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The -1C to T polymorphism in the annexin A5 gene is not associated with the risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death in middle-aged Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53135
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
K S Kaikkonen
S. Kakko
M L Kortelainen
J M Tapanainen
M J Savolainen
Y. Antero Kesäniemi
H V Huikuri
E R Savolainen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5' Untranslated Regions - genetics
Adult
Aged
Annexin A5 - genetics
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A common polymorphism (-1C to T) in the translation initiation sequence of annexin A5 (ANV) gene has recently been associated with a decreased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between the ANV genepolymorphism and the risk of AMI and ischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged Finnish males. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study involving three distinct groups of subjects was carried out: (1) victims of SCD (n=98), (2) survivors of AMI (n=212), and (3) randomly selected control subjects without any history of coronary heart disease (n=243). The ANV polymorphism was genotyped in each study group. RESULTS: Among the control group of healthy Finnish males the prevalence rates of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 83.1%, 15.2%, and 1.6%, respectively. Among the survivors of AMI, the prevalence rates of CC, CT, and TT were 79.7%, 20.3%, and 0%, respectively, and among the victims of SCD 83.7%, 16.3%, and 0%, respectively. No significant differences in the genotype or allele distributions were observed between the study groups. CONCLUSION: The -1C to T polymorphism in the ANV gene is not associated with the risk of AMI or SCD in middle-aged Finnish males.
PubMed ID
16025836 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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Abuse of alcohol in sudden out-of-hospital deaths in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218488
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Perola
E. Vuori
A. Penttilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Alcoholism is known to be greatly underdiagnosed in death certificates, a fact that biases in estimates of alcohol-related mortality. An autopsy series of 1658 cases (920 with natural cause of death and 738 nonnatural) was reviewed to evaluate the extent of this bias, and also to see how well different sources of information served as indicators of alcoholism when alcohol-related disease diagnosed at autopsy was considered as a gold standard. A stepwise logistic regression model adjusted by age and sex showed police reports of individual's alcohol usage and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of > 2.9/1000 at autopsy to be the two most significant predictors of chronic alcohol abuse (p 2.9/1000), due to its high specificity, as particularly suggestive of chronic heavy drinking. However, it is wise to use these parameters only as an aid in decision-making, not as sole indicators of alcoholism. Deaths associated with chronic heavy drinking were frequent, 50.5% of the total series (male 56.4%, female 37.1%). For all but one age-group (male 45-64 years), however, death certificates mentioned alcohol-related diseases in less than half of these cases. Especially evident underdiagnosis was found for female and males 65 years and older. These results indicate that alcoholism is frequent in such a highly selected population as a series of forensic autopsies and suggest that estimates of prevalence of alcoholism based only on review of death certificates are to be considered with great caution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8048723 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction occurrence: environmental links - Baku 2003-2005 data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162231
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Elyiahu Stoupel
Elchin Babayev
Elchin Babyev
Fazil Mustafa
Evgeny Abramson
Peter Israelevich
Jaquelin Sulkes
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Azerbaijan
Cosmic Radiation
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Electromagnetic fields
Finland
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Neutrons
Radiation
Russia
Solar Activity
United States
Abstract
Despite substantial progress in modern preventive and clinical cardiology, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a central acute cardiac event. The aim of this study was to check the basic daily environmental-physical conditions accompanying the occurrence of AMIs in a specific geographic area: Baku, Azerbaijan.
AMIs registered in the Baku area by 21 first-aid stations (n=4919) during 2003-2005 were compared with daily geomagnetic activity (GMA) levels (I(0)-IV(0)) and cosmic ray activity (CRA), described by neutron (imp/min) and solar activity. The same comparison was made for pre-admission fatal AMIs (n=440). The cosmophysical data came from space science centers in the USA, Russia, and Finland.
AMI morbidity followed a daily distribution according to GMA, mostly on quiet (I(0)) GMA days. A monthly comparison showed inverse relationships with solar activity and GMA and correlation with CRA. The daily clinical parameters of AMI correlated with CRA. Despite the daily rise in AMI mortality on days with the highest GMA, the days with the lowest GMA and higher CRA were predominant for AMI occurrence and pre-admission mortality. One of the possible predisposing factors can be life-threatening arrhythmia.
