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Ache, pain, and discomfort: the reward for working with many cows and sows?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166311
Source
J Agromedicine. 2006;11(2):45-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Christina Kolstrup
Marianne Stål
Stefan Pinzke
Peter Lundqvist
Author Affiliation
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agricultural Biosystems and Technology, Alnarp, Sweden. christina.kolstrup@jbt.slu.se
Source
J Agromedicine. 2006;11(2):45-55
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Animal Husbandry - manpower - methods
Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Dairying - manpower - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The main purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of perceived symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among workers on large-scale dairy and pig farms in Sweden (herd size more than 300 cows and 450 sows) and to identify potential risk factors in the development of MSD. A study based on questionnaires was carried out among 42 workers on 10 large dairy farms and among 37 workers on 10 large pig farms in Southern Sweden during the autumn of 2002. Most importantly, the study showed that 86% of the dairy workers and 78% of the pig workers reported some kind of MSD during a period of 12 months prior to the study. The most frequently reported MSD among both the dairy and the pig workers were in the "upper extremities" (52% and 62%, respectively) especially in the shoulders and in "the back" (60% and 57%, respectively) especially in the lower back. Furthermore, being of short stature, doing repetitive work, working in awkward positions and being exposed to dust were significant risk factors in having MSD among the workers in this study. Thus, working with many cows and sows on large-scale farms in Sweden can be considered as a high risk job with regard to MSD.
PubMed ID
17135142 View in PubMed
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Acne and dairy products in adolescence: results from a Norwegian longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286570
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M. Ulvestad
E. Bjertness
F. Dalgard
J A Halvorsen
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - epidemiology
Adolescent
Animals
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acne is a very common skin condition, and it is of great interest to elucidate lifestyle factors that may contribute to its occurrence. In the last decade, the acne-diet connection has been brought back to credibility.
To examine whether high intakes of dairy products in early adolescence is associated with moderate to severe acne in later adolescence.
The study is a longitudinal, questionnaire-based population study of Norwegian adolescents. Students attending the 10th grade (15-16 years old) of compulsory schooling in Oslo in 2000-2001 and the 13th grade (18-19 years old) 3 years later, in 2004, were invited. Dairy product consumption was self-reported at age 15-16 and acne severity was self-assessed and reported at age 18-19.
The overall prevalence of moderate to severe acne was 13.9%. High intakes (=2 glasses per day) of full-fat dairy products were associated with moderate to severe acne. In boys with exclusively high intakes of full-fat dairy products, the odds ratio for acne was 4.81 (1.59-14.56). A high total intake of dairy products was associated with acne in girls (OR 1.80, 1.02-3.16). No significant associations were found between acne and intake of semi-skimmed or skimmed dairy products, and not with moderate intakes of any fat variety of dairy products.
This study shows association between high intakes of dairy products and acne in adolescence. Our findings support a hypothesis suggesting that dairy consumption may be a factor contributing to acne. The study is based on multiple hypothesis testing, and the methodological limitations must be considered when interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
27422392 View in PubMed
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Adding cows to the reference population makes a small dairy population competitive.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263440
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2014 Sep;97(9):5822-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
J R Thomasen
A C Sørensen
M S Lund
B. Guldbrandtsen
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2014 Sep;97(9):5822-32
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breeding - economics - methods
Cattle - genetics - growth & development
Dairying - economics - methods
Denmark
Female
Genomics - methods
Genotype
Male
Models, Genetic
Population Density
Reproducibility of Results
Selection, Genetic
Abstract
Small dairy breeds are challenged by low reliabilities of genomic prediction. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of including cows in the reference population for small dairy cattle populations with a limited number of sires in the reference population. Using detailed simulations, 2 types of scenarios for maintaining and updating the reference population over a period of 15yr were investigated: a turbo scheme exclusively using genotyped young bulls and a hybrid scheme with mixed use of genotyped young bulls and progeny-tested bulls. Two types of modifications were investigated: (1) number of progeny-tested bulls per year was tested at 6 levels: 15, 40, 60, 100, 250, and 500; and (2) each year, 2,000 first-lactation cows were randomly selected from the cow population for genotyping or, alternatively, an additional 2,000 first-lactation cows were randomly selected and typed in the first 2yr. The effects were evaluated in the 2 main breeding schemes. The breeding schemes were chosen to mimic options for the Danish Jersey cattle population. Evaluation criteria were annual monetary genetic gain, rate of inbreeding, reliability of genomic predictions, and variance of response. Inclusion of cows in the reference population increased monetary genetic gain and decreased the rate of inbreeding. The increase in genetic gain was larger for the turbo schemes with shorter generation intervals. The variance of response was generally higher in turbo schemes than in schemes using progeny-tested bulls. However, the risk was reduced by adding cows to the reference population. The annual genetic gain and the reliability of genomic predictions were slightly higher with more cows in the reference population. Inclusion of cows in the reference population is a rapid way to increase reliabilities of genomic predictions and hence increase genetic gain in a small population. An economic evaluation shows that genotyping of cows is a profitable investment.
