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384 records – page 1 of 39.

100 years after Alzheimer: contemporary neurology practice assessment of referrals for dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153508
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tiffany W Chow
Carin Binder
Steven Smyth
Sharon Cohen
Alain Robillard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Neurology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The prevalence of dementia is placing an increased burden on specialists.
Canadian neurologists responded to a structured questionnaire to assess reasons for referral and services provided as well as to compare the neurologists' perceptions of their practice characteristics against cases seen over a 3-month period.
The audit confirmed the participants' perception that family practitioners are the main referral source (358/453, 79%). Sixty-two percent of patients had undergone clinical investigation for dementia prior to being seen by the neurologist; 39% (177/453) were on pharmacotherapy at the time of referral, 68% were initiated on pharmacotherapy by the neurologist. A fifth of the referrals did not meet clinical criteria for dementia, which may be directly related to the prevalence of prior workup that did not include mental status testing.
Neurologists currently treat patients referred for dementia who may already have been adequately evaluated and treated by primary care providers.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):513-519222144
PubMed ID
19106275 View in PubMed
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[A care program for dementia. Increased cooperation between health care and social service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1995
Author
L. Gustafson
A K Thulin
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Date
Jun-21-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Patient Care Planning
Social Support
Social Work
Sweden
PubMed ID
7637427 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148112
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pontus Höglund
Sten Levander
Henrik Anckarsäter
Susanna Radovic
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Science, Malmo, Lund University, Sweden. pontus.hoglund@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Character
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Insanity Defense
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.
PubMed ID
19811835 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of short clinical rating scales in neuropathologically diagnosed dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144936
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;18(9):810-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Lars Gustafson
Elisabet Englund
Hans Brunnström
Arne Brun
Catarina Erikson
Siegbert Warkentin
Ulla Passant
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden. Lars.Gustafson@med.lu.se
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;18(9):810-20
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Brain - blood supply - pathology
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - standards - statistics & numerical data
Dementia, Vascular - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Frontotemporal Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The overall aim was to evaluate to what extent the diagnosis of dementia subtypes, obtained by three clinical rating scales, concurred with postmortem neuropathologic (NP) diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular dementia (VaD) and mixed AD/VaD.
A prospective longitudinal clinical work-up with postmortem NP examination.
Two hundred nine patients with dementia referred for clinical evaluation and follow-up.
The diagnostic scores in a set of three short clinical rating scales for AD, FTD, and VaD were evaluated against NP diagnoses.
The sensitivity and specificity of the AD scale were 0.80 and 0.87, respectively, of the FTD scale 0.93 and 0.92, respectively, and of the Hachinski Ischemic Score (HIS, VaD diagnosis) 0.69 and 0.92, respectively. Cases with mixed AD/VaD generally presented a combination of high AD and ischemic scores. A preferred cutoff score of six was identified for both the AD and FTD scales.
All three clinical rating scales showed a high sensitivity and specificity, in close agreement with final NP diagnosis-for the HIS a moderate sensitivity. These scales may thus be considered good diagnostic tools and are recommended for clinical and research center settings.
PubMed ID
20220603 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Mini-Mental Status Examination as a screening test for dementia in a Swedish elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221309
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1993 Apr;87(4):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
M. Grut
L. Fratiglioni
M. Viitanen
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1993 Apr;87(4):312-7
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) as a screening test for dementia in an elderly Swedish population. All the inhabitants over 74 years of age in one area of Stockholm took the MMSE. The test was then compared to the clinical diagnosis of dementia. With a cut-off point of 23/24, the MMSE had a sensitivity of 87%, specificity of 92%, and positive predictive value (PPV) of 69%. Age, sex, and education did not substantially affect the specificity and the PPV, but had a slight effect on the sensitivity. The main causes of the false positives were somatic and psychiatric disorders. These results are in agreement with studies performed with similar methods and comparable populations.
PubMed ID
8503262 View in PubMed
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[A consensus on dementia (II): A survey and special diagnosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227804
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 19;87(51-52):4443-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-19-1990
Author
A. Wallin
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för psykiatri och neurokemi, S:t Jörgens sjukhus, Hisings Backa.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 19;87(51-52):4443-8
Date
Dec-19-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dementia - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Methods
Middle Aged
Sweden
PubMed ID
2273931 View in PubMed
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[Admission of patients with dementia to a psychiatric hospital. Social circumstances, circumstances of admission, treatment and further referral].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103280
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 22;152(4):232-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-1990
Author
O. Jørgensen
P. Petersen
P. Glue
Author Affiliation
Middelfart Sygehus, Psykiatrisk Afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 22;152(4):232-5
Date
Jan-22-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Dementia - diagnosis - drug therapy - nursing
Denmark
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This investigation is a retrospective registration on the basis of the case histories of 290 patients with the main diagnosis dementia who were admitted to a psychiatric hospital in the years 1982 and 1983. The average age was 77 years. Patients with their own homes comprized 61% but only 28% were admitted from their own homes. More than 70% of the patients admitted were described as suffering from moderate or severe dementia on admission. 93% were admitted voluntarily and 91% during the daytime. The reason for admission most frequently registered was the patient's suffering. In 66% of the cases, the general practitioner had attempted treatment prior to admission. During hospitalization the majority of the patients received medicinal treatment. At the conclusion of treatment, 52% were found to be improved and 34% unchanged. 46% of the patients were assessed as requiring maximum nursing-home treatment and 29% were considered to need psychiatric nursing-home treatment. 8% could be discharged to their own homes. The average durations of hospitalization, duration of treatment and waiting-time were reviewed. It is noteworthy that the waiting-time, 311 days, was found to be nearly as long as the duration of treatment, 316 days. In addition, the waiting-times for nursing-homes with maximum care were calculated to be 229 days on an average and for psychiatric nursing homes 596 days.
PubMed ID
2301066 View in PubMed
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Age-related incidence and family history in frontotemporal dementia: data from the Swedish Dementia Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263621
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94901
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christer Nilsson
Maria Landqvist Waldö
Karin Nilsson
Alexander Santillo
Susanna Vestberg
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94901
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Frontotemporal Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is considered to be a mainly early-onset neurodegenerative disorder with a strong hereditary component. The aim of the study was to investigate age-related incidence and family history in FTD compared to other dementia disorders, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD).
The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) registers all new cases of dementia diagnosed by the participating centres, including data on demographics, diagnosis, and investigations used. Data for the period 2008-2011 were extracted and compared with age-related population data on a regional and national level.
There were 20 305 patients registered in SveDem during 2008-2011, whereof 352 received a diagnosis of FTD. Mean age at diagnosis for FTD was 69.6 years and almost 70% of FTD cases were 65 years or older at the time of diagnosis. Both FTD and AD showed an increased incidence with age, which reached a maximum in the age group 80-84 years at 6.04 and 202 cases per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The proportion of cases with a positive family history was significantly lower in FTD than in AD.
Contrary to general opinion within the field, data from SveDem show that the incidence of FTD increases with age, and that the majority of cases are diagnosed after the age of 65 years. In addition, data from SveDem might suggest that the importance of hereditary factors in general is similar in FTD and AD. The recognition of these findings has important consequences for the diagnosis, treatment and care of patients with FTD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24722237 View in PubMed
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384 records – page 1 of 39.