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26 records – page 1 of 3.

[Age and the tempo of the progression of alcoholism in patients with a history of alcoholic delirium]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12760
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1985;85(2):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
N A Kornetov
V Ia Gubernik
V P Samokhvalov
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1985;85(2):259-62
Date
1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Computers
English Abstract
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Psychoses, Alcoholic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Statistics
Ukraine
Abstract
The differentiation of psychotic and non-psychotic forms of alcoholism on the basis of the epidemiological data on some clinical characteristics of alcohol pathology over the period of 1975-1982 has shown that the pathomorphism of the clinical manifestations of alcoholism and alcoholic psychosis depends on a complex of social and biological factors. A more considerable involvement of biological factors in determining the age of the onset of alcohol psychoses has been demonstrated. The clinico-anthropometric and clinico-statistical studies of 230 alcoholics of two age groups with a history of delirium tremens has prompted the conclusion as to a considerable influence of the age factor on the change in the clinical picture of the disease and its progression.
PubMed ID
3984614 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of psychogeriatric patient visits to a general hospital emergency room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212272
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Apr;41(3):175-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
R W Shulman
P. Marton
A. Fisher
C. Cohen
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Apr;41(3):175-80
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Geriatric Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Care Team - utilization
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
This study describes psychogeriatric patients who visit the Emergency Room (ER) in a teaching hospital with a comprehensive psychogeriatric service.
A survey assessing demographic and clinical characteristics was completed for every psychiatric ER patient during a 2-year period.
One hundred and seventy-three ER patients aged over 60 (mean age 71.2) were assessed. Fifty-three percent were previously known to the psychogeriatric service. The majority of these previously known psychogeriatric patients who used the ER suffered from mood disorders. The majority of new psychogeriatric patients seen in the ER had an organic brain syndrome (OBS).
Few OBS patients who visited the ER were previously known to the psychogeriatric service, but many new OBS patients accessed the psychogeriatric service via the ER. For patients with mood disorders, particularly if suicidal, the ER was used as part of their service delivery system.
PubMed ID
8722647 View in PubMed
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Cognitive function and health-related quality of life after delirium in connection with hip surgery. A six-month follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179522
Source
Orthop Nurs. 2004 May-Jun;23(3):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gill Sörensen Duppils
Karin Wikblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Orthop Nurs. 2004 May-Jun;23(3):195-203
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - nursing
Cognition
Counseling
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Disease Progression
Family - psychology
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Mass Screening
Mental Status Schedule
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Perioperative Care - methods - nursing
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Delirium is a serious psychiatric disorder, and elderly patients who undergo hip surgery are at higher risk for delirium development.
The purpose was to compare change in cognitive function and health-related quality of life 6 months after hip surgery in patients who experienced postoperative delirium with those who did not.
A total of 115 patients 75 years or older were included.
Screening for delirium was done using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th ed criteria. Cognitive function was measured with the Mini Mental State Examination and health-related quality of life with the SF-36.
Of the 115 patients, 32 became delirious during hospital stay (D group), whereas the remaining patients did not (NonD group). Both D and NonD groups scored lower on the Mini Mental State Examination at follow-up than during hospital stay, but the deterioration was significantly greater in the D group. At follow-up, health-related quality of life was improved in patients who were destined for hip replacement surgery but unchanged or impaired for those with hip fracture. Delirium onset in connection with hip fracture lowered the health-related quality of life even more. At follow-up, low cognitive function correlated with lower scoring in physical function. Greater knowledge about delirious patients' vulnerable positions related to lower cognition and life quality can improve rehabilitation and support for these patients.
