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214 records – page 1 of 22.

[2011 peaks the TBE incidence. The deer tribe variation in size and the weather are key factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124516
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Thomas G T Jaenson
Marika Hjertqvist
Ake Lundkvist
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för organismbiologi, Uppsala universitet. thomas.jaenson@ebc.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Deer - parasitology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Ixodes - growth & development - parasitology
Risk factors
Rodentia - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22574428 View in PubMed
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Accidents in the north. Some aspects on snowmobile accidents and moose-car collisions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11946
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:56-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
U. Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:56-8
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Deer
Humans
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Snowmobile accidents and moose-car crashes are typical accidents in Northern Sweden. In this region there is about 1 snowmobile/10 inhabitants. The present paper combines previously published studies. The studies on snowmobile accidents are based on a material comprising all 61 fatally injured snowmobile drivers from the four northern counties of Sweden during the period 1973-1987. The helmet usage was analyzed in two clinical study populations including 200 injured from the county of Västerbotten from two periods 1979-1980 and 1985-86. Of the fatally injured (median age 32 years) 86% were driving under the influence of alcohol with a mean blood alcohol concentration of 0.17 g/ml. Serious head injuries were uncommon among persons driving without a helmet in the clinical material. Only in about 6% of the cases an open face helmet would probably have had an injury reducing effect. Drunken driving is an important etiological factor for fatal snowmobile accidents. Preventive measures must include information that the Traffic Temperance Law also applies to snowmobile riding. A helmet law for snowmobile riders does not seem to be motivated from the injury reduction point of view. According to official Swedish police statistics more than 400 car occupants are injured annually in crashes with a moose. The crash mechanism is special. Because of its long legs the body of the moose hits directly against the windshield, windshield pillars and front roof. During a period of three years 154 injured passenger car occupants were treated in the hospitals in Umeå and Skellefteå. Of both the front and rear seat occupants 80% suffered laceration injuries from glass or glass splinters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1285819 View in PubMed
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Adopting control principles in a novel setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83051
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2006 Feb 25;112(2-4):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2006
Author
Wahlström Helene
Englund Lena
Author Affiliation
Department of Disease Control and Biosecurity, Zoonosis Center, National Veterinary Institute, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden. helene.wahlstrom@sva.se
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2006 Feb 25;112(2-4):265-71
Date
Feb-25-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - standards
Animals
Cattle
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Deer
Meat - microbiology
Mycobacterium bovis - isolation & purification
Population Surveillance - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculin Test - veterinary
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Abstract
The paper describes the introduction of Mycobacterium bovis into Swedish deer herds and its possible consequences. The different control strategies applied are summarized as well as their shortcomings under the conditions of the Swedish outbreak. An alternative control, to be used in extensive deer herds, based only on slaughter and meat inspection is described. Finally, the efficiency of the implemented control and surveillance systems are discussed and possible improvements suggested.
PubMed ID
16325356 View in PubMed
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Age, size, and spatiotemporal variation in ovulation patterns of a seasonal breeder, the Norwegian moose (Alces alces).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90869
Source
Am Nat. 2009 Jan;173(1):89-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Garel Mathieu
Solberg Erling Johan
Saether Bernt-Erik
Grøtan Vidar
Tufto Jarle
Heim Morten
Author Affiliation
Université de Lyon, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, Villeurbanne F-69622, France. mgarel@biomserv.univ-lyon1.fr.
Source
Am Nat. 2009 Jan;173(1):89-104
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Size
Deer - physiology
Female
Geography
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Norway
Ovulation
Seasons
Abstract
In seasonal environments, timing of reproduction is an important fitness component. However, in ungulates, our understanding of this biological process is limited. Here we analyze how age and body mass affect spatiotemporal variation in timing of ovulation of 6,178 Norwegian moose. We introduced a parametric statistical model to obtain inferences about the seasonal timing of ovulation peak, the degree of synchrony among individuals, and the proportion of individuals that ovulate. These components showed much more spatiotemporal variation than previously reported. Young (primiparous) and old (> or =11.5 years of age) females ovulated later than prime-aged (2.5-10.5 years of age) females. In all age classes, ovulation was delayed with decreasing body mass. Ovulation rates were lower and more variable among primiparous females than among older females. Young females required higher body mass than older females did to ovulate. The body-mass-to-ovulation relationship varied with age, showed large regional variation, and differed among years within region. These results suggest that (1) environmental and population characteristics contribute to shape seasonal variation in the breeding pattern and (2) large regional variation exists in the size-dependent age at maturity in moose. Hence, the life-history trade-off between reproduction and body growth should differ regionally in moose.
PubMed ID
19072136 View in PubMed
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An Early archaeological example of tattooing from northwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2572
Source
Fieldiana: Anthropology. 66(1):1-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
VanStone, J.W.
