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250 records – page 1 of 25.

[A funny thing happened on the way to the psychiatrist's office--the physician disappeared].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145678
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Feb 1;172(5):350
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2010

An agency model for developing and coordinating psychiatric aftercare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245350
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
S J Freeman
L. Fischer
A. Sheldon
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Patient Advocacy
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
The development of coordinated systems for delivery of aftercare services to psychiatric patients has lagged far behind the theoretical emphasis on community maintenance. From a collaboration of 29 treatment and rehabilitation facilities, an independent agency was established to improve aftercare services in Metropolitan Toronto. Known as Community Resources Consultants, the agency was designed to facilitate and rationalize the use of existing services, to identify gaps in service, to initiate or cooperate in the development of new services, and to involve hospital and community service personnel in raising the level of expertise in the provision of aftercare. Formal and informal assessments indicate that CRC has had a positive effect on the provision of aftercare services and on professionals' level of awareness of aftercare priorities.
PubMed ID
6253385 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):146-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
D S Kim
Author Affiliation
Ethelyn R. Strong School of Social Work, Norfolk State University, VA 23504, USA. dskim@nsu.edu
Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):146-8
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Deinstitutionalization
Group Homes
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):127-3810845147
PubMed ID
10845149 View in PubMed
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[A rehabilitation project for patients with schizophrenia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219592
Source
Duodecim. 1994;110(15):1452-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

Assessing the "criminalization" of the mentally ill in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222998
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Oct;37(8):532-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
S. Davis
Author Affiliation
School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Oct;37(8):532-8
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Deinstitutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Homeless Persons - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Insanity Defense
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
United States
Abstract
This paper is an overview of the conceptual and methodological problems encountered trying to assess the hypothesis that the mentally ill, as a consequence of deinstitutionalization, are being "criminalized". Generalizations are difficult to make, in large part because most of the studies are American and do not fit well into the Canadian scene. Relevant Canadian findings are reviewed and compared to the US data. There is some evidence that Canadian patients may be diverted from the criminal justice system more often than in the US, where there are fewer resources. However, this conclusion must be tempered by the fact that Canadian surveys have found high rates of mental disorder among prison and jail inmates.
PubMed ID
1423153 View in PubMed
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The attitudes of Canadian police officers toward the mentally ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180778
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(2):135-46
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dorothy Cotton
Author Affiliation
Regional Treatment Centre (Ontario), Correctional Service Canada, 555 King Street West, P.O. Box 22, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 4V7.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(2):135-46
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Canada
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Deinstitutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Mental disorders
Middle Aged
Police
PubMed ID
15063638 View in PubMed
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The Barents project in psychiatry: a systematic comparative mental health services study between Northern Norway and Archangelsk County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166140
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;42(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Grigory Rezvyy
Terje Oiesvold
Alexander Parniakov
Oleg Ponomarev
Olga Lazurko
Reidun Olstad
Author Affiliation
Nordland Hospital, Kløveråsveien 1, 8002, Bodø, Norway. grigory.rezvy@nlsh.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;42(2):131-9
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Deinstitutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
There is virtually no readily accessible systematically recorded evidence on how the organization of mental health services in Europe's largest country, Russia, may differ from other national systems. This study systematically compares the mental health services in Archangelsk County and Northern Norway using instruments developed for trans-cultural use.
The European Service Mapping Schedule (ESMS) and The International Classification of Mental Health Care (ICMHC) were used to describe: (i) resources, organisation and utilisation of the services; (ii) their decentralisation and differentiation; (iii) some interventions delivered by the mental health service units (n = 132) in both regions.
The Norwegian services are more decentralised and differentiated, while the Russian services are largely hospital-based. The GPs are of considerable importance to the Norwegian services, functioning as gatekeepers-both centrally and peripherally. In contrast, the GP model is still poorly established in Archangelsk County. There are more units for long term stay in the Russian services than in Norway. General health care and taking over daily living activities are more organised in Archangelsk County, while psychopharmacological treatment and psychosocial interventions are more developed in Norway.
The study has revealed several differences in resources, organisation and utilisation of the mental health services between the two compared areas. The very large variations indicate that underlying local patterns of service delivering must be further investigated and taken into account in the planning of the services development.
PubMed ID
17160593 View in PubMed
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Being a psychiatric patient in the community--reclassified as the stigmatized "other".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192014
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J. Thesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Janecke.Thesen@isf.uib.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):248-55
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - education
Community Mental Health Services - manpower - standards
Deinstitutionalization
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Loneliness
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Norway
Prejudice
Professional-Patient Relations
Rural Population
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Stereotyping
Abstract
To explore the experiences of psychiatric patients living in six rural communities in Norway from a primary care perspective.
A "Knowledge workshop" (KW) was designed. It was a special kind of meeting between users of services for people with mental illness and service providers. The process and outcome were documented on flipcharts and audiotape and analysed by a qualitative method.
A main statement was constructed in order to capture the essence of meaning in the 10 main themes identified in the analysis. The statement is mainly about the process and state of being reclassified as a stigmatized "other", with serious consequences for both self-esteem and public esteem. The consequences include isolation and loneliness, low self-esteem, no paid work, lack of money, discrimination, and harassment. Other consequences include altered behaviour from others, lack of necessary conditions for empowerment, and the danger of becoming visible as mentally ill. Attitudinal change is called for.
Although the stigma of mental illness is a wellknown and much discussed fact, it has so far not really been included in the professional knowledge base. It is still practically absent from discussions of quality of care. In order for services to be relevant to people who need them, professionals can no longer ignore issues that are of major importance for users. Stigma must thus be included in the conceptual thinking about serving people with mental illness. The inclusion of stigma as an issue for quality of care could be a fruitful way forward.
PubMed ID
11775780 View in PubMed
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Burger King, Dunkin Donuts and community mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197579
Source
Health Place. 2000 Sep;6(3):213-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
C. Knowles
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK.
Source
Health Place. 2000 Sep;6(3):213-24
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Quebec
Restaurants
Abstract
This paper describes the patchwork of cottage industries and human warehousing composing Montréal's 'community mental health care' system. It examines the ways in which this system's clients assemble a collage of ad hoc facilities including homeless shelters, rooming houses, food banks and soup kitchens through which they pursue the fragmented task of daily survival. In their various forms of transit around the city, released psychiatric patients, who rotate in and out of the local psychiatric wards, construe the grammar of urban space. In examining their use of key city sites - malls, fast food outlets, churches and the streets - it becomes apparent that the 'mad' have a particular relationship to these places which they pass through and use on certain terms. Examining the nature of their journeys, the scenes on which they are set and the social relationships of space in play, it is evident that the 'mad' have a particular (dialogical) relationship to the city: a relationship which they share with other, multiply disenfranchised people. This raises significant social questions concerning the politics of city space, and the kinds of fragmented lives and forms of subjectivity that they produce.
PubMed ID
10936776 View in PubMed
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[Caregivers lack influence in psychiatry plan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232920
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Jun 15;88(24):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1988
Author
M. Ellegaard
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Jun 15;88(24):26-9
Date
Jun-15-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Denmark
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
PubMed ID
3420543 View in PubMed
Less detail

250 records – page 1 of 25.