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2008 Niday Perinatal Database quality audit: report of a quality assurance project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128969
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
S. Dunn
J. Bottomley
A. Ali
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Ontario), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sadunn@ohri.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Dec;32(1):32-42
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Databases, Factual - standards
Humans
Medical Records
Perinatal care
Quality Control
Abstract
This quality assurance project was designed to determine the reliability, completeness and comprehensiveness of the data entered into Niday Perinatal Database.
Quality of the data was measured by comparing data re-abstracted from the patient record to the original data entered into the Niday Perinatal Database. A representative sample of hospitals in Ontario was selected and a random sample of 100 linked mother and newborn charts were audited for each site. A subset of 33 variables (representing 96 data fields) from the Niday dataset was chosen for re-abstraction.
Of the data fields for which Cohen's kappa statistic or intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated, 44% showed substantial or almost perfect agreement (beyond chance). However, about 17% showed less than 95% agreement and a kappa or ICC value of less than 60% indicating only slight, fair or moderate agreement (beyond chance).
Recommendations to improve the quality of these data fields are presented.
PubMed ID
22153174 View in PubMed
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Access to health services by Canadians who are chronically ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174970
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Shannon M Spenceley
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Data Collection - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Research Design - standards
Abstract
Access to health care services in Canada has been identified as an urgent priority, and chronic disease has been suggested as the most pressing health concern facing Canadians. Access to services for Canadians living with chronic disease, however, has received little emphasis in the research literature or in health policy reform documents. A systematic review of research into factors impeding or facilitating access to formal health services for people in Canada living with chronic illness is presented. The review includes 31 studies of Canadian populations published between 1990 and 2002; main results were analyzed for facilitators and barriers to access for people experiencing chronic disease. An underlying organizing construct of symmetry between consumers, providers, and the larger Canadian system is suggested as a relevant lens from which to view the findings. Finally, a discussion of the relationship between identified factors and the principles of primary health care is offered.
PubMed ID
15870244 View in PubMed
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Advancing care for traumatic brain injury: findings from the IMPACT studies and perspectives on future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106604
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrew I R Maas
Gordon D Murray
Bob Roozenbeek
Hester F Lingsma
Isabella Butcher
Gillian S McHugh
James Weir
Juan Lu
Ewout W Steyerberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. Electronic address: andrew.maas@uza.be.
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Disease Management
Europe
Forecasting
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
International Cooperation
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods - standards
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Research Design
Symptom Assessment - standards
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Research in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is challenging for several reasons; in particular, the heterogeneity between patients regarding causes, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. Advances in basic science have failed to translate into successful clinical treatments, and the evidence underpinning guideline recommendations is weak. Because clinical research has been hampered by non-standardised data collection, restricted multidisciplinary collaboration, and the lack of sensitivity of classification and efficacy analyses, multidisciplinary collaborations are now being fostered. Approaches to deal with heterogeneity have been developed by the IMPACT study group. These approaches can increase statistical power in clinical trials by up to 50% and are also relevant to other heterogeneous neurological diseases, such as stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage. Rather than trying to limit heterogeneity, we might also be able to exploit it by analysing differences in treatment and outcome between countries and centres in comparative effectiveness research. This approach has great potential to advance care in patients with TBI.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1132-324139679
PubMed ID
24139680 View in PubMed
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Agreement between proxy- and case-reported information obtained using the self- administered Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry epidemiologic questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185270
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003;24(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Victoria Nadalin
Michelle Cotterchio
Gail McKeown-Eyssen
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003;24(1):1-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Data Collection - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Proxy
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Abstract
Case-control studies of fatal cancers often rely on proxy respondents. Therefore, it is important to determine the completeness and accuracy of proxy-reported information. We evaluated proxy reports using the Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry epidemiology questionnaire. A proxy questionnaire was completed by spouses or relatives identified by a sample of participating cases. Item non-response and percentage agreement (between case and proxy reports) were assessed. More than 30% of proxies were unable to report on physical activity, gynecological surgery, alcohol intake, weight 20 years ago, and oral contraceptive use. Proxy reports of medical history and bowel screening varied, the percentage missing ranging from 5% for diabetes to 44% for familial polyposis in the case of medical history, and from 4% for colonoscopy to 27% for hemoccult tests in the case of screening. Agreement between case and proxy report was good to excellent for colonic screening, most medical history, and for reproductive, medication and vitamin use variables (74% to 100%). It is useful to collect proxy information on such variables as medical history, parity, colonic screening and vitamin use, whereas oral contraceptive use and previous weight are not well reported.
