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AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 performance measures on cardiac rehabilitation for referral to and delivery of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention services endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, Inter-American Heart Foundation, National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161050
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Oct 2;50(14):1400-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2007

Absolute fracture risk reporting in clinical practice: a physician-centered survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159036
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg R2H 2A6 Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Osteoporosis - economics - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Risk Assessment - economics - standards
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Non-expert clinical practitioners who had received bone density reports based on 10-year absolute fracture risk were surveyed to determine their response to this new system. Absolute fracture risk reporting was well received and was strongly preferred to traditional T-score-based reporting. Non-specialist physicians were particularly supportive of risk-based bone mineral density (BMD) reporting.
Absolute risk estimation is preferable to risk categorization based upon BMD alone. The objective of this study was to specifically assess the response of non-expert clinical practitioners to this approach.
In January 2006, the Province of Manitoba, Canada, started reporting 10-year osteoporotic fracture risks for patients aged 50 years and older based on the hip T-score, gender, age, and multiple clinical risk factors. In May 2006 and October 2006, a brief anonymous survey was sent to all physicians who had requested a BMD test during 2005 and 206 responses were received.
When asked whether the report contained the information needed to manage patients, the mean score for the absolute fracture risk report was higher than for the T-score-based report (p
PubMed ID
18239957 View in PubMed
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Access to patient services lacking: National Physician Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106453
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Dec 10;185(18):E813-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2013

Accuracy and validity of using medical claims data to identify episodes of hospitalizations in patients with COPD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173070
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Jan;15(1):19-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Amir Abbas Tahami Monfared
Jacques Lelorier
Author Affiliation
Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit, Centre de Recherche, Campus Hôtel-Dieu, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Jan;15(1):19-29
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Algorithms
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - methods
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In Quebec, MED-ECHO database can be used to estimate inhospital length of stay (LOS) and number of hospitalizations (NOH) both accurately and reliably. However, access to MED-ECHO database is time-consuming. Quebec medical claims database (RAMQ) can be used as an alternative source to estimate these measures. Considering MED-ECHO as the 'gold standard,' this study examined the validity of using RAMQ medical claims to estimate LOS and NOH.
We used a cohort of 3768 elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) between 1990 and 1996 and identified those with inhospital claims. Inhospital LOS was defined as the total number of days with inhospital claims. Various grace periods (1-15 days) between consecutive claims were considered for the estimation of LOS and NOH. RAMQ and MED-ECHO databases were linked using unique patient identifiers. Estimates obtained from RAMQ data were compared to those from MED-ECHO using various measures of central tendency and predictive error estimates.
Overall, 32.7% of patients were hospitalized at least once during the study period based on RAMQ claims, as compared to 32.0% in MED-ECHO ( p-value = 0.51). The best estimates [mean (p-value)] were found to be those obtained when using a 7-day grace period. RAMQ versus MED-ECHO estimates were: 12.2 versus 13.5 days (
PubMed ID
16136613 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in the recording of pressure ulcers and prevention after implementing an electronic health record in hospital care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155835
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2008 Aug;17(4):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
L. Gunningberg
M Fogelberg Dahm
A. Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
Surgery Division, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2008 Aug;17(4):281-5
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection - methods - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Pressure Ulcer - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the accuracy in recording of pressure-ulcer prevalence and prevention before and after implementing an electronic health record (EHR) with templates for pressure-ulcer assessment.
All inpatients at the departments of surgery, medicine and geriatrics were inspected for the presence of pressure ulcers, according to the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel-methodology, during 1 day in 2002 (n = 357) and repeated in 2006 (n = 343). The corresponding patient records were audited retrospectively for the presence of documentation on pressure ulcers.
In 2002, the prevalence of pressure ulcers obtained by auditing paper-based patient records (n = 413) was 14.3%, compared with 33.3% in physical inspection (n = 357). The largest difference was seen in the geriatric department, where records revealed 22.9% pressure ulcers and skin inspection 59.3%. Four years later, after the implementation of the EHR, there were 20.7% recorded pressure ulcers and 30.0% found by physical examination of patients. The accuracy of the prevalence data had improved most in the geriatric department, where the EHR showed 48.1% and physical examination 43.2% pressure ulcers. Corresponding figures in the surgical department were 22.2% and 14.1%, and in the medical department 29.9% and 10.2%, respectively. The patients received pressure-reducing equipment to a higher degree (51.6%) than documented in the patient record (7.9%) in 2006.
The accuracy in pressure-ulcer recording improved in the EHR compared with the paper-based health record. However, there were still deficiencies, which mean that patient records did not serve as a valid source of information on pressure-ulcer prevalence and prevention.
