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Age and meanings of violence: women's experiences of partner violence in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182328
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jan;19(1):30-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Minna Piispa
Author Affiliation
Statistics Finland.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jan;19(1):30-48
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Culture
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Self Disclosure
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The first survey carried out in Finland specifically to study men's violence against women showed that partner violence is quite common in Finland and it is directed especially toward young women. The statistical findings don't support the idea that violence has become more widespread in Finland. Life situation factors that are usually viewed as making women vulnerable to spousal violence, such as having children, cohabiting, low educational level, and financial dependency on the male partner, failed to explain partnership violence against women in Finland as such, too. The author's objective is to find out whether meanings of violence have changed and whether this could be one reason why young women report in a survey such cases of violence that other women would not. This could explain why violence in partnerships is so common among young women in Finland.
PubMed ID
14680528 View in PubMed
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The Aggression Observation Short Form identified episodes not reported on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale--Revised.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266542
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jun;35(6):464-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jacob Hvidhjelm
Dorte Sestoft
Jakob Bue Bjørner
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jun;35(6):464-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - nursing
Middle Aged
Nursing Records - statistics & numerical data
Observation
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Risk Management
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the underreporting of violence and aggression on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) when compared to a simpler assessment: the Aggression Observation Short Form (AOS). During a period of one year, two open and two closed wards gathered data on both the SOAS-R and the AOS for all of their patients. The 22-item SOAS-R is to be filled out after each violent episode. The 3-item AOS is to be filled out during each shift and should also record the absence of violence. The SOAS-R registered 703 incidents and the AOS registered 1,281 incidents. The agreement between the SOAS-R and the AOS was good (kappa = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.62-0.67). Among the 1,281 AOS episodes, 51% were also registered on the SOAS-R. For the 176 AOS episodes with harm, 42% were also registered on the SOAS-R. We found 44% missing registrations on the AOS, primarily for open wards and for patients with short admission lengths. Standard instruments such as the SOAS-R underreport aggressive episodes by 45% or more. Underreporting can be reduced by introducing shorter instruments, but it cannot be completely eliminated.
PubMed ID
24857530 View in PubMed
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Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
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An overview of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191052
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a multicenter, population-based cohort study of dementia with a sample of 10,263 participants aged 65 or over. Field work began in 1991, and a follow-up study was undertaken in 1996-97. The present article describes the origins and objectives of the study, provides an overview of its design, organization, and data collection methods, and offers a brief summary of the main results.
PubMed ID
11892976 View in PubMed
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Assessing hypertension in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191070
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:115-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H S Davis
H R Merry
C. MacKnight
K. Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:115-23
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Incidence
Male
Mathematical Computing
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Risk
Stroke - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
We investigated the self-report hypertension variables in the CSHA, recorded in the screening questionnaire and the Self-Administered Risk Factor (SARF) questionnaire. The two questions showed high agreement (phi coefficient 0.83). Each was modestly but significantly associated with other simultaneous reports of heart disease and stroke, and with subsequent mortality. Only the SARF asked questions about treatment; controlling for treatment effects, five-year survival was longest among those with no hypertension and no treatment (mean survival time 1,645 days; 95% CI 1,632 to 1,658), and shortest for those with no reported hypertension who were receiving "antihypertensive" medications presumably prescribed for other cardiovascular disease (mean survival time 1,496 days; 95% CI 1,457 to 1,535). The SARF questions incorporating high blood pressure and treatment appear preferable to assess the risks associated with hypertension.
