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An overview of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191052
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:7-18
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a multicenter, population-based cohort study of dementia with a sample of 10,263 participants aged 65 or over. Field work began in 1991, and a follow-up study was undertaken in 1996-97. The present article describes the origins and objectives of the study, provides an overview of its design, organization, and data collection methods, and offers a brief summary of the main results.
PubMed ID
11892976 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Study of Health and Aging: organizational lessons from a national, multicenter, epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191057
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Rockwood
C. Wolfson
I. McDowell
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:233-7
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dementia - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Male
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging was a large, multidisciplinary, national core study--with a number of "add-on" investigations--of the epidemiology of dementia and the health of older people. This structure was a fiscally prudent way to balance between mandated and investigator-initiated inquiry. In hindsight, several important features of the study would be repeated. Future studies might profitably consider a longer funding period for analysis, and a more strategic approach to in-depth, supplementary studies.
PubMed ID
11892971 View in PubMed
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Correlates of nonparticipation in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191054
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B. Helliwell
R. Aylesworth
I. McDowell
M. Baumgarten
E. Sykes
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:49-56
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Correlates of nonparticipation in the community interview component of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging and their impact on bias in the results were analyzed. Characteristics of study subjects, their habitats, and encouragement techniques were analyzed to identify correlates of variation in response rates across the 18 study centers. Refusal rates from 14% to 41% varied by age, gender, city size, number of subjects and length of time for enrollment, and method of approach. Cognitively impaired subjects had higher refusal rates which affected prevalence estimates. At one study site, efforts to "convert" subjects who initially refused to participate in the survey were successful with 26% of those who were recontacted.
PubMed ID
11892974 View in PubMed
Less detail

Data collected in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191056
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:29-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
M. Stewart
B. Kristjansson
E. Sykes
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:29-39
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging collected data focusing on the epidemiology of dementia, using interviews and questionnaires, clinical and neuropsychological examinations, physical measurements and blood collection, and access to public records such as death certificates, from people 65 and over in community (N = 9,008) institutional settings (N = 1,255). The study produced 12 data sets, including community health interviews, clinical and neuropsychological assessments, risk factor questionnaires, and caregiver interviews. This report describes the data collection and processing procedures, summarizes the content of each data set, and outlines the information collected in sufficient detail to permit its suitability for secondary analyses to be scrutinized.
PubMed ID
11892972 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of screening errors and differential mortality on the estimation of the incidence of dementia in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191067
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:143-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G. Hill
I. MacNeill
R. Aylesworth
I. McDowell
W. Forbes
J. Kozak
Author Affiliation
Canadian Study of Health and Aging, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:143-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - classification - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging produced an estimate of the incidence of dementia among elderly Canadians by following up, after 5 years, the undemented found in an initial prevalence survey. Initial and follow-up estimates could be biased by false-negative error in the screening tool used for subjects living in the community, and by erroneous classification of subjects who died in the interim. Here, we use a deterministic model to quantify those possible biases. We conclude that, using the estimates of the errors from control samples, the incidence among community subjects would be overestimated by 15%, and the incidence among the institutional subjects would be underestimated by 37%. The overall incidence would be underestimated by 14%. Most of the bias can be attributed to inaccuracies in the classification of deaths.
PubMed ID
11892961 View in PubMed
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Estimating antemortem cognitive status of deceased subjects in a longitudinal study of dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191048
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Stewart
I. McDowell
G. Hill
R. Aylesworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:99-106
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Death Certificates
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There was a five-year delay between the two waves of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging during which 2,982 participants died. Their cognitive status before death should be taken into account in estimating the incidence of dementia in the cohort. Information concerning antemortem cognitive status was available from death certificates and from an interview with a close relative of the decedent at the CSHA-2 follow-up. The interview included a direct question on whether the person had been diagnosed with dementia and questions covering cognitive signs and symptoms from which we formed an algorithm to predict probability of dementia. These sources of information were validated using a small sample of study participants who died within five months of undergoing the CSHA clinical examination. Sensitivity of the death certificate and the question regarding diagnosis of dementia was low (33% and 44%), although their specificity was very high. Accordingly, we combined these with the predictive algorithm to form an overall estimate of the probability of antemortem dementia. This raised the sensitivity to 82% (specificity 93%).
PubMed ID
11892980 View in PubMed
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Study organization in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191055
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
B. Helliwell
E. Sykes
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:41-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging was a complex undertaking that faced management challenges not encountered by smaller-scale projects. The study followed 10,263 elderly people in 18 study centers spanning six time zones; it was administered in two languages, and over 70 investigators were involved. The data collected from each participant were not fixed, but varied according to the results of earlier testing. The data could include a screening interview, a self-completed risk factor questionnaire, an interview with a relative, a clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, blood samples, and neuroimaging. This report describes the approach taken to organize the study, to track participants, and to monitor adherence to the study protocol. It also describes the human organizational aspects, including systems for staff training, for communicating among study centers, and for coordinating the publication of results. The discussion proposes some guiding principles for administering multicenter studies.
PubMed ID
11892973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Study sampling in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191061
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. McDowell
R. Aylesworth
M. Stewart
G. Hill
J. Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001;13 Supp 1:19-28
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The Canadian Study of Health and Aging drew representative samples of people aged 65 or over from the community and institutions across Canada. The sample was designed to provide regional and national prevalence estimates for dementia by age and sex. Thirty-six sampling areas were used in a stratified cluster design with optimal allocation; sampling weights were developed to provide population estimates. The sample included 9,008 people aged 65 or over from the community, and 1,255 from institutions. This report describes the sampling procedures, the methods used to recruit people to the study and participation rates, the characteristics of the resulting sample, and the way in which sample weights should be used.
PubMed ID
11892967 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.