PubMed ID
12757630 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of quality data based on national clinical databases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148514
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 14;171(38):2723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-2009
Author
Jan Utzon
Anette Lykke Petri
Sten Christophersen
Author Affiliation
Enhed for Klinisk Kvalitet, Region Hovedstaden, Bispebjerg Hospital, DK-2400 København NV. janutzon@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 14;171(38):2723-7
Date
Sep-14-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Data Collection - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Databases, Factual - standards
Denmark
Humans
Internet
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Registries - standards
Selection Bias
Abstract
There is little agreement on the philosophy of measuring clinical quality in health care. How data should be analyzed and transformed to healthcare information is an ongoing discussion. To accept a difference in quality between health departments as a real difference, one should consider to which extent the selection of patients, random variation, confounding and inconsistency may have influenced results. The aim of this article is to summarize aspects of clinical healthcare data analyses provided from the national clinical quality databases and to show how data may be presented in a way which is understandable to readers without specialised knowledge of statistics.
PubMed ID
19758494 View in PubMed
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Assessing data quality: a computerized approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231412
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(2):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
L L Roos
S M Sharp
A. Wajda
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Management, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(2):175-82
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection - standards
Database Management Systems
Hospital records
Humans
Manitoba
Medical Records
Software
Abstract
With the growing reliance on large health care data bases, the need to verify data quality increases as well. Because of the considerable costs involved in checks using primary data collection, a computerized methodology for performing such checks is suggested. The technique seems appropriate for any situation where two data collection systems (i.e. hospital discharge abstracts and physician claims for payment) relate to the same event, such as a patient's hospitalization. After reviewing other approaches, this paper suggests linking physician claims for performing particular surgical procedures with hospital discharge abstracts for the stay in which the surgery took place. Physician and hospital data for adults age 25 and over in Manitoba from 1 April, 1979 to 31 March, 1984 were used to address the questions: 1. How well can the two data sets be linked? 2. Given linkage of the two data sets, how much agreement is there as to procedure and diagnosis? Linkage between hospital and physician data was excellent (over 95%) for 5 out of 11 surgical procedures (hysterectomy, prostatectomy, total hip replacement, coronary artery bypass surgery, and heart valve replacement); there was over 90% perfect agreement for three other procedures (cholecystectomy, cataract surgery and total knee replacement). Problems with matching the Manitoba Health Services Commission tariffs (on physician claims) with ICD-9-CM operation codes (on hospital data) led to only 77% perfect agreement for vascular surgery and 84% for gallbladder and biliary tract operations other than cholecystectomy; over 10% of the cases linked on surgeon and date but not on the designated procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2928827 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality at a transformer manufacturing plant: cohort construction and analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215037
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Jun;27(6):911-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
A. Yassi
R. Tate
D. Fish
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Jun;27(6):911-3
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - standards
Humans
Industrial Oils - adverse effects
Male
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Pancreatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Notes
Comment On: Am J Ind Med. 1995 Jun;27(6):905-107645583
PubMed ID
7645584 View in PubMed
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Chapter 1. Sweden's Fifth National Public Health Report. Health in Sweden: The National Public Health Report 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71809
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;58:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G. Persson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. gudrun.persson@sos.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;58:7-15
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection - standards
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - standards
Public Health - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
11708631 View in PubMed
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Commentary on Pedersen and Skardhamar (2010): does cannabis use predict non-drug offending?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98356
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
David P Farrington
Author Affiliation
Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK. dpf1@cam.ac.uk
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection - standards
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Dropouts
Young Adult
Notes
RefSource: Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):109-18
PubMed ID
20078465 View in PubMed
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Commentary: problems in Finnish or British data--or a true difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206600
Source
BMJ. 1998 Jan 10;316(7125):105-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1998
Author
S V Koskinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Disability, Helsinki, Finland. Seppo.Koskinen@ktl.fi
Source
BMJ. 1998 Jan 10;316(7125):105-6
Date
Jan-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Data Collection - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
London - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 1998 Jan 10;316(7125):100-59462313
PubMed ID
9462314 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.