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An assessment of potential injury surveillance data sources in Alaska using an emerging problem: all-terrain vehicle-associated injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6295
Source
Public Health Rep. 1989 Sep-Oct;104(5):493-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Smith
J P Middaugh
Author Affiliation
Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Public Health Rep. 1989 Sep-Oct;104(5):493-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Data Collection - economics - methods
Death Certificates
Government Agencies
Humans
Information Systems - utilization
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Using injuries associated with three-wheeled all-terrain vehicles in Alaska as an example, the existing injury data bases were assessed for usefulness, cost, simplicity, acceptability, flexibility, sensitivity, specificity, representativeness, and timeliness. In this study strengths and weaknesses of existing data for all-terrain vehicles were identified and ways to improve data collection and linkages across data systems are suggested. Based on this evaluation, linked death certificates and medical examiner data provide an excellent mechanism for monitoring vehicle-related fatalities. Information sources for nonfatal and nonvehicle-related injuries require further development. Police records provide supplemental information, but they are limited to the events reported to police. Although other sources were explored, they added no advantage to the primary sources. Data processing, analysis, and dissemination--traditional responsibilities for public health and other governmental agencies--can transform these data sources into meaningful mechanisms to define injury trends and monitor injury-specific intervention strategies.
PubMed ID
2508179 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of a lottery for increasing physicians' responses to a mail survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195508
Source
Eval Health Prof. 2001 Mar;24(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
G. Baron
P. De Wals
F. Milord
Author Affiliation
Faculté de médecine, Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Eval Health Prof. 2001 Mar;24(1):47-52
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection - economics - methods
Humans
Marketing of Health Services - economics - methods
Motivation
Physicians - psychology
Postal Service
Quebec
Abstract
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a lottery on physicians' responses to a mail survey, a randomized controlled trial was conducted with a random sample of 1,000 members of the Quebec Federation of General Practitioners in 1997. For the first mailing of this survey, each respondent was randomly assigned to the control or experimental group, which was offered participation in a lottery upon return of the questionnaire. Response rate was 41.2% in the experimental group and 34.8% in the control group, a 6.4% difference (CI95%: 0.6%-12.6%). The additional cost of the lottery was about Can$500, giving an incremental cost of Can$16 per questionnaire returned. In conclusion, a lottery resulted in a small but statistically significant increase in the response rate of physicians to a mail survey. This method may be a cost-effective option when applied to large surveys.
PubMed ID
11233584 View in PubMed
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[The Mother and Child Cohort Study will give new answers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81735
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1747-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2006
Author
Magnus Per
Haug Kjell
Nystad Wenche
Skjaerven Rolv
Author Affiliation
Divisjon for epidemiologi, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo. per.magnus@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1747-9
Date
Jun-22-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Child Welfare
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - economics - methods
Disease - etiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
Most severe diseases cannot be prevented. The main reason is lack of information about their causes. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is a population-based cohort with 100,000 children included from fetal life. The ambitious goal is to understand the causal chains behind diseases and the comprehensive data collection will allow many diseases to be addressed. The overall goal is to come up with good preventive measures. The purpose of this article is to inform about MoBa and to stimulate enhanced use of data collected during research.
PubMed ID
16794669 View in PubMed
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Up-to-date denominators: evaluation of taxation family file for public health planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216978
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Nov-Dec;85(6):413-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R A Spasoff
D T Gilkes
Author Affiliation
Dept of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Nov-Dec;85(6):413-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - economics - methods
Databases, Factual
Demography
Geography
Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income Tax
Population Density
Abstract
Public Health agencies need up-to-date population data, and Statistics Canada's Taxation Family File (T1FF) database, developed annually from T1 personal income tax forms, may meet this need. We compared 1989 T1FF data for Ottawa-Carleton with census data. The overall population estimate for the region was 98% of the census figure. Equivalent figures were 94% for central cities, 98% for suburbs and 122% for rural areas. The T1FF underestimated the population of children (89%) and seniors (93%). Population estimates for smaller neighbourhoods were poorer, some being wrong by a factor of more than two. The errors are probably due to postal code conversion. The T1FF provides fairly accurate estimates of the population of larger areas, and can be much more current than census data. It is less accurate for smaller areas, offers a limited range of variables, does not specify gender for children, and is fairly expensive. Health units with a major commitment to needs-based planning should consider using the T1FF for denominator data, despite its limitations.
PubMed ID
7895217 View in PubMed
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User-experience surveys with maternity services: a randomized comparison of two data collection models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123549
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2012 Aug;24(4):433-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Oyvind Andresen Bjertnaes
Hilde Hestad Iversen
Author Affiliation
Department for Quality Measurement and Patient Safety, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Boks 7004 St Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway. oan@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2012 Aug;24(4):433-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - economics - methods
Electronic Mail - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Maternal health services
Norway
Postal Service - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
To compare two ways of combining postal and electronic data collection for a maternity services user-experience survey.
Cross-sectional survey.
Maternity services in Norway.
All women who gave birth at a university hospital in Norway between 1 June and 27 July 2010.
Patients were randomized into the following groups (n= 752): Group A, who were posted questionnaires with both electronic and paper response options for both the initial and reminder postal requests; and Group B, who were posted questionnaires with an electronic response option for the initial request, and both electronic and paper response options for the reminder postal request.
Response rate, the amount of difference in background variables between respondents and non-respondents, main study results and estimated cost-effectiveness.
The final response rate was significantly higher in Group A (51.9%) than Group B (41.1%). None of the background variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group A, while two variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group B. None of the 11 user-experience scales differed significantly between Groups A and B. The estimated costs per response for the forthcoming national survey was ?11.7 for data collection Model A and ?9.0 for Model B.
The model with electronic-only response option in the first request had lowest response rate. However, this model performed equal to the other model on non-response bias and better on estimated cost-effectiveness, and is the better of the two models in large-scale user experiences surveys with maternity services.
PubMed ID
22687704 View in PubMed
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