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Evaluation of the implementation of an integrated primary care network for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk in Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129748
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sylvie Provost
Raynald Pineault
Pierre Tousignant
Marjolaine Hamel
Roxane Borgès Da Silva
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, Canada. sprovost@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2011;12:126
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Networks - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Disease Management
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Organizational Objectives
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Primary Health Care - utilization
Primary prevention - methods
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quebec
Questionnaires
Research Design
Abstract
The goal of this project is to evaluate the implementation of an integrated and interdisciplinary program for prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk (PCMR). The intervention is based on the Chronic Care Model. The study will evaluate the implementation of the PCMR in 6 of the 12 health and social services centres (CSSS) in Montréal, and the effects of the PCMR on patients and the practice of their primary care physicians up to 40 months following implementation, as well as the sustainability of the program. Objectives are: 1-to evaluate the effects of the PCMR and their persistence on patients registered in the program and the practice of their primary care physicians, by implementation site and degree of exposure to the program; 2-to assess the degree of implementation of PCMR in each CSSS territory and identify related contextual factors; 3-to establish the relationships between the effects observed, the degree of PCMR implementation and the related contextual factors; 4-to assess the impact of the PCMR on strengthening local services networks.
The evaluation will use a mixed design that includes two complementary research strategies. The first strategy is similar to a quasi-experimental "before-after" design, based on a quantitative approach; it will look at the program's effects and their variations among the six territories. The effects analysis will use data from a clinical database and from questionnaires completed by participating patients and physicians. Over 3000 patients will be recruited. The second strategy corresponds to a multiple case study approach, where each of the six CSSS constitutes a case. With this strategy, qualitative methods will set out the context of implementation using data from semi-structured interviews with program managers. The quantitative data will be analyzed using linear or multilevel models complemented with an interpretive approach to qualitative data analysis.
Our study will identify contextual factors associated with the effectiveness, successful implementation and sustainability of such a program. The contextual information will enable us to extrapolate our results to other contexts with similar conditions.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01326130.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22074614 View in PubMed
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A system of integrated care for older persons with disabilities in Canada: results from a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169803
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Apr;61(4):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
François Béland
Howard Bergman
Paule Lebel
A Mark Clarfield
Pierre Tousignant
André-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Luc Dallaire
Author Affiliation
Solidage Research Group, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Apr;61(4):367-73
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Health Expenditures
Health Services - economics - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Social Work - organization & administration
Abstract
Care for elderly persons with disabilities is usually characterized by fragmentation, often leading to more intrusive and expensive forms of care such as hospitalization and institutionalization. There has been increasing interest in the ability of integrated models to improve health, satisfaction, and service utilization outcomes.
A program of integrated care for vulnerable community-dwelling elderly persons (SIPA [French acronym for System of Integrated Care for Older Persons]) was compared to usual care with a randomized control trial. SIPA offered community-based care with local agencies responsible for the full range and coordination of community and institutional (acute and long-term) health and social services. Primary outcomes were utilization and public costs of institutional and community care. Secondary outcomes included health status, satisfaction with care, caregiver burden, and out-of-pocket expenses.
Accessibility was increased for health and social home care with increased intensification of home health care. There was a 50% reduction in hospital alternate level inpatient stays ("bed blockers") but no significant differences in utilization and costs of emergency department, hospital acute inpatient, and nursing home stays. For all study participants, average community costs per person were C dollar 3390 higher in the SIPA group but institutional costs were C dollar 3770 lower with, as hypothesized, no difference in total overall costs per person in the two groups. Satisfaction was increased for SIPA caregivers with no increase in caregiver burden or out-of-pocket costs. As expected, there was no difference in health outcomes.
Integrated systems appear to be feasible and have the potential to reduce hospital and nursing home utilization without increasing costs.
Notes
Comment In: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 May;61(5):472-316720743
PubMed ID
16611703 View in PubMed
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