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Development of an individualized service plan tool and rules for case management in Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148406
Source
Care Manag J. 2009;10(3):89-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Dominique Somme
Lucie Bonin
Paule Lebel
Réjean Hébert
François Blanchard
Author Affiliation
Geriatrics Department, European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, France. dominique.somme@egp.aphp.fr
Source
Care Manag J. 2009;10(3):89-99
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case Management
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Care
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Program Development
Quebec
Abstract
From past experience with integrated service delivery, there appears to be a need for a clinical tool to help case managers plan, monitor, and coordinate services. In this context the Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services created a task force to suggest improvements to the Individualized Service Plan tool included in the Multiclientele Assessment Tool. This article reports the findings of this multidisciplinary task force working with various clienteles (older, with physical or mental disabilities, mental diseases). Based on a literature review and recent results from the Program of Research on the Integration of Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy, the task force proposed a dynamic, concise, user-friendly tool and a clear definition of how it should be used. The Individualized Service Plan must list the patient's needs, with an orientation regarding the action plan for each, and a list of services allocated in response to these needs that work in the defined direction. The tool must also contain a section for analyzing variations between the services needed and allocated. This tool was presented to case managers for validation and received an enthusiastic response. It should be implemented in the coming years in the provincial Multiclientele Assessment Tool.
PubMed ID
19772206 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of health care delivery integration: the case of the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264947
Source
Health Policy. 2014 Apr;115(2-3):128-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Igor Sheiman
Vladimir Shevski
Source
Health Policy. 2014 Apr;115(2-3):128-37
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration - standards
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs - organization & administration - standards
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
Fragmentation in organization and discontinuities in the provision of medical care are problems in all health systems, whether it is the mixed public-private one in the USA, national health services in the UK, or insurance based one in Western Europe and Russia. In all of these countries a major challenge is to strengthen integration in order to enhance efficiency and health outcomes. This article assesses issues related to fragmentation and integration in conceptual terms and argues that key attributes of integration are teamwork, coordination and continuity of care. It then presents a summary of service integration problems in Russia and the results of a large survey of physicians concerning the attributes of integration. It is argued that characteristics of the national service delivery model don't ensure integration. The Semashko model is not an equivalent to the integrated model. Big organizational forms of service provision, like polyclinics and integrated hospital-polyclinics, don't have higher scores of integration indicators than smaller ones. Proposals to improve integration in Russia are presented with the focus on the regular evaluation of integration/fragmentation, regulation of integration activities, enhancing the role of PHC providers, economic incentives.
PubMed ID
24461718 View in PubMed
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[Experience in cross training within the context if integration of patient care team services in southeast Montreal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170030
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2005;24(1):35-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Michel Perreault
Jean-Pierre Bonin
Renée Veilleux
Geneviève Alary
Isabelle Ferland
Author Affiliation
Hôpital Douglas et Université McGill.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2005;24(1):35-49
Date
2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Confidentiality
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Quebec
Questionnaires
Substance-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Abstract
Improved functioning in the mental health resource network can be guided by cross training procedures involving exchanges of clinical personnel. In 2003, Douglas Hospital along with the Centres locaux de services communautaires (CLSCs) and community organizations in southwest Montreal conducted a pilot project on training exchanges involving 14 clinical teams and 21 workers. Analysis of self-administered questionnaires as well as content analysis of a focus group revealed a very high degree of satisfaction with the project. However, differences of opinion were noted regarding the content and orientation of the training and ways to ensure client confidentiality. The very strong demand for participation in the training courses offered, as well as the high level of satisfaction on the part of participants, testifies to the relevance of new series of personnel rotations. These rotations could be broadened so as to improve the continuity of services offered to people who have concomitant diagnoses of mental health and drug addiction problems.
PubMed ID
16568620 View in PubMed
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The IMCO scheme as a tool in developing team-based treatment for people with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159315
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jan-Feb;14(1):69-77
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laila Launsø
Lasse Skovgaard
Author Affiliation
The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jan-Feb;14(1):69-77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
Complementary Therapies - organization & administration - standards
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Family Practice - organization & administration - standards
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, Chronic Disease - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Multiple Sclerosis - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Evaluation
Abstract
The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society (a patient organization) has initiated a research-based bridge-building and integrative treatment project to take place from 2004 to 2010 at a specialized MS hospital. The background for initiating the project was an increasing use of alternative treatment documented among persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). From PwMS there has been an increasing demand upon The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society to initiate the project.
The overall purpose of the project is to examine whether collaboration between 5 conventional and 5 alternative practitioners may optimize treatment results for people who have multiple sclerosis (MS). The specific aim of this paper is to present tools used in developing collaboration between the conventional and alternative practitioners.
Two main tools in developing collaboration between the practitioners are described: (1) the planning and conduction of 4 practitioner-researcher seminars in the prephase of the project before recruiting patients with MS; and (2) the IMCO scheme (which is an abbreviation of Intervention, Mechanism, Context, and Outcomes). This tool was developed and used at practitioner-researcher seminars to make visible the different practitioners' treatment models and the patient-related treatment courses.
Examples of IMCO schemes filled in by the medical doctor and the classical homeopath illustrate significant differences in interventions, assumptions concerning effect mechanisms, and awareness of contexts facilitating and inhibiting the intervention to generate the outcomes expected and obtained.
The IMCO schemes have been an important tool in developing the team-based treatment approaches and to facilitate self-reflection on the professional role as a health care provider. We assume that the IMCO scheme will be of real value in the development of effective treatment based on collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners.
