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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
factors. Second, these results and the specific m ethodology employed are potentially only representative of the Alaska population and Alaska data sets. Variation in state data collection systems and hospital coding practices, as well as indigenous populations and geographical makeup, could impact
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Finland--baseline data from the FINMONICA AMI register in 1983-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223821
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
J. Tuomilehto
M. Arstila
E. Kaarsalo
J. Kankaanpää
M. Ketonen
K. Kuulasmaa
S. Lehto
H. Miettinen
H. Mustaniemi
P. Palomäki
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Data Collection - methods - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Space-Time Clustering
Time Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) register of the FINMONICA study, the Finnish part of the WHO-coordinated multinational MONICA project, operates in the provinces of North Karelia and Kuopio in eastern Finland and in Turku, Loimaa and in communities around Loimaa in southwestern Finland. The AMI register serves as an instrument for the assessment of trends in mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) and of the incidence and attack rates of AMI among 25-64-year-old residents of the study areas. This report describes the methods used in the FINMONICA AMI register and the findings during the first 3 years of the study, in 1983-1985. The criteria of the multinational WHO MONICA project were used in the classification of fatal events and in the diagnosis of non-fatal definite AMI, but based on the experience within the FINMONICA study, stricter diagnostic criteria than those originally described in the WHO MONICA protocol were used for non-fatal possible AMI. This led to a marked improvement in the comparability of the data from the three study areas with regard to the incidence and attack rates of non-fatal AMI. During the 3-year period the total number of registered events was 6266 among men and 2092 among women. Among men the incidence and attack rates of AMI and mortality from CHD were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland. Also among women the incidence and attack rates of AMI were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland, whereas there was no regional difference in mortality from CHD among women. The mortality findings of the FINMONICA AMI Register were in good agreement with the official CHD mortality statistics of Finland.
Notes
Erratum In: Eur Heart J 1992 Aug;13(8):1153
PubMed ID
1618197 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings in Iceland: a prospective nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86765
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kristinsson Jakob
Palsson Runolfur
Gudjonsdottir Gudborg A
Blondal Margret
Gudmundsson Sigurdur
Snook Curtis P
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Child
Child, Preschool
Circadian Rhythm
Counseling - methods
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hazardous Substances - classification - poisoning
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Poison Control Centers - utilization
Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.
PubMed ID
18259960 View in PubMed
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Adolescent occasional smokers, a target group for smoking cessation? the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study, Norway, 1995-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67449
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Dec;31(6):682-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
T L Holmen
E. Barrett-Connor
J. Holmen
L. Bjermer
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Community Medicine Research Unit, Verdal, Norway. verdalfh@online.no
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Dec;31(6):682-90
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - trends
Smoking Cessation - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adolescent smokers are often unsuccessful in quitting and difficult to retain in cessation programs. In health promotion, focusing on the right target groups is essential. Aim. The aim was to examine if adolescent occasional smokers differ from daily smokers, and if possible differences could be useful for targeted smoking cessation programs. METHODS: Ninety-one percent of all teenagers attending junior high or high schools participated in a cross-sectional study, conducted in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, 1995-1997, including 8,460 students 13-18 years old. Information on smoking habits, education, after school activities, and parents was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: Fifty-four percent of boys and 57% of girls had tried at least one cigarette. Of these, 36% of boys and 41% of girls were current smokers, half of whom reported occasional smoking. Students who had quit smoking had more often been occasional than daily smokers. Compared to daily smokers, occasional smokers participated in higher academic courses, were more engaged in organized activities and sports, had been drunk less often, and had better family role models. CONCLUSION: Differences support potential utility of focusing on occasional smokers as a special target group in smoking cessation programs.
PubMed ID
11133335 View in PubMed
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Allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning for advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma in Sweden: high incidence of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139993
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2011 Jun;46(6):870-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
J E Johansson
M. Remberger
V Lj Lazarevic
H. Hallböök
A. Wahlin
E. Kimby
G. Juliusson
H. Omar
H. Hägglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Hematology and Coagulation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. jan-erik.j.johansson@vgregion.se
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2011 Jun;46(6):870-5
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Data Collection
Female
Graft vs Host Disease
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - methods
Hodgkin Disease - complications - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Transplantation Conditioning - adverse effects - methods
Transplantation, Autologous
Transplantation, Homologous
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Allogeneic transplantation after reduced intensity conditioning (allo-RIC) is a treatment option for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) relapsing after autologous transplantation. In all, 23 adult patients with HL underwent allo-RIC in Sweden between 2000 and 2007. The median number of previous treatment lines was five and 20 patients (87%) were previously autografted. TRM at 100 days and at 1 year was 13 and 22% respectively. Acute GVHD grades II-IV developed in 7 out of 23 patients (30%) and chronic GVHD in 10 out of 20 patients at risk (50%). The OS and EFS at three years was 59 and 27%, respectively. Four patients (17%) developed post transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) after a median time of 55 days (range 38-95); two of these patients later died. The study confirmed that allo-RIC is feasible, but associated with a substantial relapse rate: only 20% of the patients were still alive 7 years after the transplant. A finding of high incidence of PTLD needs to be confirmed in a larger trial that includes patients with non-HL and CLL.
