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149 records – page 1 of 15.

About the concept of the "dangerous individual" in 19th-century legal psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248925
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1978
Author
M. Foucault
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Date
Feb-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dangerous Behavior
Europe
Forensic Psychiatry - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Terminology as Topic
Violence
PubMed ID
374291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
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Alaska governor vetoes HIV criminal exposure bill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2995
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1998
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Date
Jul-24-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Criminal Law
Dangerous Behavior
Female
HIV Infections - transmission
Humans
Male
Public Health
Self Disclosure
Sexual Behavior
State Government
Tissue Donors
Abstract
On June 19, 1998, Alaskan governor Tony Knowles vetoed legislation that would have made it a felony to knowingly expose a person to HIV. Senate Bill 17 would have made criminal transmission of HIV a Class B felony, carrying a penalty of up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $50,000. The legislation would have applied to those who knowingly expose others to HIV through sex or needle-sharing without informing their partners. The bill also would have made it illegal for people who know they are HIV positive to donate organs, semen, or ova.
PubMed ID
11365577 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of Think First Saskatchewan: a head and spinal cord injury prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186006
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marni L Wesner
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic. mwesner@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):115-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Child Behavior
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dangerous Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
School Health Services
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To identify youth behaviour with regards to injury prevention, to assess the awareness of severity and susceptibility to brain and spinal cord injury, and to evaluate the impact of the Think First Saskatchewan school visit program on students' knowledge of brain and spinal cord injury prevention.
A controlled, pre- and post-test design, self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,257 grade 6 and 7 students. Descriptive statistics and chi-square were used for data analysis. P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant.
Saskatchewan youth participate in activities that put them at risk for brain and spinal cord injury. The Think First Saskatchewan school visit program statistically improved self-reported knowledge of the students receiving the Think First message.
Think First Saskatchewan is a brain and spinal cord injury prevention program that significantly improves youth knowledge pertaining to injury prevention. Further evaluation of the program to include a more delayed survey of retention of knowledge, changes to behaviour, and reduction of brain and spinal cord injury are necessary.
PubMed ID
12675167 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1982 Apr;27(3):188-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1982
Author
J M Bradford
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1982 Apr;27(3):188-93
Date
Apr-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dangerous Behavior
Family Characteristics
Female
Firesetting Behavior - psychology
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Motivation
Ontario
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Psychiatric, psychosocial and medicolegal issues related to 34 arsonists and 50 controls are described. Arson was most frequently committed by males who suffered from personality disorder, mental retardation or depressive neurosis. Poor school and work records also characterized their background when compared to the control forensic psychiatric patients. The offence more frequently occurred within a one mile radius of their own home in residential property. Revenge or a "cry for help" was the most frequent motivation for the firesetting activity.
PubMed ID
7093871 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1986 Jun;82(6):19-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986

Association between neighbourhood socioeconomic characteristics and high-risk injection behaviour amongst injection drug users living in inner and other city areas in Montréal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152348
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Jan;21(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Mélissa Généreux
Julie Bruneau
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Community Medicine Residency Program, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Jan;21(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dangerous Behavior
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - blood - psychology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Area-level socioeconomic conditions are associated with epidemic rates of viral hepatitis and HIV amongst urban injection drug users (IDUs), but whether specific socioeconomic markers are uniformly related to IDU outcomes across different urban environments is unclear. We evaluated whether injection behaviour is differentially related to neighbourhood socioeconomic characteristics for IDUs in inner city vs. surrounding urban areas.
The study population was 468 active IDUs on the Island of Montréal. Neighbourhoods were represented as 500m radius buffers around individual IDU dwelling places. High-risk injection behaviour (HRIB) was defined dichotomously. Relations between neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage (percentage households below low-income cutoff), neighbourhood educational attainment (percentage adults with university degree), and HRIB were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Stratified analyses were conducted for inner city IDUs (n=219), and those in surrounding areas (n=249).