The monthly number of AMIs was inversely related to monthly solar activity and correlated with CRA-neutron activity. Pre-admission AMI mortality was inversely linked with GMA. Daily AMI pre-admission mortality rose with concomitant GMA; low-GMA and higher-neutron-activity AMIs occurred much more frequently and were more strongly related to the number of fatal pre-admission AMIs. The clinical course of AMI was linked with CRA level.
Notes
Erratum In: Med Sci Monit. 2007 Oct;13(10):LE16Babyev, Elchin [corrected to Babayev, Elchin]
PubMed ID
17660721 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent association between hepatic lipase gene C-480T polymorphism and the risk of pre-hospital sudden cardiac death: the Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168688
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2007 Jun;192(2):421-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Yue-Mei Fan
Terho Lehtimäki
Riikka Rontu
Erkki Ilveskoski
Sirkka Goebeler
Olli Kajander
Jussi Mikkelsson
Markus Perola
Pekka J Karhunen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Atherosclerosis Genetics, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. loyufa@uta.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2007 Jun;192(2):421-7
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Autopsy
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lipase - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Abstract
We investigated the association between hepatic lipase (HL) C-480T polymorphism and the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as well as pre-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD).
Seven hundred sudden or unnatural pre-hospital deaths of middle-aged (33-70 years, mean 53 years) Caucasian Finnish men were subjected to detailed autopsy (Helsinki Sudden Death Study). Genotype data were obtained for 682 men.
In logistic regression analysis with age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, smoking and alcohol consumption as covariates, men with the TT genotype had an increased risk for SCD and AMI compared to CC carriers (OR=3.0, P=0.011; and OR=3.7, P=0.003). There was a significant age-by-genotype interaction (P or =50%) than men with the CT or CC genotype (P=0.019).
The results suggest that HL C-480T polymorphism is a strong age-dependent risk factor of SCD in early middle-aged men.
PubMed ID
16793047 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent interaction of apolipoprotein E gene with eastern birthplace in Finland affects severity of coronary atherosclerosis and risk of fatal myocardial infarction--Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119352
Source
Ann Med. 2013 May;45(3):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Petri Tyynelä
Sirkka Goebeler
Erkki Ilveskoski
Jussi Mikkelsson
Markus Perola
Terho Lehtimäki
Pekka J Karhunen
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. petri.tyynela@uta.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2013 May;45(3):213-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality
Plaque, Atherosclerotic - pathology
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) has been constantly higher in eastern late settlement regions compared to western early settlements in Finland, unrelated to classical risk factors. In line with this, eastern birthplace was an age-dependent predictor of severe coronary atherosclerosis and pre-hospital sudden coronary death among male residents of Helsinki. We investigated a possible interaction of apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene with birthplace on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary atherosclerosis.
APOE genotypes were analyzed in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study series comprising out-of-hospital deaths among males aged 33-70 years (n = 577), who were born in high (east, n = 273) or low (west, n = 304) CHD mortality area.
Eastern-born men = 55 years carried 30% more often (P = 0.017) and older men 40% less often (P = 0.022) the APOE ?4 allele compared to western-born men (P = 0.003 for birthplace-by-age interaction). In multivariate analysis, the ?4 allele associated with the risk of out-of-hospital MI (odds ratio 2.58; 95% CI 1.20-5.55; P = 0.016) only in eastern-born men and with advanced atherosclerosis in both regions of origin, respectively.
Birthplace-bound risk of CHD was age-dependently modified by APOE ?4 allele, suggesting genetic differences in CHD susceptibility between early and late settlement regions in Finland and providing one explanation for the eastern high mortality.
PubMed ID
23110590 View in PubMed
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Alcohol septal ablation in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: low incidence of sudden cardiac death and reduced risk profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114146
Source
Heart. 2013 Jul;99(14):1012-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Morten K Jensen
Christian Prinz
Dieter Horstkotte
Frank van Buuren
Thomas Bitter
Lothar Faber
Henning Bundgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mortenjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Heart. 2013 Jul;99(14):1012-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ablation Techniques - methods
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic - complications - mortality - surgery
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Ethanol - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Septum
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Solvents - therapeutic use
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The infarction induced by alcohol septal ablation (ASA) may predispose to arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD).
To assess survival, incidence of SCD after ASA and effects of ASA on the traditional risk factors (RFs) for SCD.
An observational cohort-study (follow-up 8.4±4 years).
