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121 records – page 2 of 13.

Challenges faced by service providers in the delivery of Assertive Community Treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174554
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):115-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Terry Krupa
Shirley Eastabrook
Peter Beattie
Richard Carriere
Dianne McIntyre
Ruth Woodman
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):115-27
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Assertiveness
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Comprehensive Health Care - trends
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health services research - trends
Humans
Ontario
Patient Admission - trends
Psychotic Disorders - rehabilitation
Social Support
Abstract
This qualitative study examined the delivery of Assertive Community Treatment from the perspective of service providers of 4 ACT teams in southeastern Ontario. Overall, providers were positive about their involvement with ACT. Eight tensions experienced in the context of delivering services emerged: negotiating governance structures; providing 24-hour coverage; balancing the clinical-administrative responsibilities of team leaders; accessing hospital beds; meeting local population needs; integrating treatment and rehabilitation; changing services to meet changes in the population being served; and implementing ambiguous ACT standards. Framing these challenges in the context of ACT structures and the broader community mental health system, the study suggests possibilities for the ongoing development of the model to facilitate the realization of the ACT vision.
PubMed ID
15920886 View in PubMed
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Changes in frailty-related characteristics of the hip fracture population and their implications for healthcare services: evidence from Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113289
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Oct;24(10):2713-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
M. Auais
S. Morin
L. Nadeau
L. Finch
N. Mayo
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Health Innovation, Ivey Business School, Western University, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Oct;24(10):2713-24
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sarcopenia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study provides evidence that a number of frailty-related characteristics (older age, de novo admission to long-term care (LTC), comorbidities [Charlson Index, osteoporosis, osteoporosis risk factors, sarcopenia risk factors, and dementia]) have increased in the hip fracture population from 2001-2008. This will have significant impact on community resources, as the number of people discharged to the community is also increasing.
The aim of this study is to estimate secular changes in the prevalence of selected frailty-related characteristics among the hip fracture population in the Canadian province of Quebec (2001-2008) and the potential impact of these changes on healthcare services.
The Quebec hospitalization database was used to identify nontraumatic hip fractures for the purposes of calculating age- and sex-specific rates. Also estimated were time trends for selected frailty-related characteristics and discharge destinations.
A significant decline in fracture rates was evident for all age groups except for those
PubMed ID
23743612 View in PubMed
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[Changes in Scandinavian health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227063
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(5):142
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P O Brogren
M. Brommels
Author Affiliation
Länssjukvårdschef, Länssjukvården i Södra Alvsborg, Borås.
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(5):142
Date
1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Control
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Health Services - economics - trends
Humans
Scandinavia
Social Change
PubMed ID
2047233 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing elderly in a changing society. Danish elderly in the next century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223633
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):232-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
H. Friis
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):232-4
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Demography
Denmark
Forecasting
Housing - trends
Humans
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retirement - trends
Social Change
Abstract
A cross-sectional and multidisciplinary study on the situation of the elderly in Denmark at the beginning of the next century was undertaken in the late 1980s. The intention was to give a picture of the future cohorts of elderly, and their expectations for old age. The study also looked into the ways in which future societal developments might affect the situation of the elderly. In order to test a number of hypotheses on the future elderly and their preferences for life when they grow older, 1200 persons in the age groups 40-44, 50-54, and 60-64 years old were interviewed. Further, a number of studies were commissioned on developments which may affect the elderly with regard to health, housing, family, work and retirement, financial conditions, leisure activities and political participation. A main conclusion is that the future elderly in most areas--be it financial conditions, health, housing education--will be in a more favourable position than their predecessors after retirement. But there will still be a minority who suffer a hard life. They are the people whose finances are weak, whose health is impaired, and who lack social contacts.
PubMed ID
1638884 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Paediatrician. 1980;9(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
H. Hultin
Source
Paediatrician. 1980;9(1):35-40
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth rate
Child
Child Health Services - trends
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunization
Infant
Infant mortality
Male
Maternal mortality
Abstract
The following article presents an overall picture of child health care delivery in Finland. The history and priorities of the Finnish Child Care Services are discussed with statistical data regarding birth rate, mortality and immunization.
PubMed ID
7352099 View in PubMed
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Citizen perspectives on the future of healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123542
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lynn M Nagle
Barbara M Pitts
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Advisory, Consulting and Deals, Pricewaterhouse-Coopers LLP, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):40-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Community Health Services - trends
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Ontario
Public Opinion
Abstract
The Citizen's Reference Panel was created to engage the people of Ontario in a dialogue about the directions for the future sustainability of healthcare. The primary concerns raised during the course of the panellists' deliberations included the need to (1) create a much closer integration of the health system's many providers and institutions, (2) accelerate the deployment of e-health solutions across the health system and (3) continue to focus on improving access to care, especially primary care and expanded community care services to reduce the pressure on institutional care.
PubMed ID
22688204 View in PubMed
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Commentary: Indigenous Nursing - Learning from the Past to Strengthen the Future of Healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302780
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2018; 31(1):28-31
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Lea Bill
Leila Gillis
Author Affiliation
President, Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2018; 31(1):28-31
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Forecasting
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Inuits - education
Male
Nursing Care - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Nurse leaders, educators and employers work to address the challenges of providing optimal care to Indigenous people and communities in Canada, which is often further complicated by geography and isolation. The Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association (CINA) has responded to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada through partnerships with various levels of government, including the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of the new federal department of Indigenous Services Canada, to increase and better support Indigenous nurses in the healthcare system. Grounding nursing practice with the wisdom and strength of Indigenous knowledge, balanced with the perspectives of western ways of knowing is further facilitated when nursing students can be educated and supported closer to home. Learning in a supportive way, closer to where one lives, can allow for important family ties, cultural supports and practices to improve experiences and outcomes for students.
PubMed ID
29927380 View in PubMed
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Community-based treatment of psychiatric disorders in U.S.A. and Norway: insights for new service delivery systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73539
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):95-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
R J Kleiner
D. Drews
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):95-106
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Female
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Care Team - trends
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Social Environment
Social Support
United States
Abstract
This article reports on a successful community-based psychiatric treatment program in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and describes subsequent experiences seeking approval of similar programs in Philadelphia and in Oslo, Norway. Previous studies have shown that the Philadelphia community-based program, which used patient social networks and indigenous community workers assisted by psychological and psychiatric professionals, provided better treatment outcomes than traditional hospital programs and socioenvironmental treatment programs. On the basis of these experiences a new service delivery system was proposed which integrates patient social networks, community workers, and lay community organizations with mental health center professionals. Examination of differences in official responses to the proposal shows the importance of several factors, including the mental health bureaucracy's perception of patient potential, their openness to social psychological therapy, and the power struggles within the bureaucracy and the professional community.
PubMed ID
1506142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community psychiatric services in England and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239491
Source
Soc Psychiatry. 1985;20(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

121 records – page 2 of 13.