PubMed ID
18678726 View in PubMed
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Acute health effects common during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50823
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Langworth
H. Anundi
L. Friis
G. Johanson
M L Lind
E. Söderman
B A Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.langworth@pharmacia.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Collection - methods
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify possible health effects caused by different cleaning agents used in graffiti removal. METHODS: In 38 graffiti removers working 8-h shifts in the Stockholm underground system, the exposure to organic solvents was assessed by active air sampling, biological monitoring, and by interviews and a questionnaire. Health effects were registered, by physical examinations, porta7ble spirometers and self-administered questionnaires. The prevalence of symptoms was compared with 49 controls working at the underground depots, and with 177 population controls. RESULTS: The 8-h time-weighted average exposures (TWA) were low, below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents. The short-term exposures occasionally exceeded the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL), especially during work in poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators. The graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of tiredness and upper airway symptoms compared with the depot controls, and significantly more tiredness, headaches and symptoms affecting airways, eyes and skin than the population controls. Among the graffiti removers, some of the symptoms increased during the working day. On a group basis, the lung function registrations showed normal values. However, seven workers displayed a clear reduction of peak expiratory flow (PEF) over the working shift. CONCLUSIONS: Though their average exposure to organic solvents was low, the graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of unspecific symptoms such as fatigue and headache as well as irritative symptoms from the eyes and respiratory tract, compared with the controls. To prevent adverse health effects it is important to inform the workers about the health risks, and to restrict use of the most hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working practices and to encourage the use of personal protective equipment.
PubMed ID
11355296 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Finland--baseline data from the FINMONICA AMI register in 1983-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223821
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
J. Tuomilehto
M. Arstila
E. Kaarsalo
J. Kankaanpää
M. Ketonen
K. Kuulasmaa
S. Lehto
H. Miettinen
H. Mustaniemi
P. Palomäki
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Data Collection - methods - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Space-Time Clustering
Time Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) register of the FINMONICA study, the Finnish part of the WHO-coordinated multinational MONICA project, operates in the provinces of North Karelia and Kuopio in eastern Finland and in Turku, Loimaa and in communities around Loimaa in southwestern Finland. The AMI register serves as an instrument for the assessment of trends in mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) and of the incidence and attack rates of AMI among 25-64-year-old residents of the study areas. This report describes the methods used in the FINMONICA AMI register and the findings during the first 3 years of the study, in 1983-1985. The criteria of the multinational WHO MONICA project were used in the classification of fatal events and in the diagnosis of non-fatal definite AMI, but based on the experience within the FINMONICA study, stricter diagnostic criteria than those originally described in the WHO MONICA protocol were used for non-fatal possible AMI. This led to a marked improvement in the comparability of the data from the three study areas with regard to the incidence and attack rates of non-fatal AMI. During the 3-year period the total number of registered events was 6266 among men and 2092 among women. Among men the incidence and attack rates of AMI and mortality from CHD were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland. Also among women the incidence and attack rates of AMI were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland, whereas there was no regional difference in mortality from CHD among women. The mortality findings of the FINMONICA AMI Register were in good agreement with the official CHD mortality statistics of Finland.
Notes
Erratum In: Eur Heart J 1992 Aug;13(8):1153
PubMed ID
1618197 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings in Iceland: a prospective nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86765
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kristinsson Jakob
Palsson Runolfur
Gudjonsdottir Gudborg A
Blondal Margret
Gudmundsson Sigurdur
Snook Curtis P
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Child
Child, Preschool
Circadian Rhythm
Counseling - methods
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hazardous Substances - classification - poisoning
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Poison Control Centers - utilization
Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.
PubMed ID
18259960 View in PubMed
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Added value of health-related quality of life measurement in cancer clinical trials: the experience of the NCIC CTG.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144286
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2010 Apr;10(2):119-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Heather-Jane Au
Jolie Ringash
Michael Brundage
Michael Palmer
Harriet Richardson
Ralph M Meyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada. heather-jane.au@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2010 Apr;10(2):119-28
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic - methods
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Endpoint Determination
Health status
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Quality of Life
Abstract
Health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) data are often included in Phase III clinical trials. We evaluate and classify the value added to Phase III trials by HRQoL outcomes, through a review of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group clinical trials experience within various cancer patient populations. HRQoL may add value in a variety of ways, including the provision of data that may contrast with or may support the primary study outcome; or that assess a unique perspective or subgroup, not addressed by the primary outcome. Thus, HRQoL data may change the study's interpretation. Even in situations where HRQoL measurement does not alter the clinical interpretation of a trial, important methodologic advances can be made. A classification of the added value of HRQoL information is provided, which may assist in choosing trials for which measurement of HRQoL outcomes will be beneficial.
PubMed ID
20384559 View in PubMed
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Address unknown--or at least uncertain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206146
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
J J McGurran
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Vital statistics
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):535-419294392
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):549-519294395
PubMed ID
9526467 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.