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Access to care, health status, and health disparities in the United States and Canada: results of a cross-national population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169088
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Karen E Lasser
David U Himmelstein
Steffie Woolhandler
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass, USA. klasser@challiance.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - utilization
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs - economics - standards - utilization
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage
Abstract
We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of medical services in the United States and Canada and compared disparities according to race, income, and immigrant status.
We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we used logistic regression to analyze country as a predictor of access to care, quality of care, and satisfaction with care and as a predictor of disparities in these measures.
In multivariate analyses, US respondents (compared with Canadians) were less likely to have a regular doctor, more likely to have unmet health needs, and more likely to forgo needed medicines. Disparities on the basis of race, income, and immigrant status were present in both countries but were more extreme in the United States.
United States residents are less able to access care than are Canadians. Universal coverage appears to reduce most disparities in access to care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16735628 View in PubMed
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Adding value while saving dollars: unleashing the potential of a national, integrated approach to home and community care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146214
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;9(4):41-6; discussion 52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Teresa Petch
Judith Shamian
Author Affiliation
Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;9(4):41-6; discussion 52-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - economics - organization & administration
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Home Care Services - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Abstract
This commentary by Victorian Order of Nurses Canada, written in response to "Getting What We Pay For? The Value-for-Money Challenge," by McGrail, Zierler and Ip, answers four key questions about Canada's home and community care sector: (1) What are our objectives? (2) Where do we achieve good value now? (3) Where and why are we failing? and (4) What will help us do better? We conclude that although the home and community care sector offers great promise in meeting the evolving health and social needs of Canadians, it is not living up to its potential. We propose the development of a national, integrated approach to home and community care to help Canadians remain healthy and independent in their homes. This would represent a wise financial investment for governments and would contribute to the long-term health of Canadians.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2009;9(4):8-2220057203
PubMed ID
20057208 View in PubMed
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Addressing health inequalities in the US: a life course health development approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128306
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Mar;74(5):671-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Neal Halfon
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Healthier Children Families and Communities, United States. nhalfon@ucla.edu
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Mar;74(5):671-3
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22209674 View in PubMed
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Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
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Affordable health care for all Canadians?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179267
Source
Crit Care Med. 2004 Jul;32(7):1614-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Dan Teres
John Rapoport
Philip Jacobs
Source
Crit Care Med. 2004 Jul;32(7):1614-5
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Humans
Intensive Care Units - standards
Ontario
Respiration, Artificial - adverse effects - economics - utilization
Severity of Illness Index
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2004 Dec;32(12):2564; author reply 256415599184
Comment On: Crit Care Med. 2004 Jul;32(7):1504-915241095
PubMed ID
15241116 View in PubMed
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Alternative funding and delivery models: practice and prospects in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220892
Source
J Ambul Care Manage. 1993 Jul;16(3):19-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993

[An allergic nation--allergies as a public health problem. Finnish Medical Society Duodecim, Finnish Academy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192225
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(24):2615-25
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1998
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 Sep;68(6):29-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
R I Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 Sep;68(6):29-30
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Control - methods
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Health Behavior
Health Care Costs - trends
Health Services Research
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Workers' Compensation
PubMed ID
1834507 View in PubMed
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An assessment of progress towards universal health coverage in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260667
Source
Lancet. 2014 Dec 13;384(9960):2164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2014
Author
Robert Marten
Diane McIntyre
Claudia Travassos
Sergey Shishkin
Wang Longde
Srinath Reddy
Jeanette Vega
Source
Lancet. 2014 Dec 13;384(9960):2164-71
Date
Dec-13-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brazil
China
Delivery of Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Healthcare Financing
Humans
India
Russia
South Africa
Universal Coverage - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS) represent almost half the world's population, and all five national governments recently committed to work nationally, regionally, and globally to ensure that universal health coverage (UHC) is achieved. This analysis reviews national efforts to achieve UHC. With a broad range of health indicators, life expectancy (ranging from 53 years to 73 years), and mortality rate in children younger than 5 years (ranging from 10·3 to 44·6 deaths per 1000 livebirths), a review of progress in each of the BRICS countries shows that each has some way to go before achieving UHC. The BRICS countries show substantial, and often similar, challenges in moving towards UHC. On the basis of a review of each country, the most pressing problems are: raising insufficient public spending; stewarding mixed private and public health systems; ensuring equity; meeting the demands for more human resources; managing changing demographics and disease burdens; and addressing the social determinants of health. Increases in public funding can be used to show how BRICS health ministries could accelerate progress to achieve UHC. Although all the BRICS countries have devoted increased resources to health, the biggest increase has been in China, which was probably facilitated by China's rapid economic growth. However, the BRICS country with the second highest economic growth, India, has had the least improvement in public funding for health. Future research to understand such different levels of prioritisation of the health sector in these countries could be useful. Similarly, the role of strategic purchasing in working with powerful private sectors, the effect of federal structures, and the implications of investment in primary health care as a foundation for UHC could be explored. These issues could serve as the basis on which BRICS countries focus their efforts to share ideas and strategies.
PubMed ID
24793339 View in PubMed
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344 records – page 1 of 35.