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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Access to breast cancer screening programs for women with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128355
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2012 Nov;23(4):1609-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Renée Proulx
Céline Mercier
Fanny Lemétayer
Sylvie Jutras
Diane Major
Author Affiliation
CRDITED de Montréal, 75, rue de Port-Royal Est, bureau 110, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3L 3T1. renee.proulx@crditedmtl.ca
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2012 Nov;23(4):1609-19
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Delphi Technique
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Quebec
Abstract
The goal of this study was to identify measures to facilitate access to the Quebec Breast Cancer Screening Program for women with activity limitations, considering the barriers to screening uptake in that population.
The study was carried out in three stages. First, 124 semi-structured interviews were conducted in five regions of Quebec with five groups of key informants. The content analysis lead to the identification of 64 proposals, which were submitted to 31 experts through a two-round Delphi survey process. Finally, consultations were held with 11 resource people to determine which decision-making levels (local, regional, provincial) could play a key role in implementing the proposals.
A strong consensus (=80%) was achieved for 25 proposals seen as highly relevant and feasible.
The implementation of such proposals could substantially improve access to screening, given the prevalence of activity limitations in the age group targeted by the program.
PubMed ID
23698675 View in PubMed
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Access to health care among status Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154422
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
Song Gao
Braden J Manns
Bruce F Culleton
Marcello Tonelli
Hude Quan
Lynden Crowshoe
William A Ghali
Lawrence W Svenson
Sofia Ahmed
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Creatinine - blood
Delphi Technique
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Ethnic disparities in access to health care and health outcomes are well documented. It is unclear whether similar differences exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease in Canada. We determined whether access to care differed between status Aboriginal people (Aboriginal people registered under the federal Indian Act) and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.
We identified 106 511 non-Aboriginal and 1182 Aboriginal patients with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). We compared outcomes, including hospital admissions, that may have been preventable with appropriate outpatient care (ambulatory-care-sensitive conditions) as well as use of specialist services, including visits to nephrologists and general internists.
Aboriginal people were almost twice as likely as non-Aboriginal people to be admitted to hospital for an ambulatory-care-sensitive condition (rate ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-2.13). Aboriginal people with severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-618981431
PubMed ID
18981441 View in PubMed
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Adapting and remodelling the US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self-Assessment tool for hospitals to be used to support national medication safety initiatives in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281586
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2016 Aug;24(4):262-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Ercan Celikkayalar
Minna Myllyntausta
Matthew Grissinger
Marja Airaksinen
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2016 Aug;24(4):262-70
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delphi Technique
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - prevention & control
Finland
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - standards
Pilot Projects
Risk Assessment - methods
Self-Assessment
Abstract
The US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' (ISMP) Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) tool for hospitals is a comprehensive tool for assessing safe medication practices in hospitals.
To adapt and remodel the ISMP MSSA tool for hospitals so that it can be used in individual wards in order to support long-term medication safety initiatives in Finland.
The MSSA tool was first adapted for Finnish hospital settings by a four-round (applicability, desirability and feasibility were evaluated) Delphi consensus method (14 panellists), and then remodelled by organizing the items into a new order which is consistent with the order of the ward-based pharmacotherapy plan recommended by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The adapted and remodelled tool was pilot tested in eight central hospital wards.
The original MSSA tool (231 items under ten key elements) was modified preliminarily before the Delphi rounds and 117 items were discarded, leaving 114 items for Delphi evaluation. The panel suggested 36 new items of which 23 were accepted. A total of 114 items (including 91 original and 23 new items) were accepted and remodelled under six new components that were pilot tested. The pilot test found the tool time-consuming but useful.
It was possible to adapt the ISMP's MSSA tool for another hospital setting. The modified tool can be used for a hospital pharmacy coordinated audit which supports long-term medication safety initiatives, particularly the establishment of ward-based pharmacotherapy plans as guided by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health.