PubMed ID
24996280 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue fatty acids present in dairy fat and risk of stroke: the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303048
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Mar; 58(2):529-539
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Anne Sofie Dam Laursen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Erik Berg Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. asdl@ph.au.dk.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Mar; 58(2):529-539
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - methods
Dietary Fats - analysis - metabolism
Fatty Acids - analysis - metabolism
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - metabolism
Abstract
The role of dairy fat for the risk of stroke is not yet clear. Adipose tissue reflects long-term fatty acid intake and metabolism. We, therefore, investigated associations for percentages of adipose tissue fatty acids, for which dairy products are a major source (12:0, 14:0, 14:1 cis-9, 15:0, 17:0, 18:1 trans-11 and 18:2 cis-9, trans-11), with incident total stroke and stroke subtypes.
We conducted a case-cohort study within the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort, including all incident stroke cases (n?=?2108) and a random sample of the total cohort (n?=?3186). The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue biopsies was determined by gas chromatography and specific fatty acids were expressed as percentage of total fatty acids. Stroke cases were identified in the Danish National Patient Registry and the diagnoses were individually verified.
We recorded 2108 stroke cases of which 1745 were ischemic, 249 were intracerebral hemorrhages and 102 were subarachnoid hemorrhages. We observed a lower rate of ischemic stroke for a higher adipose tissue percentage of 12:0, 14:0, 15:0, 17:0, 18:1 trans-11 and 18:2 cis-9, trans-11. Adipose tissue percentages of 15:0 and 18:1 trans-11 were also inversely associated with intracerebral hemorrhage, whereas no associations between the adipose tissue fatty acids and subarachnoid hemorrhage were observed. No associations between 14:1 cis-9 and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke were found.
Our results suggest that a larger percentage in adipose tissue of fatty acids for which dairy products are a major source is associated with a lower rate of ischemic stroke.
PubMed ID
29330661 View in PubMed
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Adult-type hypolactasia is not a predisposing factor for the early functional and structural changes of atherosclerosis: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159355
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Terho Lehtimäki
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Mika Kähönen
Jukka Hemminki
Vera Mikkilä
Marika Laaksonen
Leena Räsänen
Nina Mononen
Markus Juonala
Jukka Marniemi
Jorma Viikari
Olli Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Atherosclerosis Genetics, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Tampere University Hospital and the Medical School at the University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. terho.lehtimaki@uta.fi
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Dairy Products - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lactase - deficiency
Lactase-Phlorizin Hydrolase - genetics
Lactose Intolerance - complications - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Vasodilation
Abstract
Individuals suffering from ATH (adult-type hypolactasia), defined by the LCT (gene encoding lactase-phlorizin hydrolase) C/C(-13910) genotype (rs4988235), use less milk and dairy products and may have higher plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and lower triacylglycerol (triglyceride) concentrations than their counterparts without ATH. To investigate the effects of ATH status on the early markers of atherosclerosis, we examined its association with CIMT (carotid intima-media thickness), CAC (carotid artery compliance) and brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) in a young population-based cohort of otherwise healthy individuals. As part of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, we performed CIMT, CAC and FMD analyses, LCT C/T(-13910) genotyping and risk factor determination in 2109 young subjects 24-39 years of age (45% males) at the time of the examination. The consumption of both milk and dairy products was lowest and the consumption of alcohol highest in subjects with the C/C(-13910) genotype (P
PubMed ID
18194137 View in PubMed
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Analysis of behavioral changes in dairy cows associated with claw horn lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278333
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2016 Apr;99(4):2904-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
K. Nechanitzky
A. Starke
B. Vidondo
H. Müller
M. Reckardt
K. Friedli
A. Steiner
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2016 Apr;99(4):2904-14
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - diagnosis - psychology
Dairying - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Finland
Hoof and Claw - pathology
Lameness, Animal - diagnosis - psychology
Locomotion - physiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Detecting lame cows is important in improving animal welfare. Automated tools are potentially useful to enable identification and monitoring of lame cows. The goals of this study were to evaluate the suitability of various physiological and behavioral parameters to automatically detect lameness in dairy cows housed in a cubicle barn. Lame cows suffering from a claw horn lesion (sole ulcer or white line disease) of one claw of the same hind limb (n=32; group L) and 10 nonlame healthy cows (group C) were included in this study. Lying and standing behavior at night by tridimensional accelerometers, weight distribution between hind limbs by the 4-scale weighing platform, feeding behavior at night by the nose band sensor, and heart activity by the Polar device (Polar Electro Oy, Kempele, Finland) were assessed. Either the entire data set or parts of the data collected over a 48-h period were used for statistical analysis, depending upon the parameter in question. The standing time at night over 12 h and the limb weight ratio (LWR) were significantly higher in group C as compared with group L, whereas the lying time at night over 12 h, the mean limb difference (?weight), and the standard deviation (SD) of the weight applied on the limb taking less weight were significantly lower in group C as compared with group L. No significant difference was noted between the groups for the parameters of heart activity and feeding behavior at night. The locomotion score of cows in group L was positively correlated with the lying time and ?weight, whereas it was negatively correlated with LWR and SD. The highest sensitivity (0.97) for lameness detection was found for the parameter SD [specificity of 0.80 and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.84]. The highest specificity (0.90) for lameness detection was present for ?weight (sensitivity=0.78; AUC=0.88) and LWR (sensitivity=0.81; AUC=0.87). The model considering the data of SD together with lying time at night was the best predictor of cows being lame, accounting for 40% of the variation in the likelihood of a cow being lame (sensitivity=0.94; specificity=0.80; AUC=0.86). In conclusion, the data derived from the 4-scale-weighing platform, either alone or combined with the lying time at night over 12 h, represent the most valuable parameters for automated identification of lame cows suffering from a claw horn lesion of one individual hind limb.