A dual-centre cohort.
470 consecutive patients (age 56±14 years) with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (1996-2010).
Clinically applied echo-contrast-guided ASA treatments.
All-cause mortality, SCD and RFs for SCD before and after ASA.
The 10-year survival was 88% (annual all-cause death rate 1.2%) after ASA compared with 84% (p=0.06) in a matched background population. The 10-year survival free of SCD was 95% (annual SCD rate 0.5%). ASA reduced the prevalence of abnormal blood pressure response (from 23% to 9%, p
PubMed ID
23644300 View in PubMed
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Ambulance despatchers' estimation of intensity of pain and presence of associated symptoms in relation to outcome in patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54720
Source
Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1789-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
A. Bång
L. Isaksson
T. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1789-94
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Chest Pain - classification - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Pain Measurement
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large number of patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain have an acute ischaemic event, but some do not. AIM. To relate the ambulance despatcher's estimated severity of pain and presence of associated symptoms, in patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain, to whether they develop acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to the risk of early death. PATIENTS: All those with acute chest pain who contacted the despatch centre in Göteborg over a 2-month period. RESULTS: In all, 503 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients judged as having severe chest pain (68%) developed AMI during the first 3 days in hospital on 26% of occasions as compared with 13% among patients judged as having only vague chest pain (P = 0.0004). The difference was less marked among the elderly and women. The presence of any of the following associated symptoms, dyspnoea, nausea, vertigo, cold sweat or syncope, tended to be associated with a higher infarction rate (24%) than if none of these symptoms was present (17%, P = 0.06). Mortality during the pre-hospital and the hospital phase was not associated with the estimated severity of pain or the presence of associated symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The despatcher's estimation of the severity of pain and the presence of associated symptoms appears to be associated with the development of AMI but not with early mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1747-88681995
PubMed ID
8682008 View in PubMed
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An increase in sudden unexpected cardiac deaths among young Swedish orienteers during 1979-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54649
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):902-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
L. Wesslén
C. Påhlson
O. Lindquist
E. Hjelm
J. Gnarpe
E. Larsson
U. Baandrup
L. Eriksson
J. Fohlman
L. Engstrand
T. Linglöf
C. Nyström-Rosander
H. Gnarpe
L. Magnius
C. Rolf
G. Friman
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):902-10
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Myocarditis - microbiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serologic Tests
Sex Distribution
Sports
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sixteen cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death, 15 males and one female, are known to have occurred among young Swedish orienteers from 1979 to 1992, of which seven cases occurred between 1989 and 1992. This is considered to be indicative of an increased death rate. RESULTS: Histopathological evaluation showed myocarditis in a higher than expected proportion of cases. In one such case, which we studied before the sudden unexpected death occurred, the victim had suffered a Chlamydia pneumoniae infection verified by serology, and a nucleotide sequence was found in the heart and lung by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that hybridized with a probe specific for that organism. Male Swedish orienteers do not, however, seem to have an increased rate of exposure to this agent. No further sudden unexpected deaths among young orienteers have occurred over the past 3.5 years. At the beginning of that period, attempts were made to modify training habits and attitudes.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Jun;17(6):810-28781814
PubMed ID
8781830 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae in young Swedish orienteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53872
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(8):589-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
E. Hjelm
L. Wesslén
H. Gnarpe
J. Gnarpe
C. Nyström-Rosander
C. Rolf
G. Friman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(8):589-92
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Cardiomyopathies - complications - microbiology
Chlamydophila Infections - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sports
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During 1992-93 sera from 1790 Swedish elite orienteers were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae. The reason for this was that a cluster of 16 cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death had occurred among Swedish orienteers and DNA from C. pneumoniae had been found in the myocarditic heart and in the lung in 1 of 2 deceased athletes in whom testing was feasible; in addition, C. pneumoniae IgG was found in all 5 cases where serum was available. Among the orienteers, the prevalence rates of IgG antibodies in males and females were 54% (n = 1194) and 50% (n = 596), respectively. The corresponding figures for 319 male and female blood donors were 60% (n = 169) and 53% (n = 150), respectively. These differences are not statistically significant. Male orienteers had a lower prevalence of IgA antibodies than male blood donors (19% and 26%, respectively; p
PubMed ID
11525352 View in PubMed
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215 records – page 1 of 22.