PubMed ID
26811257 View in PubMed
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Adapting the US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self Assessment tool for community pharmacies in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128089
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2012 Feb;20(1):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Tuula Teinilä
Suvi Halmepuro-Jaatinen
Kirsi Yritys
Katri Manni
Marja Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2012 Feb;20(1):15-24
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Pharmacy Services - standards
Delphi Technique
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Pharmacists - standards
Pilot Projects
Quality of Health Care
Self-Assessment
Abstract
To adapt a US Institute for Safe Medication Practices' Medication Safety Self Assessment (MSSA) tool to, and test its usefulness in, Finnish community pharmacies.
A three-round Delphi survey was used to adapt self-assessment characteristics of the US MSSA tool to Finnish requirements, and to obtain a consensus on the feasibility and significance of these characteristics in assessing the safety of medication practices in community pharmacies. The Delphi modified self-assessment tool was piloted in 18 community pharmacies in order to refine the tool, using a questionnaire containing structured and open-ended questions.
A total of 211 self-assessment characteristics were accepted to the self-assessment tool for pilot use by expert panellists in the Delphi rounds. Most pilot users considered the tool as useful in: identifying medication safety targets for development; medication safety assessment; and identifying the strengths of medication safety. The substance of the self-assessment tool was considered as comprehensive and essential for medication safety. Most criticism was regarding: the multiplicity of self-assessment characteristics; interpretation of some characteristics; and that all the characteristics were not yet available. After the modification, according to the pilot users' comments, the final Finnish tool consisted of 230 medication safety characteristics.
The study indicated the feasibility of adapting a US medication safety self-assessment tool for use in community pharmacy practice in Finland. More efforts should be made to familiarise Finnish community pharmacists with the self-assessment tool and its benefits, and get them to use the tool as part of their long-term quality improvement.
PubMed ID
22236176 View in PubMed
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Admission criteria in short-term geriatric assessment units: a Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184394
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charo Rodríguez
Marie-Jeanne Kergoat
Judith Latour
Paule Lebel
André-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Area of Health Services and Policy Research, 515-517, Pine Avenue, Room 10, Montreal (Quebec) H2W 1S4. charo.rodriguez@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delphi Technique
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Hospital Units - utilization
Humans
Patient Admission - standards
Patient Selection
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
In recent years, short-term geriatric care units that operate using an interdisciplinary approach have been established in Quebec and elsewhere, in order to provide frail elderly persons with better health care. The purpose of this study is to determine criteria that target the greatest number of individuals most likely to benefit from hospitalization in this type of care unit.
A Delphi survey was conducted. The panel of experts consisted of 54 physicians and nurses working in short-term geriatric care units in Quebec. Three questionnaires were mailed and 4-level Likert scales were used. Median values, and 25th and 75th percentiles to a maximum of 2, were chosen a priori as the definition of consensus.
The survey used 14 inclusion criteria and 17 exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were divided into two categories and exclusion criteria were divided into four.
A typical clinical profile of a patient who should be admitted to a STGCU emerges: an elderly person presenting multiple pathologies, acute or sub-acute functional disability, and often related psychosocial problems. The instrument developed by this project is a practical guide for professionals in STGAUs as well as those responsible for allocating resources in the health care system.
PubMed ID
12873093 View in PubMed
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[A global, evidence-based consensus on the definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the pediatric population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140093
Source
Arch Pediatr. 2010 Nov;17(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-2010

The Alberta Breakthrough Pain Assessment Tool for cancer patients: a validation study using a delphi process and patient think-aloud interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159465
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008 Feb;35(2):136-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Neil A Hagen
Carla Stiles
Cheryl Nekolaichuk
Patricia Biondo
Linda E Carlson
Kim Fisher
Robin Fainsinger
Author Affiliation
Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. neilha@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008 Feb;35(2):136-52
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Delphi Technique
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Neoplasms - complications
Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Pain Measurement - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Breakthrough pain is a prevalent cancer pain syndrome, and research is needed to identify more effective interventions to manage it. A validated tool to assess breakthrough pain in a standard and reliable manner is urgently needed to support the conduct of clinical trials in breakthrough pain. To address this need, we developed a breakthrough pain assessment tool for research purposes. The current study was undertaken to gather validity evidence for this breakthrough pain assessment tool, using a Delphi process involving an expert panel review, followed by a think-aloud process involving patients with cancer-related breakthrough pain. Two expert panels were formed: a national panel (within Canada; n=16) and an international panel (including experts from North America, UK, Europe, the Middle East, Australia, and New Zealand; n=22). Each panel participated in one anonymous survey round. Response rates were 56% (national panel) and 73% (international panel). The Delphi process revealed substantial consensus on the content of the tool, which increased between rounds of review. The overall level of agreement with the tool, averaged over the four evaluated aspects of all items, was 80% among national panelists and 88% among international panelists. Nine patients completed the think-aloud study. They were able to understand and complete the tool and provided specific direction on its improvement. The validity evidence gathered in this study suggests the Alberta Breakthrough Pain Assessment Tool is conceptually grounded and is understandable by patients and clinicians. Further validation of this tool as an assessment measure within clinical trials research is warranted.