PubMed ID
26874422 View in PubMed
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Analysis of enterotoxin production by Bacillus cereus from dairy products, food poisoning incidents and non-gastrointestinal infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75611
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P E Granum
S. Brynestad
J M Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Oslo.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacillus cereus - isolation & purification - metabolism - pathogenicity
Biological Assay - methods
Blotting, Western
Capillary Permeability - drug effects
Cold
Comparative Study
Dairy Products - microbiology - poisoning
Enterotoxins - analysis - biosynthesis
Evaluation Studies
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - etiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests - methods
Male
Norway
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Of 85 strains of Bacillus cereus isolated in Norway from dairy products, 59% were found to be enterotoxigenic, and 15% were psychrotrophic. Six of the isolates (7%) were identified as potential psychrotrophic food-poisoning strains as they were both enterotoxigenic and exhibited good growth at 6 degrees C. Enterotoxin production was detected using the Western immunoblot technique, and a commercially available reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA) assay (Unipath BCET-RPLA TD950). Both methods gave essentially the same results. In a separate study, the Western immunoblot and RPLA assays were used in a conjunction with the in vivo vascular permeability reaction (VPR) assay to determine enterotoxin production among 25 isolates of Bacillus cereus referred to the PHLS Food Hygiene Laboratory from incidents of diarrhoeal- and emetic-syndrome food poisoning and non-gastrointestinal infections. Eighty-four percent of these isolates were found to be enterotoxigenic by the Western immunoblot and the RPLA assays, and these results were in good agreement with those obtained by the VPR assay. In both studies, the BCET-RPLA kit proved to be a simple and reliable means for determining enterotoxin production by strains of Bacillus cereus.
PubMed ID
8466800 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of the dysentery epidemic process in Blagoveshchensk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228971
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
V K Kurganov
V V Krasnikov
O P Pischikova
E I Shmelev
V V Stepanenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Diptera
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology - transmission
Food Microbiology
Humans
Insect Vectors
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The retrospective analysis of dysentery morbidity in Blagoveshchensk for the period of 1960-1987 was made. The regularities linking general natural and biological factors triggering the epidemic process with dysentery morbidity among the population are emphasized. The study revealed that under the conditions of Blagoveshchensk dairy products were of major epidemic importance among factors contributing to the transmission of dysentery. Such a factor as flies also had a definite influence on the epidemic process of dysentery. Another risk factor was drinking water which influenced the epidemic process both directly and indirectly through dairy products and, probably, other foodstuffs. Reliable correlation between dysentery morbidity among the population and the quality of dairy products, tap water and the number of flies was established.
PubMed ID
2220218 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of late-term abortions in dairy cattle in Denmark, July 2000-August 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80735
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Dec 18;77(3-4):215-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-2006
Author
Carpenter Tim E
Chrièl Mariann
Andersen Mette M
Wulfson Liana
Jensen Astrid M
Houe Hans
Greiner Matthias
Author Affiliation
Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. tecarpenter@ucdavis.edu
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Dec 18;77(3-4):215-29
Date
Dec-18-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Bacterial Infections - complications - veterinary
Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease - complications
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - diagnosis
Coccidiosis - complications - veterinary
Dairying - methods
Denmark
Female
Incidence
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Seasons
Space-Time Clustering
Abstract
Abortion in dairy cows in well-managed dairies is not common but differences have been reported probably due to variation in animal health, nutrition and management, as well as difficulties in observing the aborted material. A 38-month study of 507 large Danish dairy herds revealed 3354 late-term abortions and 224,419 calvings were recorded. During the study period, a total of 3717 submissions were made to the Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research (DFVF). A broad spectrum of abortive agents was isolated but none were found to be statistically associated with abortions. The number of abortions in a month on a dairy was significantly (P0.17) or spatial scan tests (P>0.23). Ederer-Myers-Mantel test was applied to 3 years of data on the highest aborting dairies and showed that July had nearly double the expected number of maximum monthly abortions (P
PubMed ID
16962189 View in PubMed
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448 records – page 1 of 45.