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30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
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An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275277
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Nora Hiivala
Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa
Hanna-Leena Tefke
Heikki Murtomaa
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dissent and Disputes
Expert Testimony
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Harm - classification - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Risk Management
Sex Factors
Abstract
Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland.
The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases.
Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications.
Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.
PubMed ID
25967591 View in PubMed
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Care and outcomes of patients newly hospitalized for heart failure in the community treated by cardiologists compared with other specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184813
Source
Circulation. 2003 Jul 15;108(2):184-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2003
Author
Philip Jong
Yanyan Gong
Peter P Liu
Peter C Austin
Douglas S Lee
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Heart & Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Circulation. 2003 Jul 15;108(2):184-91
Date
Jul-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Failure - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internal Medicine - standards - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine - standards - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Management
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Specialization
Abstract
It is not known whether subspecialty care by cardiologists improves outcomes in heart failure patients from the community over care by other physicians.
Using administrative data, we monitored 38 702 consecutive patients with first-time hospitalization for heart failure in Ontario, Canada, between April 1994 and March 1996 and examined differences in processes of care and clinical outcomes between patients attended by physicians of different disciplines. We found that patients attended by cardiologists had lower 1-year risk-adjusted mortality than those attended by general internists, family practitioners, and other physicians (28.5% versus 31.7%, 34.9%, and 35.9%, respectively; all pairwise comparisons, P
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2003 Jul 15;108(2):129-3112860891
PubMed ID
12821540 View in PubMed
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Constructing a population-based research database from routine maternal screening records: a resource for studying alloimmunization in pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129128
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27619
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Brian K Lee
Alexander Ploner
Zhongxing Zhang
Gunilla Gryfelt
Agneta Wikman
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27619
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocytes - immunology
Female
Geography
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Isoantibodies - immunology
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Parturition
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Rh Isoimmunization - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Although screening for maternal red blood cell antibodies during pregnancy is a standard procedure, the prevalence and clinical consequences of non-anti-D immunization are poorly understood. The objective was to create a national database of maternal antibody screening results that can be linked with population health registers to create a research resource for investigating these issues.
Each birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was uniquely identified and linked to the text stored in routine maternal antibody screening records in the time window from 9 months prior to 2 weeks after the delivery date. These text records were subjected to a computerized search for specific antibodies using regular expressions. To illustrate the research potential of the resulting database, selected antibody prevalence rates are presented as tables and figures, and the complete data (from more than 60 specific antibodies) presented as online moving graphical displays.
More than one million (1,191,761) births with valid screening information from 1982-2002 constitute the study population. Computerized coverage of screening increased steadily over time and varied by region as electronic records were adopted. To ensure data quality, we restricted analysis to birth records in areas and years with a sustained coverage of at least 80%, representing 920,903 births from 572,626 mothers in 17 of the 24 counties in Sweden. During the study period, non-anti-D and anti-D antibodies occurred in 76.8/10,000 and 14.1/10,000 pregnancies respectively, with marked differences between specific antibodies over time.
This work demonstrates the feasibility of creating a nationally representative research database from the routine maternal antibody screening records from an extended calendar period. By linkage with population registers of maternal and child health, such data are a valuable resource for addressing important clinical questions, such as the etiological significance of non-anti-D antibodies.
Notes
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Cites: Med Princ Pract. 2005 Jul-Aug;14(4):230-415961931
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2006 Nov-Dec;13(6):691-516929043
Cites: Transfusion. 2008 May;48(5):941-5218248570
Cites: Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2008 Aug;13(4):207-1418396474
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(8):843-818704776
Cites: Blood Rev. 2000 Mar;14(1):44-6110805260
Cites: Vox Sang. 2003 Nov;85(4):328-3714633261
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Jan;61(1):25-306401853
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Aug 15;129(4):343-56409390
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(5):431-66421084
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Jun 1;134(11):1259-613011235
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1986 Oct;93(10):1038-433790463
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):143-82367825
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Aug;72(6):434-88394620
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Oct;74(9):687-927572101
Cites: Vox Sang. 2006 Nov;91(4):316-2317105607
PubMed ID
22140452 View in PubMed
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The impact of new chemotherapeutic and hormone agents on survival in a population-based cohort of women with metastatic breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162319
Source
Cancer. 2007 Sep 1;110(5):973-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2007
Author
Stephen K Chia
Caroline H Speers
Yulia D'yachkova
Anna Kang
Suzanne Malfair-Taylor
Jeff Barnett
Andy Coldman
Karen A Gelmon
Susan E O'reilly
Ivo A Olivotto
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. schia@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Cancer. 2007 Sep 1;110(5):973-9
Date
Sep-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Over the past decade, a number of new therapeutic agents have become available in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This study characterized the use and assessed the impact on survival of population-based access to new agents for the treatment of MBC.
The dates of release in British Columbia of 7 new systemic agents for MBC during the 1990s were used to construct 4 time cohorts. All patients with a first diagnosis of distant metastases in each of the time cohorts were identified and characterized, and their survival was compared. Cox proportional regression modeling was used to assess for predictors of survival.
In total, 2150 patients with a first distant metastases diagnosed during 1 of the 4 cohort intervals were identified. Baseline characteristics between cohorts were similar, except a greater proportion of the later cohorts received adjuvant chemotherapy (P
PubMed ID
17647245 View in PubMed
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Increased winter mortality from acute myocardial infarction and stroke: the effect of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201851
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Jun;33(7):1916-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
T. Sheth
C. Nair
J. Muller
S. Yusuf
Author Affiliation
Preventive Cardiology and Therapeutics, Hamilton General Hospital and Division of Cardiology, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Jun;33(7):1916-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Survival Rate
Abstract
We examined seasonal variations in mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke by age using 300,000 deaths in the Canadian Mortality Database for the years 1980 to 1982 and 1990 to 1992.
The effect of age on environmental determinants of AMI and stroke is not well understood.
Seasonal variations were analyzed by month and for the four seasons (winter beginning in December). A chi-square test was used to test for homogeneity at p 85 years (p 85 years (p
PubMed ID
10362193 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.