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269 records – page 1 of 27.

4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997

AAA releases results of first anatomy salary/faculty survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182749
Source
Anat Rec B New Anat. 2003 Dec;275(1):181
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 performance measures on cardiac rehabilitation for referral to and delivery of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention services endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, Inter-American Heart Foundation, National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161050
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Oct 2;50(14):1400-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2007

Advancing care for traumatic brain injury: findings from the IMPACT studies and perspectives on future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106604
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrew I R Maas
Gordon D Murray
Bob Roozenbeek
Hester F Lingsma
Isabella Butcher
Gillian S McHugh
James Weir
Juan Lu
Ewout W Steyerberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. Electronic address: andrew.maas@uza.be.
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Disease Management
Europe
Forecasting
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
International Cooperation
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods - standards
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Research Design
Symptom Assessment - standards
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Research in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is challenging for several reasons; in particular, the heterogeneity between patients regarding causes, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. Advances in basic science have failed to translate into successful clinical treatments, and the evidence underpinning guideline recommendations is weak. Because clinical research has been hampered by non-standardised data collection, restricted multidisciplinary collaboration, and the lack of sensitivity of classification and efficacy analyses, multidisciplinary collaborations are now being fostered. Approaches to deal with heterogeneity have been developed by the IMPACT study group. These approaches can increase statistical power in clinical trials by up to 50% and are also relevant to other heterogeneous neurological diseases, such as stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage. Rather than trying to limit heterogeneity, we might also be able to exploit it by analysing differences in treatment and outcome between countries and centres in comparative effectiveness research. This approach has great potential to advance care in patients with TBI.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1132-324139679
PubMed ID
24139680 View in PubMed
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Ageism in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181010
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2004 Mar;19(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Erdman B Palmore
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Aggin adn Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ebp@geri.duke.edu
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2004 Mar;19(1):41-6
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Prejudice
Prevalence
United States
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of ageism in Canada and the United States, in Canada, the Ageism Survey was published in the CARPnews Report on Ageism, and in the United States, the Survey was administered to a convenience sample and published in the Center Report and Fifty Plus. Most respondents in both countries perceived ageism as frequent, but it was reported more often in Canada than in the United States. If the Ageism Survey is used to measure the prevalence of ageism among various groups and countries, we can develop an "epidemiology of ageism" and begin to reduce ageism.
PubMed ID
15032226 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic beverage type, recall period effects and functional disability: evidence from the 1983 NHIS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228954
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1990 Jun;25(3):257-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
R G Laforge
G D Williams
D A Parker
T C Harford
Author Affiliation
Brown University, Providence, RI.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1990 Jun;25(3):257-72
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Alcoholic Beverages - classification
Beer
Canada
Data Collection - instrumentation - methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Memory
Mental Recall
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
United States
Wine
Abstract
To replicate a Canada Health Survey (CHS) study that found beer drinking was associated with lower morbidity, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data for 19,462 persons were used to examine associations between functional disability and beverage specific ethanol consumption. A functional disability index consisting of morbidity and symptom coping events reported for 2 weeks prior to the NHIS interview was constructed. Alcohol consumption was reported for the same period as disability (coincident recall), or for the 2 weeks prior to the respondent's last drink during the past year (antecedent recall). The analysis controlled for confounders using direct standardization and multiple logistic regression. The results of this investigation were not consistent with the CHS study. Former drinkers and antecedent recall drinkers reported greater disability rates than either non-drinkers or coincident recall drinkers. Antecedent recall drinkers exhibiting a preference for beer and wine were, respectively, 40 and 80 percent more likely to be disabled than non-drinkers. Further, this study found no evidence of a protective effect among any subgroup of drinkers. The finding of a significant interaction between alcohol consumption and alcohol recall period suggests that epidemiologic studies should give greater attention to the classification of drinker groups by proximity of alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
2347290 View in PubMed
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Allergen immunotherapy practice patterns: a worldwide survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124082
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Jun;108(6):454-459.e7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Punita Ponda
Sima Mithani
Yelena Kopyltsova
Cristina Sison
Payel Gupta
Désirée Larenas
Vincent R Bonagura
Author Affiliation
North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, 865 Northern Boulevard, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. pponda@nshs.edu
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Jun;108(6):454-459.e7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Asthma - immunology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection
Desensitization, Immunologic - methods
Drug Administration Schedule
Europe
Female
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Pollen - immunology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - immunology - therapy
United States
Abstract
Allergists around the world have different practice styles when administering subcutaneous aeroallergen immunotherapy (IT) in peak pollen seasons, especially when changing doses or frequency of IT. The Immunotherapy practice parameters do not specifically address this issue.
Given the paucity of good data about adjustment of allergen immunotherapy during the pollen seasons, we examined whether a significant difference is present in the way allergists administer immunotherapy during allergy seasons.
To quantify the practice styles of allergists who are members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), a self-reported electronic survey was disseminated in September 2010 with the help of the AAAAI Needs Assessment Committee. The responses were tallied and analyzed according to demographic information.
A total of 1,201 allergists in the AAAAI responded to the survey. Most responders practice in an urban or suburban nonacademic practice in the United States and have been in practice for more than 10 years. The size of their practice was variable. Those in practice for more than 10 years were more likely to adjust the dose and frequency of immunotherapy in pollen seasons.
This survey highlights the differences in the practice styles of AAAAI member allergists, and these differences may be associated with their demographic characteristics. Given the wide variability in how allergists adjust dose and frequency of immunotherapy during pollen seasons, establishing guidelines regarding this routine dilemma might help standardize the delivery of treatment to patients.
PubMed ID
22626600 View in PubMed
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All payer, single payer, managed care, no payer: patients' perspectives in three nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213503
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1996;15(2):254-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Donelan
R J Blendon
J. Benson
R. Leitman
H. Taylor
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1996;15(2):254-65
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Fee-for-Service Plans
Female
Germany, West
Humans
Internationality
Male
Managed Care Programs
Middle Aged
National health programs - organization & administration
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Random Allocation
Single-Payer System
United States
Abstract
We present data on patients' experiences with access to and cost and quality of health services in the United States, Canada, and Germany. In general, patients report favorably about their care. U.S. respondents report more problems with access to care, even controlling for the severe problems of the uninsured. Differences in managed care versus fee-for-service plans in the United States mirror some of the problems observed in international comparisons--access to specialists and tests and waiting times for and quality of some services. Different cost containment strategies have measurable effects on patients' perspectives, particularly among patients who are sicker.
PubMed ID
8690382 View in PubMed
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269 records – page 1 of 27.