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Cochlear Implant Access in Six Developed Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275390
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2016 Feb;37(2):e161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Donna L Sorkin
Craig A Buchman
Source
Otol Neurotol. 2016 Feb;37(2):e161-4
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Cochlear Implantation
Cochlear Implants - utilization
Deafness - surgery
Delivery of Health Care
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Female
Germany
Great Britain
Humans
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Access to cochlear implantation varies greatly around the world. It is affected by factors that are specific to each country's health care system, by awareness, and by societal attitudes regarding deafness.
Cochlear implant clinicians and researchers from six countries explored and discussed these variations and their likely causes: Robert Briggs from Australia; Wolfe-Dieter Baumgartner from Austria; Thomas Lenarz from Germany; Eva Koltharp from Sweden; Christopher Raine from the United Kingdom, and Craig Buchman, Donna Sorkin, and Christine Yoshinago from the United States.
Utilization rates are quite different for the pediatric and adult demographics in all six countries. Pediatric utilization ranges in the six countries (all in the developed world) ranged from a low of 50% in the United States to a high of 97% in Australia. Adult utilization is less than 10% everywhere in the world.
Pediatric access to care was excellent for children with the exception of Germany and the United States where there is an inadequate referral system. Adult utilization was low everywhere because of the lack of screening for adults and the fact that primary care physicians and even audiologists are unfamiliar with CI candidacy criteria and outcomes, and hence typically do not make patient referrals.
PubMed ID
26719962 View in PubMed
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[Ear banks--difficulties and results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245881
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1980 Apr;9(2):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
P. Savary
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1980 Apr;9(2):177-83
Date
Apr-1980
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry
Deafness - surgery
Ear Ossicles - transplantation
Hearing - physiology
Hospital Departments
Humans
Insurance, Health
Quebec
Stapes Surgery
Tissue Banks - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Transplantation, Homologous
Tympanic Membrane - transplantation
Tympanoplasty - methods
Abstract
The author presents the various difficulties in the formation of a bank of tympano-ossicular homografts. The difficulties are in the laws, the costs, and the technique. The question is : Are the difficulties greater than the results? After four years, the results obtained at the Hôtel Dieu in Quebec City seem to prove that if the indications remain restricted, we should keep on the efforts to form private banks. The global results for 90 cases are 77 per cent of tympanic integrity and 58 per cent with less than 20 dB of air-bone gap.
PubMed ID
7373692 View in PubMed
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Parental and program's decision making in paediatric simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation: who says no and why?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149600
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2009 Oct;73(10):1325-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
James D Ramsden
Vicky Papaioannou
Karen A Gordon
Adrian L James
Blake C Papsin
Author Affiliation
Cochlear Implant Program, The Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. james.ramsden@orh.nhs.uk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2009 Oct;73(10):1325-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cochlear Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Cochlear Implants
Cohort Studies
Deafness - surgery
Decision Making
Equipment Failure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - surgery
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Selection
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate initial candidacy for bilateral simultaneous cochlear implantation in children.
Prospective case series.
Tertiary academic pediatric hospital.
As part of our research protocol all children eligible for cochlear implantation were assessed for suitability to receive a simultaneous bilateral implant. Over a 12-month period (January to December 2007) 78 children received a total of 95 cochlear implants. Children with sequential second implants (24), revision cases (4), and out of province recipients (4) were excluded. The remaining 46 patients were assessed for bilateral simultaneous implantation.
Team/parental decision to proceed with bilateral simultaneous implantation.
17 children (37%) received simultaneous bilateral implants. 29 children (63%) were not considered suitable for simultaneous bilateral implantation. Reasons included developmental delay (10), residual borderline hearing in the second ear (9), parental/patient refusal (6), abnormally poor speech development for age (2), and abnormal cochlear anatomy precluding implantation (2). None were considered unsuitable for the more prolonged operative procedure on medical grounds.
Although bilateral implantation is thought to produce the optimal auditory outcome, not all patients are suitable, nor do all parents wish to proceed, when assessed for simultaneous implantation. Some of these patients are likely to be candidates for sequential bilateral implantation in due course.
PubMed ID
19616316 View in PubMed
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Relationship between intracochlear electrode position and tinnitus in cochlear implantees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270844
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2015 Aug;135(8):781-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ingo Todt
Grit Rademacher
Sven Mutze
Ravi Ramalingam
Selene Wolter
Philipp Mittmann
Jan Wagner
Arne Ernst
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2015 Aug;135(8):781-5
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cochlear Implants - adverse effects
Deafness - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrodes, Implanted - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Scala Tympani - surgery
Tinnitus - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cochlear implant electrode position has an impact on the rate of tinnitus suppression and generation.
Suppression of pre-operative tinnitus or a generation of a new tinnitus in cochlear implantees is a known effect of cochlear implantation. The aim of the current study was to evaluate different cochlear implant electrode positions and their relationship with tinnitus suppression and tinnitus generation.
This study retrospectively evaluated four groups of CI recipients with radiologically evaluated electrode positions in relation to their subjective tinnitus quality, as evaluated by an analogue loudness scale (ALS) and a questionnaire. Group 1 consisted of 19 patients with a scalar change of the electrode position. Group 2 consisted of 18 patients with a scala tympani position and a perimodiolar electrode. Group 3 consisted of 10 patients with a scala tympani position and a lateral wall electrode. Group 4 consisted of eight patients with a scala vestibuli position.
An overall tinnitus suppression rate of 45.9% and a generation of a new tinnitus or the deterioration of an existing one of 5.6% were observed. A significant difference in tinnitus suppression was found between groups 1 and groups 2, 3, and 4 in tinnitus suppression and tinnitus generation.
PubMed ID
25812721 View in PubMed
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Reports from the Conseil d'Evaluation des Technologies de la Santé du Québec (CETS). The cochlear implant in adults, adolescents, and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206124
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1997;13(4):642-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

[The deaf can be hearing--cochlear implantation. The Danish Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198887
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Mar 20;162(12):1723
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2000
Author
D B Pedersen
M. Tos
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Mar 20;162(12):1723
Date
Mar-20-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cochlear Implantation
Cochlear Implants
Deafness - surgery
Denmark
Humans
Otolaryngology
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
10766650 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.