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119 records – page 1 of 12.

A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130778
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Aura Kagan
Author Affiliation
Education and Applied Research, Aphasia Institute, Toronto, Canada. akagan@aphasia.ca
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphasia - psychology - rehabilitation
Awareness
Communication
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Motivation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Indicators, Health Care - trends
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
Abstract
Aphasia centers are in an excellent position to contribute to the broad definition of health by the World Health Organization: the ability to live life to its full potential. An expansion of this definition by the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) forms the basis for a user-friendly and ICF-compatible framework for planning interventions that ensure maximum real-life outcome and impact for people with aphasia and their families. This article describes Living with Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement and its practical application to aphasia centers in the areas of direct service, outcome measurement, and advocacy and awareness. Examples will be drawn from the Aphasia Institute in Toronto. A case will be made for all aphasia centers to use the ICF or an adaptation of it to further the work of this sector and strengthen its credibility.
PubMed ID
21968558 View in PubMed
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Aligning career development with organizational goals: working towards the development of a strong and sustainable workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152039
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite
Sandra Carlton
Brenda Bass
Author Affiliation
Programs and Chief Nursing Officer, Providence Care, Kingston, ON, Canada. saxebram@providencecare.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Personnel - education - trends
Health Promotion - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Pilot Projects
Social Change
Staff Development - trends
Abstract
The rapidly changing world of healthcare is faced with many challenges, not the least of which is a diminishing workforce. Healthcare organizations must develop multiple strategies, not only to attract and retain employees, but also to ensure that workers are prepared for continuous change in the workplace, are working at their full scope of practice and are committed to, and accountable for, the provision of high-quality care. There is evidence that by creating a healthier workplace, improved patient care will follow. Aligning Healthy Workplace Initiatives with an organization's strategic goals, corporate culture and vision reinforces their importance within the organization. In this paper, we describe an innovative pilot to assess a career development program, one of multiple Healthy Workplace Initiatives taking place at Providence Care in Kingston, Ontario in support of our three strategic goals. The results of the pilot were very encouraging; subsequent success in obtaining funding from HealthForceOntario has allowed the implementation of a sustainable program of career development within the organization. More work is required to evaluate its long-term effectiveness.
PubMed ID
19289913 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the situation of some urgent surgical services during the reform period in health care system in Adjara].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166006
Source
Georgian Med News. 2006 Nov;(140):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
M V Kadzhaia
G N Tsetskhladze
Source
Georgian Med News. 2006 Nov;(140):100-5
Date
Nov-2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Emergencies
General Surgery - trends
Health Care Reform
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Abstract
The reform that started in 1995 in health care system still is in progress in our country. It is necessary to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of past period in order to achieving the objectives. For this aim we used the statistical facts gathered during the reforms and according to those data we tried to analyse the existing situation of urgent surgical service. We describe the main problems that would be the best way to solve them in the future. The results show that the urgent surgical help in a hospital still has enough reserve for optimization and reorganization, but it is clear, that for field working improvement there is necessity of the appropriate reformation of institutional organization, financing, program maintaining and human resources.
PubMed ID
17179601 View in PubMed
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Any government plan must offer total care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254684
Source
Ont Dent. 1973 May;50(5):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1973

The boom, bust and echo generations and the future of cardiovascular disease: an interview with Dr David Foot.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196247
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1475-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
D. Foot
Author Affiliation
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1475-6
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Demography
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
11137912 View in PubMed
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Canada's NHI: a physician's evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247370
Source
Hosp Prog. 1979 Apr;60(4):54-9, 76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979
Author
F P Doyle
Source
Hosp Prog. 1979 Apr;60(4):54-9, 76
Date
Apr-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Health Expenditures
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Insurance Benefits
Insurance, Health - trends
Manitoba
National health programs - organization & administration
Physicians
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
A physician in Manitoba reports that a national health care system has worked well in Canada, particularly for poor people and for governments concerned about the equitable and universal delivery of health care, as well as about rising health costs. Physicians, however, find the greatest problems are their own low salary and their lack of impact on government policy.
PubMed ID
105983 View in PubMed
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Can life expectancies be used to determine if health promotion works?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217988
Source
Am J Health Promot. 1994 Jul-Aug;8(6):449-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Adrian
N. Layne
J. Moreau
Author Affiliation
Social Evaluation and Research Department, Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 1994 Jul-Aug;8(6):449-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Female
Forecasting
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Models, Statistical
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Abstract
The goal of this study was to develop a method to measure the impact and cost-effectiveness of health promotion.
Age- and sex-specific changes in life expectancy in Canada between 1970 to 1972 and 1985 to 1987, after the introduction of national health insurance (1970) and health promotion (1975), are used to assess the impact due to biological hardiness, improvements in the health care field, and the effects of health promotion.
The subjects were the total male and female population of Canada between the years 1970 to 1972 and 1985 to 1987.
Life expectancy by years of age by sex was the measurement used.
A method is presented that allows the calculation of the differential effects of health promotion, health care, and biological hardiness on changes in life expectancy based on sequential subtraction of life expectancies for one-year age cohorts over a 15-year period. Results were obtained for each year of age for men and women, showing gender and age differences in the relative impact of the three factors. In this illustrative example using Canadian data, health promotion was found to have less impact on longevity than health care or biological hardiness. However, of the three, health promotion was the most cost-effective.
This method can be used to quantify changes in life span due to health promotion, health care, and biological hardiness for men and women at each year of age and to relate this to health expenditures for the whole population. The method is limited in that it cannot determine the relative impact of other factors that can affect life expectancy such as environmental changes or social trends.
PubMed ID
10147274 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.