Lucier, C.V.
Author Affiliation
Field Museum (Chicago)
Source
Fieldiana: Anthropology. 66(1):1-9.
Date
1974
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Deering
Tattoos
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 215.
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An exploratory study of total mercury levels in archaeological caribou hair from northwest Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99504
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Dec;65(11):1909-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Gerlach, SC
Duffy, LK
Murray, MS
Bowers, PM
Adams, R
Verbrugge, DA
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Northern Land Use Research Inc., Fairbanks, AK
State of Alaska Public Health Lab, Anchorage, AK
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Dec;65(11):1909-14
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Archaeofauna
Beringia
Caribou
Deering
Hair
Mercury
Rangifer
Abstract
Over the past ten years, total mercury (THg) levels have been surveyed in Alaskan wildlife and fish as part of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment (AMAP). Beyond these studies there is little historical data on THg levels in important subsistence species for people in Alaska. A survey of THg in caribou hair from archaeological deposits would provide data to develop temporal trends for this region of the Arctic. Caribou hair from a Western Thule settlement beneath the Alaska native village of Deering (ca. AD 1150) show variability in hair THg values, with a mean level (86 ng/g) which is in the range that is observed in modern Rangifer sp. (caribou and reindeer). Hair from House 1 had a THg mean level of 99.6 ng/g and hair from House 2 had a THg mean of 64.2 ng/g. This is the earliest reported record of mercury in caribou associated with human subsistence activities in the western North American Arctic, and is a first step toward compilation of a needed database through which to measure and evaluate exposure to mercury by people who rely heavily on caribou as a food source. We hypothesize that similarity in mercury values in archaeological samples of caribou and in contemporary samples would give an additional perspective on human exposure to mercury through caribou harvest and consumption today. Since this hypothesis will be more useful if evaluated at a regional rather than global scale, further studies will be needed at different archaeological sites across Alaska to determine the generality of this observation in relation to geographic scale.
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Anti-Brucella Antibodies in Moose (Alces alces gigas), Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and Plains Bison (Bison bison bison) in Alaska, USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277206
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jan;52(1):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Ingebjørg Helena Nymo
Kimberlee Beckmen
Jacques Godfroid
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jan;52(1):96-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Animals, Wild
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bison
Brucella - immunology
Brucellosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Deer
Female
Male
Prevalence
Ruminants
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We used an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the rose bengal test (RBT) to test for anti-Brucella antibodies in moose (Alces alces gigas), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and plains bison (Bison bison bison) from various game management units (GMUs) in Alaska, US, sampled from 1982 to 2010. A portion of the sera had previously been tested with the standard plate test (SPT), the buffered Brucella antigen (BBA) card test, and the card test (CARD). No antibody-positive plains bison were identified. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in moose (iELISA, n=4/87; RBT, n=4/87; SPT, n=4/5; BBA, n=4/4) from GMU 23 captured in 1992, 1993, and 1995 and in muskoxen (iELISA, n=4/52; RBT, n=4/52; CARD, n=4/35) from GMUs 26A and 26B captured in 2004, 2006, and 2007. A negative effect of infection on the health of individuals of these species is probable. The presence of antibody-positive animals from 1992 to 2007 suggests presence of brucellae over time. The antibody-positive animals were found in northern Alaska, an area with a historically higher prevalence of Brucella-positive caribou, and a spillover of Brucella suis biovar 4 from caribou may have occurred. Brucella suis biovar 4 causes human brucellosis, and transmission from consumption of moose and muskoxen is possible.
PubMed ID
26540335 View in PubMed
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Antler size provides an honest signal of male phenotypic quality in roe deer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78933
Source
Am Nat. 2007 Apr;169(4):481-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Vanpé Cécile
Gaillard Jean-Michel
Kjellander Petter
Mysterud Atle
Magnien Pauline
Delorme Daniel
Van Laere Guy
Klein François
Liberg Olof
Hewison A J Mark
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire Comportement et Ecologie de la Faune Sauvage, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, BP 52627, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France. cecile.vanpe@toulouse.inra.fr
Source
Am Nat. 2007 Apr;169(4):481-93
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Antlers - growth & development
Body Weights and Measures
Climate
Deer - growth & development
Ecosystem
France
Male
Models, Biological
Phenotype
Population Density
Selection (Genetics)
Sexual Behavior, Animal - physiology
Sweden
Territoriality
Abstract
Identifying factors shaping secondary sexual traits is essential in understanding how their variation may influence male fitness. Little information is available on the allocation of resources to antler growth in territorial ungulates with low sexual size dimorphism. We investigated phenotypic and environmental factors affecting both absolute and relative antler size of male roe deer in three contrasting populations in France and Sweden. In the three populations, we found marked age-specific variation in antler size, with an increase in both absolute and relative antler size between yearling and prime-age stages, followed by a decrease (senescence) for males older than 7 years. Antler size increased allometrically with body mass. This increase was particularly strong for senescent males, suggesting the evolution of two reproductive tactics: heavy old males invested particularly heavily in antler growth (potentially remaining competitive for territories), whereas light old males grew small antlers (potentially abandoning territory defense). Finally, environmental conditions had little effect on antler size: only population density negatively affected absolute antler size in one of the three populations. Antler size may therefore provide an honest signal of male phenotypic quality in roe deer. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of territory tenure and mating competition.
