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2851 records – page 1 of 286.

[A dynamic expert system for making organizational decisions in eliminating the aftereffects of disasters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222953
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Oct;(10):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Sep 20;66(14):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1979
Author
A. Blankholm
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Sep 20;66(14):5
Date
Sep-20-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Humans
Norway
Nursing Services
PubMed ID
258898 View in PubMed
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The effect of professional identity on comprehensiveness in strategic decision making: physician executives in the Canadian health care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117834
Source
Adv Health Care Manag. 2012;13:95-121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Shazia Karmali
Author Affiliation
Gustavson School of Business, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Adv Health Care Manag. 2012;13:95-121
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Decision Making
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Services Research
Humans
Physician Executives - psychology
Professional Role
Social Identification
Socialization
Abstract
This paper explores differences in decision-making approaches between physician executives and nonphysician executives in a managerial setting.
Fredrickson and Mitchell's (1984) conceptualization of the construct of comprehensiveness in strategic decision making is the central construct of this paper. Theories of professional identity, socialization, and institutional/dominant logics are applied to illustrate their impact on strategic decision-making approaches of physician and nonphysician executives.
This paper proposes that high-status professionals, specifically physicians, occupying senior management roles are likely to approach decision making in a way that is consistent with their professional identity, and by extension, that departments led by physician executives are less likely to exhibit comprehensiveness in strategic decision-making processes than departments led by nonphysician executives.
This paper provides conceptual evidence that physicians and nonphysicians approach management differently, and introduces the utility of comprehensiveness as a construct for strategic decision making in the context of health care management.
PubMed ID
23265068 View in PubMed
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Influential factors for sun policy implementation in Danish kindergartens

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101210
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(5):479-483
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Rezai, L
Thorgaard, C
Philip, A
Author Affiliation
Department of Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(5):479-483
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Denmark
Kindergarten
Qualitative
Sun policy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2007, the Danish Cancer Society and the Tryg Fonden launched a campaign to prevent skin cancer and melanoma. As a part of this intervention program, the Danish Cancer Society prepared a "sun policy," which recommends how children in Danish kindergartens can be protected from the sun. AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine the factors that influence a decision to implement the sun policy in Danish kindergartens. METHODS: We conducted a comparative qualitative study. Data were collected at semi-structured interviews with the principals of five kindergartens with a sun policy and five without. RESULTS: The key factor in making a decision is the priority given to the sun policy by the principal, which in turn depends on the principal's perception of his or her resources. Further factors are the principal's attitude toward parental responsibility and media focus on sun protection. CONCLUSIONS: Principals must be convinced of the importance of a written sun policy. A mailed reminder containing arguments about its importance to accompany the draft sun policy might reinforce the formulation and implementation of sun policies nationwide.
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Risk assessment and the setting of priorities in occupational health and safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244875
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981;7 Suppl 4:84-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
J. Rantanen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981;7 Suppl 4:84-90
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Finland
Humans
Occupational Medicine
Risk
Abstract
Risk management is a concept central to present-day occupational health and safety. Decisions concerning the regulations of risks are based on the results of risk assessment. To date, no systematic approach to the assessment and management of risk has been developed. The issue is a difficult one because it involves combining scientific analyses with societal and political decision making. It is crucial that that risk assessor and risk manager identify the model according to which risk is regulated in his particular society. This review presents the consecutive steps used to assess risks. Also described is the linking of the assessed risks to the setting of priorities in decisions of risk management.
PubMed ID
7330635 View in PubMed
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What do Canadian MDs think about euthanasia? An update following the CMA annual meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218970
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Feb 1;150(3):395-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1-1994
Author
D M Sawyer
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Feb 1;150(3):395-7
Date
Feb-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Humans
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1993 May 8;341(8854):1196-98098087
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1921-68500029
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Sep 14;338(8768):669-741715962
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Feb 15;304(6824):434-61547394
Comment In: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):2678039071
PubMed ID
7904894 View in PubMed
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Validity and reliability testing of the Swedish version of Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264344
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ulf Isaksson
Senada Hajdarevic
Lena Jutterström
Åsa Hörnsten
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):405-12
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) is an attempt to capture and measure coping strategies that people use. The instrument had not previously been translated into Swedish. The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the MDMQ.
A Swedish translation was performed and back-translated. A group of five pilot readers evaluated content validity. The translated questionnaire was tested among 735 patients, healthcare workers, healthcare students and teachers. A parallel analysis (PA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed.
An initial EFA with a four-factor solution showed a low concordance with the original 22-item four-factor model with a very low Cronbach's alpha in one of the dimensions. However, a second EFA with a three-factor solution showed a good model fit for the Swedish translation of the Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ-S) with a satisfactory Cronbach's alpha. A CFA showed a goodness of fit after deleting six items.
After testing the MDMQ-S, we found support for validity and reliability of the instrument. We found the 16-item version of MDMQ-S to be satisfactory concerning the subscales vigilance, procrastination and buck-passing. However, we found no support that the hypervigilance dimension could be measured by the MDMQ-S.
PubMed ID
23647465 View in PubMed
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[Time for national guidelines on do-not-resuscitate decisions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194917
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Mar 21;98(12):1428
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2001
Author
H. Friberg
D. Lundberg
T. Nilstun
Author Affiliation
Universitetssjukhuset, Lund. hans.friberg@expbr.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Mar 21;98(12):1428
Date
Mar-21-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Decision Making
Humans
Resuscitation Orders
Sweden
PubMed ID
11320793 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Mar 28;87(13):1031-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-1990
Author
G. Dahl
S. Sunesson
S O Isacsson
L. Janzon
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Mar 28;87(13):1031-2
Date
Mar-28-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Health Policy
Humans
Mortality
Registries
Sweden
PubMed ID
2319855 View in PubMed
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Life-terminating acts without explicit request of patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220855
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jun 19;341(8860):1598-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1993
Author
R. Førde
K W Ruyter
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jun 19;341(8860):1598-9
Date
Jun-19-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Denmark
Euthanasia
Humans
Patient Participation
Physicians
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1993 May 8;341(8854):1196-98098087
PubMed ID
8099673 View in PubMed
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2851 records – page 1 of 286.