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5-alpha-reductase 2 polymorphisms as risk factors in prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19112
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Söderström T
Wadelius M
Andersson S-O
Johansson J-E
Johansson S
Granath F
Rane A
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. torbjorn.soderstrom@lmk.ck.lul.se
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Cell Differentiation
DNA - blood - metabolism
DNA Primers - chemistry
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostate-Specific Antigen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase - genetics
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a significant cause of death in Western countries and is under the strong influence of androgens. The steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 catalyzes the metabolism of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone in the prostate gland. The enzyme is a target in pharmacological treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using specific inhibitors such as finasteride. Makridakis et al. have characterized the V89L and A49T polymorphisms in recombinant expression systems. The L allelic variant has a lower Vmax/Km ratio than the V variant. In the A49T polymorphism, the T variant has an increased Vmax/Km ratio. We performed a population-based case-control study of the impact of the SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms on the risk of prostate cancer. We also studied the relation between the genotypes and age at diagnosis, tumor, node, metastasis stage, differentiation grade, prostate specific antigen and heredity. The study included 175 prostate cancer patients and 159 healthy controls that were matched for age. There was an association with SRD5A2 V89L LL genotype and metastases at the time of diagnosis, OR 5.67 (95% CI 1.44-22.30) when adjusted for age, differentiation grade, T-stage and prostate specific antigen. Heterozygous prostate cancer cases that carried the SRD5A2 A49T AT genotype were significantly younger than cases that carried the AA genotype, (mean age 66 years vs 71, P = 0.038). The SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms were, however, not associated with altered prostate cancer risk. Further studies of the V89L polymorphism may lead to better understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer metastases.
PubMed ID
12042668 View in PubMed
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[Content of nucleic acids in the mammary gland tissues and blood plasma in goats during lactation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66222
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1976 Jan-Feb;48(1):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Iakovenko
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1976 Jan-Feb;48(1):45-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA - blood - metabolism
English Abstract
Female
Goats
Lactation
Mammary Glands, Animal - metabolism
Organ Specificity
Pregnancy
RNA - blood - metabolism
Time Factors
Abstract
The experimental data concerning changes in the content of nucleic acids in the mammary gland tissue as well as in the arterial and venous blood plasm are presented according to the months of lactation. The highest content of RNA phosphorus in the mammary gland tissue is observed the first week after lambing and then in the period of intensive lactation it is maintained at a relatively high level and only in the seventh month it decreases. The content of DNA phosphorus in the mammary gland tissue during lactation gradually lowers. In the plasm of arterial and venous blood the content of RNA phosphorus during lactation changes in the same regularity as in the mammary gland tissue. The content of DNA phosphorus remains unchanged.
PubMed ID
1258160 View in PubMed
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Dynamics of antibody nuclease activity in blood of women during pregnancy and lactation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63488
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2003 Aug;68(8):890-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
V N Buneva
A N Kudryavtseva
A V Gal'vita
V V Dubrovskaya
O V Khokhlova
I A Kalinina
V A Galenok
G A Nevinsky
Author Affiliation
Novosibirsk Institute of Bioogranic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2003 Aug;68(8):890-900
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Catalytic - blood - immunology - metabolism
DNA - blood - metabolism
Endonucleases - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology - metabolism
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology - metabolism
Lactation - immunology
Pregnancy
RNA - blood - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroiditis, Autoimmune - blood - immunology - metabolism
Abstract
In human milk we previously found catalytic antibodies (abzymes) catalyzing hydrolysis of DNA, RNA, NMP, NDP, and NTP and also phosphorylation of proteins and lipids. In the present study we have analyzed nuclease activities of antibodies in blood of women during pregnancy and lactation. Blood of healthy male and female volunteers lacked catalytically active antibodies, whereas antibodies from blood of pregnant women hydrolyzed DNA and RNA and their relative activity varied over a wide range. Relative blood abzyme activities significantly increased after delivery and at the beginning of lactation. The highest abzyme activity was observed in blood of parturient women. Although the dynamics of changes in antibody DNase activity during pregnancy was rather individual for each woman, there was a common trend in the increase in antibody activity in the first and/or third trimester of the pregnancy. The DNase activity of IgG and IgM from blood of healthy pregnant women was 4-5 times less than that from pregnant women with pronounced autoimmune thyroiditis.
PubMed ID
12948390 View in PubMed
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Effects of aging and caloric restriction on I-compounds in liver, kidney and white blood cell DNA of male Brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24849
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 1991 May;58(2-3):279-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
E. Randerath
R W Hart
A. Turturro
T F Danna
R. Reddy
K. Randerath
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030.
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 1991 May;58(2-3):279-96
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
DNA - blood - metabolism
Diet
Energy intake
Kidney - metabolism
Kinetics
Leukocytes - metabolism
Liver - metabolism
Male
Neoplasms, Experimental - etiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Rodent tissues display species-, strain-, sex- and tissue-specific adduct-like DNA modifications termed I-compounds, which increase with age, are modulated by diet and are presumably derived from indigenous metabolic intermediates. We have explored whether I-compounds are affected by caloric restriction, which is known to extend life span and retard age-related degenerative and neoplastic diseases. Male Brown-Norway rats were fed NIH-31 diet ad libitum (AL). Calorically restricted (CR) rats received 60% of AL consumption, starting at 3.5 months. DNA was analyzed by 32P-postlabeling at 1, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 months of age in liver, kidney and white blood cells. I-compounds in AL liver and kidney exhibited complex tissue specific profiles; I-compound levels increased with age, plateaued between 8 and 18 months depending on tissue and diet and were 8.7 (liver) and 27.4 (kidney) modifications in 10(8) nucleotides at 24 months, thereby exceeding the corresponding 1-month values by 3.7- and 16.6-fold. CR resulted in similar profiles but did not diminish age-related increases, rather I-compound levels in CR liver and kidney were increased by about 70% and 30% versus age-matched AL rats. White blood cells exhibited few I-compounds and at low levels; age-related increases were small overall but more pronounced in CR rats. Higher I-compound levels in CR animals, which were presumably a consequence of metabolic effects elicited by CR, thus correlated with extended life span and, therefore, may be beneficial, in agreement with previous findings showing an association between reduced I-compound levels and hepatocarcinogenesis as well as organ susceptibility to diseases.
PubMed ID
1875735 View in PubMed
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