PubMed ID
17273980 View in PubMed
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Are migrant and resident elk (Cervus elaphus) exposed to similar forage and predation risk on their sympatric winter range?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144394
Source
Oecologia. 2010 Sep;164(1):265-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Barry G Robinson
Mark Hebblewhite
Evelyn H Merrill
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada. bgrobins@ualberta.ca
Source
Oecologia. 2010 Sep;164(1):265-75
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animal Migration
Animals
Deer - psychology
Ecosystem
Humans
Predatory Behavior
Seasons
Wolves - psychology
Abstract
Partially migratory populations, where one portion of a population conducts seasonal migrations (migrants) while the other remains on a single range (residents), are common in ungulates. Studies that assess trade-offs between migratory strategies typically compare the amount of predation risk and forage resources migrants and residents are exposed to only while on separate ranges and assume both groups intermix completely while on sympatric ranges. Here we provide one of the first tests of this assumption by comparing the amount of overlap between home ranges of GPS-collared migrant and resident elk and fine-scale exposure to wolf predation risk and forage biomass at telemetry locations on a sympatric winter range in west-central Alberta, Canada. Overlap between migrant and resident home ranges increased throughout the winter, and both groups were generally intermixed and exposed to equal forage biomass. During the day, both migrants and residents avoided predation risk by remaining in areas far from timber with high human activity, which wolves avoided. However, at night wolves moved onto the grasslands close to humans and away from timber. Resident elk were consistently closer to areas of human activity and further from timber than migrants, possibly because of a habituation to humans. As a result, resident elk were exposed to higher night-time predation risk than migrants. Our study does not support the assumption that migrant and resident elk are exposed to equal predation risk on their sympatric range when human presence alters predation risk dynamics and habituation to humans is unequal between migratory strategies.
PubMed ID
20372929 View in PubMed
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Avoidance of roads and selection for recent cutovers by threatened caribou: fitness-rewarding or maladaptive behaviour?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120962
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Nov 7;279(1746):4481-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2012
Author
Christian Dussault
Véronique Pinard
Jean-Pierre Ouellet
Réhaume Courtois
Daniel Fortin
Author Affiliation
Ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune du Québec, Direction générale de l'expertise sur la faune et ses habitats, 880 chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC, Canada.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Nov 7;279(1746):4481-8
Date
Nov-7-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Deer - growth & development - physiology
Environment
Female
Food chain
Genetic Fitness
Geographic Information Systems
Human Activities
Humans
Population Dynamics
Quebec
Remote Sensing Technology
Seasons
Abstract
The impact of anthropogenic disturbance on the fitness of prey should depend on the relative effect of human activities on different trophic levels. This verification remains rare, however, especially for large animals. We investigated the functional link between habitat selection of female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and the survival of their calves, a fitness correlate. This top-down controlled population of the threatened forest-dwelling caribou inhabits a managed forest occupied by wolves (Canis lupus) and black bears (Ursus americanus). Sixty-one per cent of calves died from bear predation within two months following their birth. Variation in habitat selection tactics among mothers resulted in different mortality risks for their calves. When calves occupied areas with few deciduous trees, they were more likely to die from predation if the local road density was high. Although caribou are typically associated with pristine forests, females selected recent cutovers without negative impact on calf survival. This selection became detrimental, however, as regeneration took place in harvested stands owing to increased bear predation. We demonstrate that human disturbance has asymmetrical consequences on the trophic levels of a food web involving multiple large mammals, which resulted in habitat selection tactics with a greater short-term fitness payoff and, therefore, with higher evolutionary opportunity.
Notes
Cites: Oecologia. 2005 Jun;144(2):257-6715891849
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2006 Jun 22;273(1593):1449-5416777736
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2006 Jul;75(4):887-9817009752
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e2570321984940
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(5):e551119436725
Cites: Ecology. 2009 Dec;90(12):3445-5420120812
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2010 Jan;79(1):4-1219732211
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2007 May;76(3):568-7917439473
PubMed ID
22951736 View in PubMed
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214 records – page 1 of 22.