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Characterization of the dominant bacterial communities during storage of Norway lobster and Norway lobster tails (Nephrops norvegicus) based on 16S rDNA analysis by PCR-DGGE.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264589
Source
Food Microbiol. 2015 Apr;46:132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Karen Bekaert
Lisa Devriese
Sara Maes
Johan Robbens
Source
Food Microbiol. 2015 Apr;46:132-8
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - genetics
Decapoda (Crustacea) - microbiology
Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
Food Storage
Microbiota
Norway
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Shellfish - microbiology
Tail - microbiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial quality of whole Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and Norway lobster tails to optimize handling conditions. This was done by assessing the total viable count (TVC) and characterizing the dominant microbiota. The cultivable microorganisms were quantified via classical microbiological plating methods. To characterize as many bacterial species present as possible, we performed advanced molecular identification techniques (PCR-DGGE). The initial TVC of fresh Norway lobster meat was high (3.0 log cfu/g) as compared to fish. No significant difference between whole Norway lobster and Norway lobster tails could be found during the storage period. From day 6 of storage, a significant difference between Plate Count Agar (PCA) and Marine Agar (MA) was observed. The microbiota of Norway lobster was dominated by members of the Gram-negative genera such as Psychrobacter spp., Pseudoalteromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Luteimonas spp., and Aliivibrio spp. From these bacteria, mainly Psychrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. remained present until the end of the storage period. These are known spoilage organisms in fishery products. Other known spoilage organisms of crustaceans such as Photobacterium spp. could not be identified.
PubMed ID
25475276 View in PubMed
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[Isolation of halophilic vibrios from humans and the environment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75664
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1980 Jun;(6):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1980
Author
V A Shikulov
A B Khaitovich
L M Bogatyreva
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1980 Jun;(6):38-40
Date
Jun-1980
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agglutination Tests
Animals
Bivalvia - microbiology
Decapoda (Crustacea) - microbiology
Dysentery - microbiology
English Abstract
Enteritis - microbiology
Fishes - microbiology
Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Gastroenteritis - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Ukraine
Vibrio - isolation & purification
Vibrio Infections - epidemiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Both biotypes of halophilous vibrios, V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus, have been found to cause intestinal diseases among the inhabitants of the littoral localities of the Crimea. These diseases mostly assume the form of acute gastroenteritis and alimentary toxic infections. Most frequently people contact infection by using sea food. It is suggested that the etiological unraveling of intestinal infections may be improved by introducing the method for the isolation of halophilous vibrios into laboratory practice.
PubMed ID
7192466 View in PubMed
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Sample preparation and DNA extraction procedures for polymerase chain reaction identification of Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11066
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1997
Author
A. Agersborg
R. Dahl
I. Martinez
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture N-9005 Tromso, Norway.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):275-80
Date
Apr-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - chemistry - genetics
Decapoda (Crustacea) - microbiology
Detergents - pharmacology
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
Endopeptidase K - pharmacology
Fish Products - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Gene Amplification
Heat
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Muramidase - pharmacology
Norway - epidemiology
Octoxynol - pharmacology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Abstract
Five grams of seafood products were inoculated with one to 500 viable or 10(9) heat-killed cells of Listeria monocytogenes. The presence of the pathogen was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers specific for fragments of the listeriolysin O (hly) gene (two sets) and for the invasion-associated protein (iap) gene (one set). For DNA preparation, boiling, either alone or in combination with lysozyme and proteinase K treatment, was not always sufficient to lyse L. monocytogenes, while treatment with Triton X-100 produced consistently good DNA suitable for amplification. To avoid false-negative and false-positive results, 48 h incubations were necessary and a subculturing step after an initial 24 h incubation greatly improved the results. The primers that amplified regions of the listeriolysin O gene gave clearer and stronger products than primers for the invasion-associated protein gene. Using this method we were able to detect one to five L. monocytogenes cells in 5 g of product in a total of 55 h.
PubMed ID
9105938 View in PubMed
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