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228 records – page 1 of 23.

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activated dormant Cryptococcus gattii infection in a Dutch tourist who visited Vancouver Island (Canada): a molecular epidemiological approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148003
Source
Med Mycol. 2010 May;48(3):528-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ferry Hagen
Sander van Assen
Gert Jan Luijckx
Teun Boekhout
Greetje A Kampinga
Author Affiliation
CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Yeast and Basidiomycete Research, Uppsalalaan 8, Utrecht, The Netherlands. f.hagen@cbs.knaw.nl
Source
Med Mycol. 2010 May;48(3):528-31
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cryptococcosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Cryptococcus gattii - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Fungal - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Genotype
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycological Typing Techniques
Netherlands
Travel
Abstract
An ongoing outbreak of Cryptococcus gattii-caused infections, which emerged on Vancouver Island and the Pacific Northwest, has affected more than 200 of the islands' residents, of whom eight died. While C. gattii infections are rarely described in travelers, we report a case of cryptococcosis caused by C. gattii in a patient treated with high dose corticosteroids for systemic lupus erythematosus induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She acquired the disease during a visit to Vancouver Island one year before the onset of the symptoms. This indicates that C. gattii may cause a dormant infection that can be activated during treatment with corticosteroids.
PubMed ID
19824880 View in PubMed
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Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov., from human clinical samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162515
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Geert Huys
Marc Vancanneyt
Klaas D'Haene
Enevold Falsen
Georges Wauters
Peter Vandamme
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Microbiology, Ghent University, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. geert.huys@UGent.be
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Aerobiosis
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Belgium
Chaperonin 60 - genetics
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Fermentation
Genes, rRNA
Genotype
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Sweden
Abstract
The taxonomic position of 12 isolates tentatively assigned to the genus Bifidobacterium on the basis of a limited phenotypic characterization was examined. The isolates were collected between 1978 and 2005 in Belgium, Sweden and Norway, and originated from various human clinical samples, including urine, blood, urethra, oral cavity, tonsil, and abscesses of lung and aortic valve. On the basis of band number and clustering analysis, repetitive DNA element-based PCR fingerprinting using the BOXA1R and (GTG)(5) primers indicated that the clinical isolates represented a taxon probably not belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities revealed that the isolates were most closely affiliated to Parascardovia denticolens LMG 18312(T) (93.0-93.2 %), Scardovia inopinata LMG 18313(T) (92.9-93.1 %) and other members of the Bifidobacteriaceae, indicating that the isolates belong to a novel genus within that family. This observation was further substantiated by the results of partial sequencing of the heat-shock protein 60 gene (hsp60) and determination of the DNA G+C contents (47.3-48.3 mol%). Members of the novel taxon can be phenotypically distinguished from S. inopinata, P. denticolens and Gardnerella vaginalis by the ability to grow on agar under aerobic conditions and on the basis of positive reactions for acid production from L-arabinose, raffinose, salicin and D-xylose. Unambiguous phenotypic differentiation from Aeriscardovia aeriphila and Bifidobacterium species may be difficult, so phenotypic analyses should be complemented by molecular methods. The values for DNA-DNA binding among four members of the novel genus were in the range of 89-100 %, indicating that the strains should be considered as a single novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alloscardovia omnicolens is CCUG 31649(T) (=LMG 23792(T)).
PubMed ID
17625172 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Swedish Bordetella pertussis isolates with three typing methods: characterization of an epidemic lineage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149892
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2009 Sep;78(3):297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
A. Advani
H G J Van der Heide
H O Hallander
F R Mooi
Author Affiliation
Department of bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI), S-171 82 Solna, Sweden. reza.advani@smi.se
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2009 Sep;78(3):297-301
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bordetella pertussis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting - methods
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Humans
Minisatellite Repeats
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Three Bordetella pertussis typing methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were compared using a collection of Swedish strains. Of the three typing methods used, PFGE was found to be the most discriminatory. MLVA and MLST were less discriminatory, but may be valuable for strain discrimination when culture is not possible as they are based on PCR. The combination of MLVA/MLST was found to be equally discriminatory as PFGE and should therefore also be considered. The relationship between predominant lineages in Sweden and The Netherlands, characterized by the PFGE type BpSR11 and the allele for the pertussis toxin promoter ptxP3, respectively, was investigated. Linkage was found between the PFGE type BpSR11 and ptxP3 in that all BpSR11 strains carried ptxP3. On the other hand ptxP3 was found in several other PFGE-types. The presence of the ptxP3 allele in different genetic backgrounds may indicate horizontal gene transfer within B. pertussis or homoplasy. Alternatively, this observation may be due to convergence of PFGE types.
