoms and use of psychotropic drugs are very common among dementia patients in institutional settings. The frequent use of potentially harmful drugs implies a need for education among physicians taking care of these patients.
PubMed ID
15190997 View in PubMed
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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cognitive impairment in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213381
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1996;8(1):113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
R. Isoaho
H. Puolijoki
E. Huhti
P. Laippala
S L Kivelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, Unit of General Practice/Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1996;8(1):113-25
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In a cross-sectional epidemiological study in Lieto, Finland, 61 men and 21 women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were compared with age- and sex-matched controls from the same community to analyze the associations between COPD, cognitive performance, and occurrence of dementia. The cognitive assessment was based on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), previous clinical documents, and the assessment made by the research nurse after she had interviewed and tested each subject. These three measures revealed no differences between the COPD patients and the age-matched controls, and MMSE subtest scores did not differ significantly between the patients and controls. The findings suggest that the relative contribution of COPD to the occurrence of cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly may be none or minimal at the community level.
PubMed ID
8805092 View in PubMed
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Correction for age, education and other demographic variables in the use of the Mini Mental State Examination in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223614
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
R. Ylikoski
T. Erkinjuntti
R. Sulkava
K. Juva
R. Tilvis
J. Valvanne
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1992 Jun;85(6):391-6
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Abstract
The population-based Helsinki Aging Study was comprised of three age groups: 75-, 80- and 85-year-olds. A random sample of 511 subjects completed the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and were assessed on the Clinical Dementia Rating-scale (CDR). According to the CDR results 446 subjects were screened as non-demented. Of these subjects 30% scored below or at 24 MMSE points. Age, education and social group had a significant effect on the MMSE scores, even after excluding the demented cases. Together they explained 10% of the total variance within the MMSE. Social group correlated with education. The MMSE scores were corrected according to age and education. Adjustment of the originally used cutpoint of 24 resulted in cutpoints of 25 and 26 among the 75-year-olds, in the low and high education groups respectively; 23 and 26 in the 80-year-olds; 22 and 23 in the 85-year-olds.
PubMed ID
1642109 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-cultural comparison of depression and depressive symptoms in older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46577
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Jun;87(6):369-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
M E Dewey
C. de la Cámara
J R Copeland
A. Lobo
P. Saz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Jun;87(6):369-73
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article presents data on the prevalence of depression and the profile of depressive symptoms in 2 groups of people aged 65 and over: 1070 living in Liverpool, United Kingdom, and 1080 living in Zaragoza, Spain. Similar prevalence figures were found for women (Liverpool first); 14.2% vs 14.8% and, for men, 7.2% vs 6.2%. No age differences were found. The figures are lower than those found using similar methods in London and New York, but higher than those from Iceland. The article also compares the profile of depressive symptoms between Liverpool and Zaragoza and explains these by reference to social and cultural differences.
PubMed ID
8356886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dementia and cognitive impairment in the oldest old: a comparison of two rating methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227294
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1991;3(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
B. Johansson
S H Zarit
Author Affiliation
Institute for Gerontology, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1991;3(1):29-38
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Institutionalization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Rates of cognitive impairment in a representative population of the oldest old (aged 84 to 90) were examined using two indicators: The Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), and a Cognitive Rating (CR) derived from performance on five neuropsychological tests. Prevalence was estimated at 25.3%, using the GDS, and 30% with the CR. The overall degree of congruence between the measures was high, with most disagreements involving mildly impaired cases. The results indicate a high degree of convergence of clinical and neuropsychological indicators. The findings also confirm high rates of impairment among the oldest old.
PubMed ID
1863704 View in PubMed
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Dementia syndromes in nursing home patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224849
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1992;4(2):241-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Andersson
C G Gottfries
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics and Rehabilitation, Kungälv Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1992;4(2):241-52
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Homes for the Aged - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nursing Homes - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Patients (n = 191) living in four comparable somatic nursing homes (NH) (nursing homes for physical illness) were studied in order to evaluate dementia syndromes. Dementia and symptoms of depressed mood occurred frequently (72% and 63%, respectively). Dementia was often undiagnosed at admittance. Neither the length of time spent in institutions, nor marital status, age, or sex seemed to be of more than minor importance to the prevalence of dementia syndromes. Concerning functional impairment, convergence of findings across the societies studied indicates that psychiatric symptoms and psychopathology are intrinsic parts of long-term care of the elderly.
PubMed ID
1477312 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.