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An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275277
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Nora Hiivala
Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa
Hanna-Leena Tefke
Heikki Murtomaa
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dissent and Disputes
Expert Testimony
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Harm - classification - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Risk Management
Sex Factors
Abstract
Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland.
The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases.
Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications.
Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.
PubMed ID
25967591 View in PubMed
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