PubMed ID
15211901 View in PubMed
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Comparison of frequency, risk factors, and time course of postoperative delirium in octogenarians after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262953
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;115(6):802-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2015
Author
Leslie S P Eide
Anette H Ranhoff
Bengt Fridlund
Rune Haaverstad
Karl Ove Hufthammer
Karel K J Kuiper
Jan Erik Nordrehaug
Tone M Norekvål
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 15;115(6):802-9
Date
Mar-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - therapy
Cognition
Comorbidity
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Elective Surgical Procedures
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Postoperative delirium (PD) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains to be explored. We sought to (1) determine the incidence of PD in octogenarians who underwent TAVI or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), (2) identify its risk factors, and (3) describe possible differences in the onset and course of PD between treatment groups. A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients aged =80 years with severe aortic stenosis who underwent elective TAVI or SAVR (N = 143) was conducted. The incidence of PD was assessed for 5 days using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Risk factors for PD were studied with logistic regression. Patients treated with TAVI were older (p =0.001), had lower cognitive scores (p = 0.007), and more co-morbidities (p = 0.003). Despite this, significantly fewer (p = 0.013) patients treated with TAVI (44%) experienced PD compared to patients treated with SAVR (66%). Undergoing SAVR (p = 0.02) and having lower cognitive function (p = 0.03) emerged as risk factors for PD, whereas gender, activities of daily living, frailty, atrial fibrillation, and postoperative use of opioids and anxiolytics did not. Patients treated with TAVI and without PD during the first 2 postoperative days were unlikely to experience PD on subsequent days. The onset of PD after SAVR could occur at any time during the postoperative evaluation. In conclusion, SAVR in octogenarian patients with aortic stenosis might be considered as a predisposing factor for PD. Our data also suggest that the onset of PD was more unpredictable after SAVR.
PubMed ID
25644851 View in PubMed
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[Delirium (acute confusion) among elderly patients after admission to a medical department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217304
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Sep 20;114(22):2613-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1994
Author
A. Braekhus
K. Engedal
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Sep 20;114(22):2613-5
Date
Sep-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Confusion - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Prevalence
Abstract
Delirium is a common mental disorder among the elderly. In this study we examined the prevalence of delirium among patients older than 75 years of age who had been admitted to an acute medical ward. 14 of 58 patients (24%) received a diagnosis of delirium. For these patients we recorded in all 58 factors possibly associated with its occurrence, four on average per patient. Drugs, cerebrovascular disease, and congestive heart failure were the most common factors. The large number of possibly contributing factors precludes a definite conclusion regarding precipitating factors. Mini-Mental State Examination, which is a commonly used screening-instrument for detecting cognitive impairment, was of minor value in detecting delirium.
PubMed ID
7985180 View in PubMed
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Delirium after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108459
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Nov;17(5):790-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Nina Smulter
Helena Claesson Lingehall
Yngve Gustafson
Birgitta Olofsson
Karl Gunnar Engström
Author Affiliation
Cardiothoracic Division, Department of Surgery and Perioperative Science, All Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Nov;17(5):790-6
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Delirium after cardiac surgery is a problem with consequences for patients and healthcare. Preventive strategies from known risk factors may reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. The present aim was to explore risk factors behind delirium in older patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.
Patients (=70 years) scheduled for routine cardiac surgery were included (n = 142). The patients were assessed and monitored pre-/postoperatively, and delirium was diagnosed from repeated assessments with the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Organic Brain Syndrome Scale, using the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Variables were analysed by uni-/multivariable logistic regression, including both preoperative variables (predisposing) and those extracted during surgery and in the early postoperative period (precipitating).
Delirium was diagnosed in 78 patients (54.9%). Delirium was independently associated with both predisposing and precipitating factors (P-value, odds ratio, upper/lower confidence interval): age (0.036, 1.1, 1.0/1.2), diabetes (0.032, 3.5, 1.1/11.0), gastritis/ulcer problems (0.050, 4.0, 1.0/16.1), volume load during operation (0.001, 2.8, 1.5/5.1), ventilator time in ICU (0.042, 1.2, 1.0/1.4), highest temperature recorded in ICU (0.044, 2.2, 1.0/4.8) and sodium concentration in ICU (0.038, 1.2, 1.0/1.4).
Delirium was common among older patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Both predisposing and precipitating factors contributed to delirium. When combined, the predictive strength of the model improved. Preventive strategies may be considered, in particular among the precipitating factors. Of interest, delirium was strongly associated with an increased volume load during surgery.