Similar proportions of IDUs in inner city and surrounding areas reported HRIB. Neighbourhood socioeconomic characteristics were not associated with HRIB for IDUs in surrounding areas. For inner city IDUs, those in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods were more likely to practice HRIB (OR 4.34; 95% CI 1.15-16.35). Conversely, inner city IDUs residing in lower educational attainment neighbourhoods had a lower odds of HRIB (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.21-0.80).
HRIB did not vary according to urban environment but for inner-city IDUs was differentially related to socioeconomic markers. Associations between HRIB and neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and lower educational attainment, positive and negative, respectively, indicate that adverse socioeconomic circumstances are not related to a uniformly greater likelihood of HRIB.
PubMed ID
19250813 View in PubMed
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Association of perinatal events, epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222616
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Dec;67(12):1459-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P. Rantakallio
M. Koiranen
J. Möttönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Dec;67(12):1459-61
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Brain Injuries - complications
Dangerous Behavior
Epilepsy - complications
Female
Finland
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The association of perinatal events, childhood epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency was studied prospectively in a geographically defined population of 5966 males in northern Finland. Those who had obtained a criminal record up to the age of 22 years, totalling 355, or 6.0%, were defined as delinquents. The incidence of delinquency was not increased in males with a birth weight less than 2500 g or greater than 4000 g, preterm births
Notes
Cites: Dis Nerv Syst. 1977 Nov;38(11):907-8913225
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1988 Jan;2(1):59-882976931
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1985 Dec;39(4):353-64086968
Cites: Neurology. 1980 Mar;30(3):304-77189030
Cites: Am J Ment Defic. 1986 Jan;90(4):380-72936240
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 1987 Mar;15(2):75-843595479
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1985 Jul;144(2):149-514043124
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1962 Mar;118:781-9413917550
PubMed ID
1489225 View in PubMed
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The associations between health risk behaviours and suicidal ideation and attempts in a nationally representative sample of young adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160280
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;52(10):666-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tracie O Afifi
Brian J Cox
Laurence Y Katz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;52(10):666-74
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Dangerous Behavior
Demography
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine associations between health risk behaviours and suicidal ideation and attempts in Canadian adolescents aged 12 to 13 years. Young adolescents think about and attempt suicide. However, most existing research on suicide has been conducted on individuals aged 15 years and older.
The present study examined a nationally representative Canadian sample of adolescents aged 12 to 13 years (n=2090). Health risk behaviours included disruptive (shoplifting, physical fighting, damaging property, fighting with a weapon, carrying a knife, and gambling), sexual (petting below the waist and sexual intercourse), and substance use behaviours (smoking cigarettes, consuming alcohol, marijuana or hash, and glue or solvents). Unadjusted and adjusted (for all significant health risk behaviour and psychiatric symptoms) models were tested.
All health risk behaviours were common among male and female adolescents. In unadjusted models, almost all health risk behaviours were associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among adolescent boys. In adjusted models, only damaging property, sexual intercourse, and smoking cigarettes remained statistically associated with suicidal ideation, while smoking cigarettes and using marijuana or hash remained statistically associated with suicide attempts among adolescent boys. All health risk behaviours were statistically associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among female adolescents in unadjusted models. In adjusted models, only carrying a knife remained statistically associated with suicidal ideation, while shoplifting and gambling remained statistically associated with suicide attempts among adolescent girls.
Health risk behaviours among young adolescents are associated with suicidal ideation and attempts among young adolescents. Recognizing health risk behaviours among young adolescents may be one means of understanding who among them is at increased risk of suicidality.
PubMed ID
18020114 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):120-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Ojanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):120-30
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Dangerous Behavior
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Abstract
A study of attitudes towards mental patients was made using a questionnaire developed by Lehtinen and Väisänen. Five hundred and fourteen persons from different parts of Finland filled in the questionnaire. The attitudes were generally positive, although, as in other studies, the attitudes of those older and less educated were more negative compared with the other groups. This result was interpreted as a generational effect, which will vanish as the educational level of the population increases. The questionnaire also included questions about the attitudes and behaviour of 'other people'. The attitudes of 'other people' were thought to be very negative compared with one's own attitudes.
PubMed ID
1506136 View in PubMed
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149 records – page 1 of 15.