PubMed ID
18178370 View in PubMed
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Alcohol Policies and Alcoholic Cirrhosis Mortality in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276628
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2015;12:E177
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Scott E Hadland
Ziming Xuan
Jason G Blanchette
Timothy C Heeren
Monica H Swahn
Timothy S Naimi
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2015;12:E177
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Cluster analysis
Delphi Technique
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
State Government
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Stronger alcohol policies predict decreased alcohol consumption and binge drinking in the United States. We examined the relationship between the strength of states' alcohol policies and alcoholic cirrhosis mortality rates.
We used the Alcohol Policy Scale (APS), a validated assessment of policies of the 50 US states and Washington DC, to quantify the efficacy and implementation of 29 policies. State APS scores (theoretical range, 0-100) for each year from 1999 through 2008 were compared with age-adjusted alcoholic cirrhosis death rates that occurred 3 years later. We used Poisson regression accounting for state-level clustering and adjusting for race/ethnicity, college education, insurance status, household income, religiosity, policing rates, and urbanization.
Age-adjusted alcoholic cirrhosis mortality rates varied significantly across states; they were highest among males, among residents in states in the West census region, and in states with a high proportion of American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Higher APS scores were associated with lower mortality rates among females (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.91 per 10-point increase in APS score; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.84-0.99) but not among males (adjusted IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90-1.04). Among non-AI/AN decedents, higher APS scores were also associated with lower alcoholic cirrhosis mortality rates among both sexes combined (adjusted IRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97). Policies were more strongly associated with lower mortality rates among those living in the Northeast and West census regions than in other regions.
Stronger alcohol policy environments are associated with lower alcoholic cirrhosis mortality rates. Future studies should identify underlying reasons for racial/ethnic and regional differences in this relationship.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26469950 View in PubMed
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An assessment form for clinical nursing education: a Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177911
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Nov;48(3):291-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Anna Löfmark
Ingrid Thorell-Ekstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, University of Gävle, S-801 76 Gävle, Sweden. anna.lofmark@hig.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Nov;48(3):291-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delphi Technique
Education, Nursing
Educational Measurement - methods
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
This paper reports a study to develop further the existing assessment form and to capture new aspects of assessment for the nursing profession of the future for inclusion in the form.
Since nursing education became part of the higher education system, the assessment of clinical periods of the programme has become more complicated and requirements are more demanding. Changes in the health care sector, such as demographic changes and shorter hospitalization, create demands upon the independent nursing role of the future. Many educational documents, such as an assessment form, must continuously be up-dated and adapted to changes in society.
A Delphi study concerning the content of this assessment form was carried out using two rounds. Through this process, an expert panel gave their opinions about the form and possible changes to it.
There was general acceptance of the content in the current assessment form. Suggested changes were the addition of two factors concerning collaboration with the family and society, and development of the student's independence. Two new area headings were suggested: one about ability to use the nursing process, and the other about development of a professional stance.
The suggested changes in the assessment form match expected changes in the health care sector and the demands of an academic nursing education.
PubMed ID
15488043 View in PubMed
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174 records – page 1 of 18.