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2380 records – page 1 of 238.

20 Years of standard patch testing in an eczema population with focus on patients with multiple contact allergies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162478
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Aug;57(2):76-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Berit Christina Carlsen
Torkil Menné
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, 2820 Gentofte, Denmark. bccarlsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Aug;57(2):76-83
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Allergens - diagnostic use
Child
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eczema - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - methods
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Abstract
Results of standard patch tests performed with the same methodology in one centre are rarely available over a large time span. This gives the unique opportunity to study not only prevalence but also persistency of contact allergy and characterize subpopulations. The objectives were to investigate sensitivity rates and persistencies of patch test results and characterize patients with multiple contact allergies. A 20-year retrospective database-based study of 14 998 patients patch tested with the European Standard Series was performed. 34.5% were sensitized, primarily women. Sensitivity to nickel was most frequent and least frequent to mercaptobenzothiazole, N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine and benzocaine. Yearly proportion of negative, mono/double-allergic, and multiple-allergic cases remained stable. Persistency of positive reactions was high for para-phenylenediamine, Cl(Me)isothiazolinone, and primin and poor for paraben mix. 5.1% were multiple allergic, primarily women, and 90% got diagnosed by the first test. Frequency of multiple allergies increased with age. More multiple- than mono/double-allergic patients were tested multiple times. Persistency and sensitivity rates in a Danish eczema population are provided and are useful for decisions regarding the standard series. Patients with multiple contact allergies are typically elderly women who might have long-lasting and hard-to-treat eczema. Cumulative environmental exposure seems necessary to develop multiple allergies.
PubMed ID
17627644 View in PubMed
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25 years of pharmacoepidemiologic innovation: the Saskatchewan health administrative databases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138275
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2011;18(2):e245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

2008 Niday Perinatal Database quality audit: report of a quality assurance project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128969
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
S. Dunn
J. Bottomley
A. Ali
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Ontario), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sadunn@ohri.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Databases, Factual - standards
Humans
Medical Records
Perinatal care
Quality Control
Abstract
This quality assurance project was designed to determine the reliability, completeness and comprehensiveness of the data entered into Niday Perinatal Database.
Quality of the data was measured by comparing data re-abstracted from the patient record to the original data entered into the Niday Perinatal Database. A representative sample of hospitals in Ontario was selected and a random sample of 100 linked mother and newborn charts were audited for each site. A subset of 33 variables (representing 96 data fields) from the Niday dataset was chosen for re-abstraction.
Of the data fields for which Cohen's kappa statistic or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated, 44% showed substantial or almost perfect agreement (beyond chance). However, about 17% showed less than 95% agreement and a kappa or ICC value of less than 60% indicating only slight, fair or moderate agreement (beyond chance).
Recommendations to improve the quality of these data fields are presented.
PubMed ID
22153174 View in PubMed
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Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaare Meier
Lone Nikolajsen
Morten Flink
Ronnie Simonsen
Ioanna Milidou
Troels Staehelin Jensen
Jens Christian Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; ITmedico, Aarhus, Denmark; Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - therapy
Computer Security
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Employment
Humans
Internet
Neuralgia - drug therapy - therapy
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Software
Spinal Cord Stimulation - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
?? Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is increasingly gaining widespread use as a treatment for chronic pain. A widely used electronic registry could play a pivotal role in improving this complex and cost-?intensive treatment. We aimed to construct a comprehensive, universally available data base for SCS.
?? The design considerations behind a new online data base for SCS are presented; basic structure, technical issues, research applications, and future perspectives are described.
?? The Aarhus Neuromodulation Database covers core SCS treatment parameters, including procedure-?related details and complications, and features recording of key success parameters such as pain intensity, work status, and quality of life. It combines easy access to patient information with exhaustive data extraction options, and it can readily be adapted and expanded to suit different needs, including other neuromodulation treatment modalities.
?? We believe that the data base described in this article offers a powerful and versatile data collection tool suited for both clinicians and researchers in the field. The basic data base structure is immediately available on a no?-cost basis, and we invite our colleagues to make use of the data base as part of the efforts to further the field of neuromodulation.
PubMed ID
22882331 View in PubMed
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Abdominal Wall Defects in Greenland 1989-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292123
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Jul 03; 109(11):836-842
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-03-2017
Author
Merete Bugge
Gitte Drachmann
Peder Kern
Esben Budtz-Jørgensen
Hans Eiberg
Britta Olsen
Niels Tommerup
Inge-Merete Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Jul 03; 109(11):836-842
Date
Jul-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Wall - physiopathology
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Digestive System Abnormalities - complications
Female
Gastroschisis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Greenland
Hernia, Umbilical - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Registries
Stillbirth
Abstract
In the last decades, an increasing rate of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele has been reported worldwide. Greenland is the world's largest island, but 80% is covered by an ice cap, it has a small population of around 56,000 peoples (as of 2016). The occurrence of abdominal wall defects has never been investigated in Greenland.
The present study is based on data retrieved from three nationwide and two local registries in the Greenlandic health care system over 27 years (1989-2015).
We identified 33 infants with abdominal wall defects born in the study time period. All cases were reclassified to 28 cases of gastroschisis, four cases of omphalocele, and there was 1 infant in the indeterminate group. The point prevalence at birth for gastroschisis increased significantly from 8 to 35 (average 10.7) per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants. Mothers below 20 years of age represented 23% of all cases and the prevalence for this group was 17 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn. Perinatal mortality for infants with gastroschisis was high (18%), and 1 year survival was 71%. For omphalocele, the prevalence varied from 8 to 11 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn infants. There was no increasing rate in the period, further highlighting an etiological difference between gastroschisis and omphalocele.