PubMed ID
11892958 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about medicines among Swedish pharmacy employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82229
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Jörgensen Tove M
Andersson Karolina A
Mårdby Ann-Charlotte M
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, P.O. Box 453, 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden. Tove.Jorgensen@socmed.gu.se
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2006 Aug;28(4):233-8
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Contraceptives, Oral - therapeutic use
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homeopathy - statistics & numerical data
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medicine, Herbal - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pharmacies
Pharmacists - classification - psychology
Pharmacists' Aides - classification - psychology
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the beliefs about medicines among pharmacy employees. A further aim was to analyse whether these beliefs were associated with any background characteristics, such as age, professional category or medication use. METHOD: The study subjects were pharmacy employees at 24 community pharmacies in Göteborg, Sweden. The participating pharmacies had a total of 372 employees (pharmacists, dispensing pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians). Data was collected at the weekly pharmacy information meetings with a questionnaire comprising background questions and the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ). The general part of the BMQ was used. For each statement in the BMQ, respondents marked their degree of agreement on a five-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3=uncertain, 4=agree and 5=strongly agree). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The three subscales of BMQ General: General Harm, General Overuse and General Benefit. RESULTS: The majority of the 292 respondents were dispensing pharmacists. More than half of the respondents were aged 45 years or older and had worked in a pharmacy for 20 years or more. Compared to the other professional categories, a higher proportion of dispensing pharmacists stated that they currently used traditional medicines. The pharmacy employees had a mean score for General Benefit of 4.31 and a mean score for General Harm of 1.81. Pharmacists and dispensing pharmacists in general regarded medicines as somewhat more beneficial, whereas pharmacy technicians viewed medicines as slightly more harmful. Those who had worked in a pharmacy for 30-34 years regarded medicines as less harmful compared to those who had worked 0-4 years. Compared to non-users, current users of prescription drugs regarded medicines as more beneficial. When controlling for background characteristics, no confounders were detected for any of the three subscales (ANCOVA analyses). CONCLUSION: Results of the study of 292 Swedish pharmacy employees show that they regard medicines as beneficial rather than harmful and that there are differences in beliefs between the professional categories. However, the reasons for these differences remain unclear. Nevertheless, the positive beliefs among pharmacy employees may have an impact on the communication with clients and, eventually, clients' adherence to medicines.
PubMed ID
16691361 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;37(10):1009-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
J. Jacobs
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;37(10):1009-10
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Truth Disclosure
Notes
Comment On: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1998 Jan;37(1):10-29444889
Comment On: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;36(7):971-99204676
PubMed ID
9785711 View in PubMed
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Bias in retrospective studies of trends in asthma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15193
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Feb;23(2):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
J. Brogger
T. Eagan
G E Eide
P. Bakke
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Dept of Thoracic Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. jan.brogger@med.uib.no
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Feb;23(2):281-6
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology
Bias (epidemiology)
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
There is evidence for an increase in adult asthma prevalence. Several retrospective studies have shown an increase in asthma incidence by year of birth, consistent with an increasing trend in asthma incidence. The validity of this retrospective approach is unknown. Retrospective and prospective asthma incidence by year of birth were compared in the same community, during the same time period, from two independent studies; a cohort study and a cross-sectional study in Western Norway. In the prospective study, subjects without asthma were followed from 1985-1996/1997. In the retrospective study in 1998, subjects reported the age at which the disease started. Analyses of incident asthma in the period 1985-1996 were compared between the studies. The retrospective analysis showed a large increase in asthma incidence by year of birth, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.9 comparing those born in 1969 with those born in 1927. The prospective study showed the opposite, with an OR of 0.2 comparing those born in 1969 with those born in 1927. There was only a 20% difference in the cumulative incidence of asthma. To conclude, retrospective estimates of trends in asthma incidence are likely to be severely biased by differential recall.
PubMed ID
14979504 View in PubMed
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Breast implants and breast cancer--reanalysis of a linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214943
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jun 8;332(23):1535-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-1995
Author
H. Bryant
P. Brasher
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Prevention and Screening, Alberta Cancer Board, Calgary, Canada.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jun 8;332(23):1535-9
Date
Jun-8-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Breast Implants - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mammaplasty
Middle Aged
Probability
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Abstract
In 1992, Berkel and colleagues reported in the Journal the results of their study of the potential association of breast augmentation and breast cancer. The study reported that women who had breast augmentation had a significantly lower subsequent risk of breast cancer (P
PubMed ID
7739707 View in PubMed
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87 records – page 1 of 9.