PubMed ID
18199016 View in PubMed
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Interprofessional and integrated care of the elderly in a family health team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121610
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Aug;58(8):e436-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ainsley Moore
Christopher Patterson
Joy White
Shelly T House
John J Riva
Kalpana Nair
Allison Brown
Amjed Kadhim-Saleh
David McCann
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON. amoore@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Aug;58(8):e436-41
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Models, organizational
Ontario
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Family physicians provide most of the care for the frail elderly population, but many challenges and barriers can lead to difficulties with fragmented, ineffective, and inefficient services.
To improve the quality, efficiency, and coordination of care for the frail elderly living in the community and to enhance geriatric and interprofessional skills for providers and learners.
The Seniors Collaborative Care Program used an interprofessional, shared-care, geriatric model. The feasibility of the program was evaluated through a pilot study conducted between November 2008 and June 2009 at Stonechurch Family Health Centre, part of the McMaster Family Health Team. The core team comprised a nurse practitioner, an FP, and a registered practical nurse. Additional team members included a pharmacist, a dietitian, a social worker, and a visiting geriatrician. Twenty-five seniors were evaluated through the pilot program. Patients were assessed within 5 weeks of initial contact. Patients and practitioners valued timely, accessible, preventive, and multidisciplinary aspects of care. The nurse practitioner's role was prominent in the program, while the geriatrician's clinical role was focused efficiently.
The family health team is ideally positioned to deliver shared care for the frail elderly. Our model allowed for a short referral time and easy access, which might allow seniors to remain in their environment of choice.
Notes
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Sep;90(9):1523-3119735780
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 Sep;55(9):901-1.e1-519752260
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009 Oct;13 Spec No:16-2320057244
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Nov 3;304(17):1936-4321045100
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Nov;58(11):2197-20420977435
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Oct 16;135(8 Pt 2):686-9311601951
Cites: Gerontologist. 2002 Dec;42(6):835-4212451165
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Dec 11;288(22):2836-4512472325
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):982-712841804
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;2(4):305-915335128
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1982-1983;17(1):37-497183759
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1999 Sep;45:2143-4, 2147, 2159-6010509226
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Oct;59(10):1149-5716015256
Cites: JAMA. 2006 May 10;295(18):2148-5716684985
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 May;54(5):849-5216696754
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Jul;54(7):1136-4116866688
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Sep;54(9):1453-6216970658
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Feb 26;178(5):548-5618299540
PubMed ID
22893345 View in PubMed
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Pediatric weight management programs in Canada: where, what and how?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141208
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e58-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Geoff D C Ball
Kathryn A Ambler
Jean-Pierre Chanoine
Author Affiliation
Dept of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. geoff.ball@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e58-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Canada
Child
Child Behavior
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Obesity - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Organizational Objectives
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Risk Reduction Behavior
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Our purpose was to conduct a national environmental scan of pediatric weight management programs in Canada. Data were entered by program representatives regarding the history, structure, and function of their weight management programs using an online survey that our team developed in partnership with the Canadian Obesity Network ( www.obesitynetwork.ca ). Of the 18 programs that were identified, all included multidisciplinary teams that take a family-centred, lifestyle/behavioural therapeutic approach; health services were accessed primarily through physician referral. Most programs were launched in the past five years with public funding and enrolled ~125 clients/year into one-on-one and/or group-based weight management care. Although many participated in research and were affiliated with academic institutions, most did not systematically evaluate their obesity-related programming. Based on these observations, recommendations related to program evaluation, health services delivery, and network collaborations are provided to inform future directions for research and clinical care that have both domestic and international relevance.
PubMed ID
20799914 View in PubMed
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Professional background and the comprehension of family-centredness of rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136303
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2012 Jan;38(1):70-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
I. Jeglinsky
I. Autti-Rämö
E. Brogren Carlberg
Author Affiliation
Arcada, University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland. ira.jeglinsky@arcada.fi
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2012 Jan;38(1):70-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Family Health
Finland
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Infant
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Physical Therapy Specialty - organization & administration
Professional-Family Relations
Psychometrics
Abstract
Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in several areas of functioning, and they need long-lasting rehabilitation with a clear focus on the individual's needs. Finnish guidelines emphasize family-centred service. The values of family-centred service are widely known, but how the principles of family-centred service are adopted in clinical practice is not well documented. The objective of this study was to analyse the family-centred behaviour of professionals working with children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.
A translated version of the Measure of Processes of Care for Service Providers (MPOC-SP) questionnaire was used to evaluate the family-centred service. The questionnaire was sent to all the professionals in the multidisciplinary rehabilitation teams at all the hospitals and governmental special schools treating children and adolescents with cerebral palsy in Finland (n= 327). Furthermore, 438 physiotherapy service providers working in the children's home region were invited to participate.
A total of 201 multidisciplinary team members and 311 physiotherapy service providers completed the questionnaire. Both the team members and the service providers generally rated their family-centred behaviour positively. There was statistically significant difference in how the team members in the multidisciplinary teams self-assessed their family-centred service. Physiotherapists working in multidisciplinary teams rated their family-centred service higher than physiotherapy service providers. The professional's apprehension of family-centred service increased with work experience.
Professional background and professional context seem to affect the apprehension of family-centred service. Also work experience and being part of a multidisciplinary team have an influence on how the professionals embrace the family-centred service delivered. The MPOC-SP can be used to identify areas for improvement.
PubMed ID
21392054 View in PubMed
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