PubMed ID
19577594 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of Candida species infection in cancer patients using genetic fingerprinting and morphotyping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213946
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1995 Nov;31(3):211-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
B. O'Connell
D C Coleman
D. Bennett
D. Sullivan
S R McCann
C T Keane
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1995 Nov;31(3):211-7
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Candida - classification - isolation & purification
Candida albicans - classification - isolation & purification
Candidiasis - microbiology
DNA Fingerprinting
Female
Fungemia - microbiology
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Ireland
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - complications
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - complications
Male
Mycological Typing Techniques
Opportunistic Infections - microbiology
Serotyping
Abstract
During a six-week period a cluster of four cases of Candida fungaemia occurred in a mixed haematology/oncology unit of a large Dublin teaching hospital. A study was conducted to determine whether the cluster of cases was caused by a particular strain. Nine patients were studied; five who were colonized with Candida spp. and four who developed Candida fungaemia. Twenty-two clinical isolates of Candida spp. were collected and identified. Three of the patients with fungaemia yielded Candida albicans from blood cultures and C. tropicalis was isolated from the fourth patient. C. albicans isolates were serotyped, morphotyped and analysed by DNA fingerprinting of total cellular DNA using the cloned C. albicans-specific, mid-repeat sequence element 27A as a molecular probe. All C. albicans isolates were of serotype A. Eight distinguishable types were identified by both morphotyping and DNA typing from 19 C. albicans isolates recovered from seven individual patients, although there were several discrepancies. Of three patients from whom two or more isolates of C. albicans were recovered on separate occasions, two yielded recurrent isolates with different morphotype codes. However, in both cases, the recurrent isolates from individual patients yielded indistinguishable, or closely related, DNA fingerprint profiles. Both morphotyping and DNA fingerprint analysis readily distinguished the three blood culture isolates of C. albicans. We conclude that the Candida spp. infections in the unit were not due to cross-infection and were probably related to the patients' indigenous flora.
PubMed ID
8586790 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to setting up the Center for identification of exhumed bodies in Chechen Republic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163398
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2007 Mar-Apr;50(2):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Klevno
P L Ivanov
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2007 Mar-Apr;50(2):16-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Fingerprinting
Exhumation
Forensic Anthropology - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Forensic Genetics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Forensic Pathology - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Government Agencies
Humans
Russia
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The authors participated in the activity of a group of European experts who visited Moscow, Rostov-on-Don and Grozny in September 2005 to clarify situation with identification of exhumed unknown dead bodies of the civil population. The European experts recommend to set up Center for Identification in Chechen Republic (in Grozny). The authors propose to make DNA identification tests in the Russian Federation Center for Forensic Medical Evaluation in Moscow which has much experience and staff skilled in identification of unknown exhumed bodies and can solve the problem of genetic identification of unidentified bodies of people missed in the Chechen Republic more effectively.
PubMed ID
17520901 View in PubMed
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Arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction for fingerprinting the genotype identification of mutans streptococci in children with Down syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175642
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2005 Jan-Feb;25(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Simone Barone
Claudia Macedo
José Moacir Marin
Author Affiliation
Department of Histology, Dentistry School, Fundação Educacional de Barretos, State University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2005 Jan-Feb;25(1):37-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DNA Fingerprinting - methods
DNA Primers - diagnostic use
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Down Syndrome - microbiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mothers
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique - methods
Saliva - microbiology
Streptococcus mutans - classification - genetics
Streptococcus sobrinus - classification - genetics
Abstract
This study investigated the possible intrafamilial similarity of mutans streptococcal strains in some families with a child with Down syndrome using chromosomal DNA fingerprinting. The isolates were genotyped using arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction with the OPA 02 and OPA 03 primers. The results showed that five children with Down syndrome harbored mutans streptococci genotypes different from those of their mothers. A matching of genotypes was observed within the control pair (mother/child without Down syndrome). After six months, new samples were collected from all participants. Analysis showed that samples from children with Down syndrome were colonized by a new strain of Streptococcus mutans that did not match the previously collected one. The results suggest the S. mutans indigenous bacteria change more than once in children with Down syndrome.
PubMed ID
15779663 View in PubMed
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Are a blood alcohol concentration of 256mg/dl and minimal signs of impairment reliable indications of alcohol dependence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11540
Source
Med Sci Law. 1994 Jul;34(3):265-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
A W Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Chemistry, National Board of Forensic Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Med Sci Law. 1994 Jul;34(3):265-70
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Biological Markers - analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
Drug Tolerance
Ethanol - blood
Expert Testimony
Female
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
This article describes a drunk-driving scenario where a woman was apprehended for driving under the influence (DUI) with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 256mg/dl. The correctness of this result was vigorously challenged by a medical expert witness for the defence, who was actually a specialist in alcohol diseases. Despite reanalysis to confirm the BAC as well as a DNA profile to prove the identity of the blood specimen, the woman was acquitted of the charge of drunk driving by the lower court. However, she was subsequently found guilty in the High Court of Appeals with a unanimous decision and sentenced to four weeks imprisonment. This case report illustrates some of the problems surrounding the use of expert medical evidence by the defence to challenge the validity of the prosecution evidence based solely on a suspect's BAC. In situations such as these, an expert witness should be called by the prosecution to clarify and, if necessary, rebut medical and/or scientific opinions that might mislead the court and influence the outcome of the trial.
PubMed ID
7968407 View in PubMed
Less detail

228 records – page 1 of 23.