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Acne and dairy products in adolescence: results from a Norwegian longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286570
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M. Ulvestad
E. Bjertness
F. Dalgard
J A Halvorsen
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - epidemiology
Adolescent
Animals
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acne is a very common skin condition, and it is of great interest to elucidate lifestyle factors that may contribute to its occurrence. In the last decade, the acne-diet connection has been brought back to credibility.
To examine whether high intakes of dairy products in early adolescence is associated with moderate to severe acne in later adolescence.
The study is a longitudinal, questionnaire-based population study of Norwegian adolescents. Students attending the 10th grade (15-16 years old) of compulsory schooling in Oslo in 2000-2001 and the 13th grade (18-19 years old) 3 years later, in 2004, were invited. Dairy product consumption was self-reported at age 15-16 and acne severity was self-assessed and reported at age 18-19.
The overall prevalence of moderate to severe acne was 13.9%. High intakes (=2 glasses per day) of full-fat dairy products were associated with moderate to severe acne. In boys with exclusively high intakes of full-fat dairy products, the odds ratio for acne was 4.81 (1.59-14.56). A high total intake of dairy products was associated with acne in girls (OR 1.80, 1.02-3.16). No significant associations were found between acne and intake of semi-skimmed or skimmed dairy products, and not with moderate intakes of any fat variety of dairy products.
This study shows association between high intakes of dairy products and acne in adolescence. Our findings support a hypothesis suggesting that dairy consumption may be a factor contributing to acne. The study is based on multiple hypothesis testing, and the methodological limitations must be considered when interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
27422392 View in PubMed
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Adult-type hypolactasia is not a predisposing factor for the early functional and structural changes of atherosclerosis: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159355
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Terho Lehtimäki
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Mika Kähönen
Jukka Hemminki
Vera Mikkilä
Marika Laaksonen
Leena Räsänen
Nina Mononen
Markus Juonala
Jukka Marniemi
Jorma Viikari
Olli Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Atherosclerosis Genetics, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Tampere University Hospital and the Medical School at the University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. terho.lehtimaki@uta.fi
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2008 Nov;115(9):265-71
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - ultrasonography
Dairy Products - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lactase - deficiency
Lactase-Phlorizin Hydrolase - genetics
Lactose Intolerance - complications - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Vasodilation
Abstract
Individuals suffering from ATH (adult-type hypolactasia), defined by the LCT (gene encoding lactase-phlorizin hydrolase) C/C(-13910) genotype (rs4988235), use less milk and dairy products and may have higher plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein) and lower triacylglycerol (triglyceride) concentrations than their counterparts without ATH. To investigate the effects of ATH status on the early markers of atherosclerosis, we examined its association with CIMT (carotid intima-media thickness), CAC (carotid artery compliance) and brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) in a young population-based cohort of otherwise healthy individuals. As part of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, we performed CIMT, CAC and FMD analyses, LCT C/T(-13910) genotyping and risk factor determination in 2109 young subjects 24-39 years of age (45% males) at the time of the examination. The consumption of both milk and dairy products was lowest and the consumption of alcohol highest in subjects with the C/C(-13910) genotype (P
PubMed ID
18194137 View in PubMed
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Analysis of enterotoxin production by Bacillus cereus from dairy products, food poisoning incidents and non-gastrointestinal infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75611
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P E Granum
S. Brynestad
J M Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Oslo.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacillus cereus - isolation & purification - metabolism - pathogenicity
Biological Assay - methods
Blotting, Western
Capillary Permeability - drug effects
Cold
Comparative Study
Dairy Products - microbiology - poisoning
Enterotoxins - analysis - biosynthesis
Evaluation Studies
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - etiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests - methods
Male
Norway
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Of 85 strains of Bacillus cereus isolated in Norway from dairy products, 59% were found to be enterotoxigenic, and 15% were psychrotrophic. Six of the isolates (7%) were identified as potential psychrotrophic food-poisoning strains as they were both enterotoxigenic and exhibited good growth at 6 degrees C. Enterotoxin production was detected using the Western immunoblot technique, and a commercially available reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA) assay (Unipath BCET-RPLA TD950). Both methods gave essentially the same results. In a separate study, the Western immunoblot and RPLA assays were used in a conjunction with the in vivo vascular permeability reaction (VPR) assay to determine enterotoxin production among 25 isolates of Bacillus cereus referred to the PHLS Food Hygiene Laboratory from incidents of diarrhoeal- and emetic-syndrome food poisoning and non-gastrointestinal infections. Eighty-four percent of these isolates were found to be enterotoxigenic by the Western immunoblot and the RPLA assays, and these results were in good agreement with those obtained by the VPR assay. In both studies, the BCET-RPLA kit proved to be a simple and reliable means for determining enterotoxin production by strains of Bacillus cereus.