PubMed ID
20956959 View in PubMed
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Analysis of simultaneous space-time clusters of Campylobacter spp. in humans and in broiler flocks using a multiple dataset approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140580
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Malin E Jonsson
Berit Tafjord Heier
Madelaine Norström
Merete Hofshagen
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Department for Health Surveillance, POB 750 Sentrum, 0106 Oslo, Norway. malin.jonsson@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Chickens
Cluster analysis
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology - veterinary
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Monte Carlo Method
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Registries
Seasons
Time Factors
Zoonoses
Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most frequently reported zoonosis in the EU and the epidemiology of sporadic campylobacteriosis, especially the routes of transmission, is to a great extent unclear. Poultry easily become colonised with Campylobacter spp., being symptom-less intestinal carriers. Earlier it was estimated that internationally between 50% and 80% of the cases could be attributed to chicken as a reservoir. In a Norwegian surveillance programme all broiler flocks under 50 days of age were tested for Campylobacter spp. The aim of the current study was to identify simultaneous local space-time clusters each year from 2002 to 2007 for human cases of campylobacteriosis and for broiler flocks testing positive for Campylobacter spp. using a multivariate spatial scan statistic method. A cluster occurring simultaneously in humans and broilers could indicate the presence of common factors associated with the dissemination of Campylobacter spp. for both humans and broilers.
Local space-time clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. occurring simultaneously were identified in all investigated years. All clusters but one were identified from May to August. Some municipalities were included in clusters all years.
The simultaneous occurrence of clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. combined with the knowledge that poultry meat has a nation-wide distribution indicates that campylobacteriosis cases might also be caused by other risk factors than consumption and handling of poultry meat.Broiler farms that are positive could contaminate the environment with further spread to new broiler farms or to humans living in the area and local environmental factors, such as climate, might influence the spread of Campylobacter spp. in an area. Further studies to clarify the role of such factors are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20860801 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of Lyme disease in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14321
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 16;333(20):1319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1995
Author
J. Berglund
R. Eitrem
K. Ornstein
A. Lindberg
A. Ringér
H. Elmrud
M. Carlsson
A. Runehagen
C. Svanborg
R. Norrby
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 16;333(20):1319-27
Date
Nov-16-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Insect Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Ixodes
Lyme Disease - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne infection in some temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. However, for most areas of endemic disease reliable epidemiologic data are sparse. METHODS. Over a one-year period, we conducted a prospective, population-based survey of cases of Lyme disease in southern Sweden. The diagnosis was made on the basis of the presence of erythema migrans at least 5 cm in diameter or characteristic clinical manifestations such as arthritis, neuroborreliosis, and carditis. RESULTS. We identified 1471 patients with Lyme disease, for an overall annual incidence of 69 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence varied markedly according to geographic region, and there were several areas where disease was widely prevalent. The incidence varied according to age, with the highest rates among people 5 to 9 and 60 to 74 years of age, but not according to sex. The most frequent clinical manifestation was erythema migrans (seen in 77 percent of all cases), followed by neuroborreliosis (16 percent) and arthritis (7 percent). Carditis was rare. A preceding tick bite was reported by 79 percent of the patients. Bites in the head and neck region were more common among children than among adults and were associated with an increased risk of neuroborreliosis. CONCLUSIONS. Lyme disease is very common in southern Sweden, with a relatively high frequency of neurologic complications and arthritis. With the exception of the low incidence of carditis, the pattern of disease we found in Sweden was similar to that reported in the United States.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1996 Mar 21;334(12):8038592568
PubMed ID
7566023 View in PubMed
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An observational study of protective equipment use among in-line skaters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204168
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
L. Warda
S. Harlos
T P Klassen
M E Moffatt
N. Buchan
V L Koop
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. lwarda@escape.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Protective Devices - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sex Distribution
Skating - injuries
Abstract
To describe the patterns of protective equipment use by in-line skaters in Winnipeg, Manitoba and nearby rural communities.
In-line skaters were observed for three months in 1996 at 190 urban and 30 rural sites selected using a formal sampling scheme. Age, gender, protective equipment use, skating companions, correct helmet use, and use of headphones were recorded.
Altogether 123 in-line skaters were observed at 61 sites, including one rural site. No skaters were observed at the remaining sites. There were 37 adults and 86 children; 56% were male. Helmet use was 12.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4% to 18.0%), wrist guard use was 16.3% (95% CI = 9.7% to 22.8%), knee pad use was 9.8% (95% CI = 5.2% to 16.4%), and elbow pad use was 7.3% (95% CI = 3.4% to 13.4%). Children were more likely to wear a helmet than teens 12-19 years of age (relative risk (RR) = 30, 95% CI = 4.01 to 225). Adults were more likely to wear wrist guards than children (RR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.87 to 9.94). No gender differences were found. Incorrect helmet use was documented in four skaters; three skaters were wearing headphones.
Low rates of protective equipment use were documented in our region, significantly lower than those reported in the literature. Barriers to equipment use are not known, and should be examined by further study. In-line skating safety programs should be developed, promoted, and evaluated. Teens should be targeted for future preventive efforts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9788090 View in PubMed
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An overview of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191052
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a multicenter, population-based cohort study of dementia with a sample of 10,263 participants aged 65 or over. Field work began in 1991, and a follow-up study was undertaken in 1996-97. The present article describes the origins and objectives of the study, provides an overview of its design, organization, and data collection methods, and offers a brief summary of the main results.
PubMed ID
11892976 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.