Notes
Comment In: Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Nov;17(5):79724150050
Comment In: Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Nov;17(5):797-824150051
Comment In: Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Nov;17(5):796-724150049
PubMed ID
23887126 View in PubMed
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Delirium and dementia in acute medical admissions of elderly patients in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221751
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Feb;87(2):123-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
H. Kolbeinsson
A. Jónsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Borgarspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Feb;87(2):123-7
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dementia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Hospitalization
Hospitals, General
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Abstract
A prospective study was carried out in a general hospital in Reykjavík to evaluate the prevalence of delirium and dementia among 331 patients 70 years and older who were admitted as an emergency to the medical department. Cognitive function was screened with Mental Status Questionnaire (MSQ) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and diagnosed according to DSM-III-R for delirium and dementia. Other information obtained included social and demographic factors, drug consumption, the main condition underlying the delirium and outcome. Severe cognitive dysfunction was present in 32% of all acutely admitted patients 70 years and older, which were diagnosed further as delirium 14% and dementia 18%. At follow-up, concurrent dementia was found in 70% of the delirium patients. The main causes for delirium were cardiac failure 27%, stroke 22% and sepsis 16% and the mortality rate was 32% compared with 8% in dementia alone. The prognosis of patients with delirium and dementia depends on detecting these disorders, and the clinical skills of physicians working with acutely ill elderly patients can be improved by relatively simple screening questionnaires such as the MSQ and MMSE.
PubMed ID
8447239 View in PubMed
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Delirium--awareness, observation and interventions in intensive care units: a national survey of Swedish ICU head nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140864
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2010 Oct;26(5):296-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Lena M Forsgren
Mats Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Lindesberg Hospital, Lindesberg, Sweden. kristina.rosengren@hhj.hj.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2010 Oct;26(5):296-303
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing - therapy
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intensive Care
Intensive Care Units
Nurses
Nursing Assessment
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To survey the awareness and observation of delirium, and interventions used for delirium in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs) and to examine the influence of hospital categories and staff education on the afore-mentioned.
A questionnaire was sent to all Swedish adult patient ICUs (n=82) and completed by 55 units.
The reported prevalence of delirium was 9.4%. Assessment of delirium was performed by 62% of the ICUs, commonly by observing symptoms. Most of the suggested non-pharmacologic interventions were reported to be used by at least 85% of the units. Drugs were used by 96%, most commonly haloperidol, propofol and benzodiazepines. Written pharmacological guidelines existed in 26% of the units, while 9% had non-pharmacological guidelines. Regular observation of delirium was more common in larger hospitals than in smaller ones and education was associated with reporting a higher prevalence of delirium.
As in other countries, this study demonstrated that the awareness of delirium in ICUs is low with a lack of implementation of validated screening tools for its diagnosis. Emphasis should be placed on education and implementation of these tools to improve the quality of care for ICU patients.
PubMed ID
20837322 View in PubMed
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Delirium in older patients admitted to general internal medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82232
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2006 Jun;19(2):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Edlund Agneta
Lundström Maria
Karlsson Stig
Brännström Benny
Bucht Gösta
Gustafson Yngve
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Rehabilitation, Piteå River Valley Hospital, Piteå, Sweden.
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2006 Jun;19(2):83-90
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Internal Medicine
Length of Stay
Male
Patient Admission
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Delirium on the day of admission to general internal medicine wards was studied in 400 consecutive patients aged 70 years and above regarding occurrence, associated factors, clinical profile, length of hospital stay, and mortality. The patients were assessed using the Organic Brain Syndrome Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination, and delirium was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed) criteria. Delirium on the day of admission occurred in 31.3% of the patients and was independently associated with old age, fever on the day of admission (> or = 38 degrees C), treatment with neuroleptics, impaired vision, male sex, and previous stroke. Delirious patients had longer hospital stay (15.4 vs 9.5 days, P
PubMed ID
16690993 View in PubMed
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Delirium in the non-demented oldest old in the general population: risk factors and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194833
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Apr;16(4):415-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
T. Rahkonen
U. Eloniemi-Sulkava
P. Halonen
A. Verkkoniemi
L. Niinistö
I L Notkola
R. Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatrics, Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. terhi.rahkonen@uku.fi
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Apr;16(4):415-21
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension
Incidence
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The oldest old are prone to develop delirium. Studies into risk factors for delirium have been carried out predominantly in younger age groups. The aim of this population-based follow-up study was to investigate the risk factors for delirium requiring medical attention and subsequent prognosis in the non-demented general population aged > or = 85 years.
The study included the non-demented subjects in the population-based Vantaa 85+ study. After the 3-year observation period, 199 subjects (91% of those surviving) were re-examined and their medical records were evaluated for episodes of delirium. The subjects were followed up with respect to mortality for another 2 years.
During the 3-year observational period, 20 subjects (10%) had been diagnosed as having had an episode of delirium. A Mini-Mental State Examination score of or = 85 years. The study also highlights the significant association between delirium and a new dementia diagnosis in this age group.
PubMed ID
11333430 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.