PubMed ID
8466800 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of the dysentery epidemic process in Blagoveshchensk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228971
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
V K Kurganov
V V Krasnikov
O P Pischikova
E I Shmelev
V V Stepanenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Diptera
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology - transmission
Food Microbiology
Humans
Insect Vectors
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The retrospective analysis of dysentery morbidity in Blagoveshchensk for the period of 1960-1987 was made. The regularities linking general natural and biological factors triggering the epidemic process with dysentery morbidity among the population are emphasized. The study revealed that under the conditions of Blagoveshchensk dairy products were of major epidemic importance among factors contributing to the transmission of dysentery. Such a factor as flies also had a definite influence on the epidemic process of dysentery. Another risk factor was drinking water which influenced the epidemic process both directly and indirectly through dairy products and, probably, other foodstuffs. Reliable correlation between dysentery morbidity among the population and the quality of dairy products, tap water and the number of flies was established.
PubMed ID
2220218 View in PubMed
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Are Food Advertisements Promoting More Unhealthy Foods and Beverages over Time? Evidence from Three Swedish Food Magazines, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279943
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andreas Håkansson
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Bread - adverse effects - economics
Consumer Behavior - economics
Dairy Products - adverse effects - economics
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - economics - ethnology
Food - adverse effects - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects - economics
Health Promotion - economics - trends
Health Transition
Healthy Diet - economics - trends
Humans
Nutritive Value
Periodicals as Topic - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Unhealthy food in advertising has been suggested as a mediator for the increase in diet-related illness. This study quantitatively investigates changes in food advertising between 1995 and 2014 in terms of food categories promoted, macronutrient content, and percentage of foods classified as heathy or unhealthy from a sample of 7,199 ads from three Swedish food magazines. With the exception of increased alcoholic beverage and decreased carbohydrate-rich-food promotion, no monotonic trends of increasingly unhealthy food advertisement are found. From these findings, it is argued that food magazine advertising is not a mediator of the adverse dietary trend.
PubMed ID
27880047 View in PubMed
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[A reply about milk porridge. Infant food is also a question of nutritional physiology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33286
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 May 26;96(21):2624-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1999

Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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Assessment of working conditions in a modern Russian milk processing plant from the aspect of occupational medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203226
Source
Croat Med J. 1999 Mar;40(1):93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L V Belova
I A Mishkich
G A Kresova
T A Liubomudrova
Author Affiliation
Saint-Petersburg State Medical Academy named after I. I. Mechnikov, Piskarevsky prospect, 47, St-Petersburg, 195067 Russia. maimulov@ag1268.spb.edu
Source
Croat Med J. 1999 Mar;40(1):93-8
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dairy Products
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Milk
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Russia
Abstract
Assessment of harmful industrial factors caused by work conditions in a modern milk processing plant.
Work conditions, rest, nutrition, medical service, and subjective health indices among the employees in a new milk processing plant were studied. We used a specially formed questionnaire; instrumental measurements of microclimate parameters, noise, and illumination at workplace; laboratory physical and chemical evaluation of air pollution with aerosols and gases in the plant premises; chronometric studies determining the workers' activity during the working day location, and physical and psychological body exertion at the time of industrial activities; and assessment of design and operating documents of the plant. Laboratory studies included 157 workers, 1,724 tests, 26 chronometric studies, and analysis of 11 plant's documents.
Unfavorable microclimatic conditions, noise, inadequate illumination, air pollution with dust and toxic substances, physical workload, increased demand for concentration, and monotony of labor in mass production professions were found. A great proportion of workers was dissatisfied with their working conditions and many suffered from occupational diseases and work-related diseases.
The conditions of work in the studied milk processing plant may be classified as harmful and dangerous. The flaws in technological process, omissions in design and construction of the plant, as well as its improper exploitation aggravated industrial harmful factors. In combination with unsatisfactory organization of rest, nutrition, and medical services in the plant these factors may affect the workers' health and cause general and occupational diseases.
PubMed ID
9933904 View in PubMed
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Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118747
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Emma Patterson
Susanna C Larsson
Alicja Wolk
Agneta Åkesson
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. emma.patterson@ki.se
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):74-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - adverse effects
Cheese - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines.
PubMed ID
23173172 View in PubMed
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189 records – page 1 of 19.