This study confirms the increasing prevalence of gastroschisis in Greenland in the period from 1989 to 2015. The average was 10.7 per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the highest prevalence ever reported. Birth Defects Research 109:836-842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
28464537 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Access Governance for Biobanks: The Case of the BioSHaRE-EU Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279361
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jane Kaye
Linda Briceño Moraia
Colin Mitchell
Jessica Bell
Jasper Adriaan Bovenberg
Anne-Marie Tassé
Bartha Maria Knoppers
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual
European Union
Finland
Germany
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Interprofessional Relations
Netherlands
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Currently, researchers have to apply separately to individual biobanks if they want to carry out studies that use samples and data from multiple biobanks. This article analyzes the access governance arrangements of the original five biobank members of the Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union (BioSHaRE-EU) project in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom to identify similarities and differences in policies and procedures, and consider the potential for internal policy "harmonization." Our analysis found differences in the range of researchers and organizations eligible to access biobanks; application processes; requirements for Research Ethics Committee approval; and terms of Material Transfer Agreements relating to ownership and commercialization. However, the main elements of access are the same across biobanks; access will be granted to bona fide researchers conducting research in the public interest, and all biobanks will consider the scientific merit of the proposed use and it's compatibility with the biobank's objectives. These findings suggest potential areas for harmonization across biobanks. This could be achieved through a single centralized application to a number of biobanks or a system of mutual recognition that places a presumption in favor of access to one biobank if already approved by another member of the same consortium. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure-European Research Infrastructure Consortia (BBMRI-ERIC), a European consortium of biobanks and bioresources with its own ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) common service, could provide a platform by developing guidelines for harmonized internal processes.
PubMed ID
27183185 View in PubMed
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Accessing health care utilization databases for health research: a Canadian longitudinal study on aging feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147705
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Parminder S Raina
Susan A Kirkland
Christina Wolfson
Karen Szala-Meneok
Lauren E Griffith
Homa Keshavarz
Jennifer Uniat
Linda Furlini
Camille L Angus
Geoff Strople
Amélie Pelletier
Author Affiliation
McMaster Evidence-based Practice Center, McMaster University, Canada. praina@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Feasibility Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Medical Record Linkage
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
ABSTRACTOne of the keys to the success of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) will be the leveraging of secondary data sources, particularly health care utilization (HCU) data. To examine the practical, methodological, and ethical aspects of accessing HCU data, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 data stewards and privacy commissioners/ombudsmen from across Canada. Study participants indicated that obtaining permission to access HCU data is generally possible; however, they noted that this will be a complex and lengthy process requiring considerable and meticulous preparatory work to ensure proper documentation and compliance with jurisdictional variations along legislative and policy lines.
PubMed ID
19860983 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and validity of using medical claims data to identify episodes of hospitalizations in patients with COPD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173070
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Jan;15(1):19-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Amir Abbas Tahami Monfared
Jacques Lelorier
Author Affiliation
Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit, Centre de Recherche, Campus Hôtel-Dieu, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Jan;15(1):19-29
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Algorithms
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - methods
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In Quebec, MED-ECHO database can be used to estimate inhospital length of stay (LOS) and number of hospitalizations (NOH) both accurately and reliably. However, access to MED-ECHO database is time-consuming. Quebec medical claims database (RAMQ) can be used as an alternative source to estimate these measures. Considering MED-ECHO as the 'gold standard,' this study examined the validity of using RAMQ medical claims to estimate LOS and NOH.
We used a cohort of 3768 elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) between 1990 and 1996 and identified those with inhospital claims. Inhospital LOS was defined as the total number of days with inhospital claims. Various grace periods (1-15 days) between consecutive claims were considered for the estimation of LOS and NOH. RAMQ and MED-ECHO databases were linked using unique patient identifiers. Estimates obtained from RAMQ data were compared to those from MED-ECHO using various measures of central tendency and predictive error estimates.
Overall, 32.7% of patients were hospitalized at least once during the study period based on RAMQ claims, as compared to 32.0% in MED-ECHO ( p-value = 0.51). The best estimates [mean (p-value)] were found to be those obtained when using a 7-day grace period. RAMQ versus MED-ECHO estimates were: 12.2 versus 13.5 days (
PubMed ID
16136613 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in identifying patients with loss of consciousness in a police-operated emergency call centre - first step in the chain of survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163888
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Bach
E F Christensen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Aarhus Traumacentre, Aarhus, Denmark. allanbach@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Emergencies
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Heart Arrest - diagnosis
Humans
Police
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Telephone
Unconsciousness - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Wakefulness
Abstract
The first link in the 'chain of survival' is the activation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). In the major part of Denmark, police officers operate the alarm 1-1-2 centre, including calls for EMS. Our aim was to study the police 1-1-2 operators' accuracy in identifying calls concerning patients with loss of consciousness as a key symptom of life-threatening conditions. 'Unconsciousness' was defined as patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of or = 9, 972 of whom were reported 'awake', giving a specificity of 72%. The positive predictive value (percentage of patients found with a GCS score of
PubMed ID
17465976 View in PubMed
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2380 records – page 1 of 238.