Skip header and navigation

Refine By

64 records – page 1 of 7.

Antibody levels and protection after hepatitis B vaccination: results of a 15-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5632
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2005
Author
Brian J McMahon
Dana L Bruden
Kenneth M Petersen
Lisa R Bulkow
Alan J Parkinson
Omana Nainan
Marina Khristova
Carolyn Zanis
Helen Peters
Harold S Margolis
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. bdm9@cdc.gov
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):333-41
Date
Mar-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Hepatitis B virus - genetics - immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Vaccination
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The duration of protection afforded by hepatitis B vaccination is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine antibody persistence and protection from hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: 15 villages in southwest Alaska. PARTICIPANTS: 1578 Alaska Natives vaccinated at age 6 months or older. INTERVENTION: During 1981-1982, participants received 3 doses of plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. This cohort was followed annually over the first 11 years, and 841 (53%) persons were tested at 15 years. MEASUREMENTS: Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), markers of HBV infection, and testing to identify HBV variants. RESULTS: Levels of anti-HBs in the cohort decreased from a geometric mean concentration of 822 mIU/mL after vaccination to 27 mIU/mL at 15 years. Initial anti-HBs level, older age at vaccination, and male sex were associated with persistence of higher anti-HBs levels at 15 years when analyzed by a longitudinal linear mixed model. After adjustment for initial anti-HBs level and sex, those vaccinated at age 6 months to 4 years had the lowest anti-HBs level at 15 years. Asymptomatic breakthrough infections were detected in 16 participants and occurred more frequently in persons who did not respond to vaccination than those who responded (P = 0.01). Among infected persons with viremia, 2 were infected with wild-type HBV and 4 had HBV surface glycoprotein variants, generally accompanied by wild-type HBV. LIMITATIONS: The loss of participants to follow-up at 15 years was 47%. However, characteristics of persons tested were similar to those of persons lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatitis B vaccination strongly protected against infection for at least 15 years in all age groups. Antibody levels decreased the most among persons immunized at 4 years of age or younger.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):384-515738458
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):I3415738447
PubMed ID
15738452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of human bocavirus 1 infection with respiratory disease in childhood follow-up study, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127339
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Feb;18(2):264-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Mira Meriluoto
Lea Hedman
Laura Tanner
Ville Simell
Marjaana Mäkinen
Satu Simell
Juha Mykkänen
Jan Korpelainen
Olli Ruuskanen
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Olli Simell
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Feb;18(2):264-71
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Human bocavirus - immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - immunology - virology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - virology
Viremia - immunology
Abstract
Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) DNA is frequently detected in the upper airways of young children with respiratory symptoms. Because of its persistence and frequent co-detection with other viruses, however, its etiologic role has remained controversial. During 2009-2011, using HBoV1 IgM, IgG, and IgG-avidity enzyme immunoassays and quantitative PCR, we examined 1,952 serum samples collected consecutively at 3- to 6-month intervals from 109 constitutionally healthy children from infancy to early adolescence. Primary HBoV1 infection, as indicated by seroconversion, appeared in 102 (94%) of 109 children at a mean age of 2.3 years; the remaining 7 children were IgG antibody positive from birth. Subsequent secondary infections or IgG antibody increases were evident in 38 children and IgG reversions in 10. Comparison of the seroconversion interval with the next sampling interval for clinical events indicated that HBoV1 primary infection, but not secondary immune response, was significantly associated with acute otitis media and respiratory illness.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2011 Apr 1;203(7):1031-2; author reply 1032-321402553
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2010 Nov;49(3):158-6220833582
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2011 Nov;204(9):1403-1221921203
Cites: Diabet Med. 1999 Dec;16(12):985-9210656226
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2002 May 30;115(1):30-612116174
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Sep 6;102(36):12891-616118271
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Oct 15;41(8):1201-316163641
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2006 Nov 1;194(9):1276-8217041854
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 1;195(7):1038-4517330795
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 1;44(7):904-1017342639
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2007 Apr;38(4):321-517336143
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Oct;45(10):3218-2317699639
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Feb 15;46(4):540-618199037
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Feb;14(2):217-2118258113
Cites: J Virol Methods. 2008 Apr;149(1):110-718289709
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2008 Apr;21(2):291-304, table of contents18400798
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul 1;198(1):41-5018491974
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008 Oct;27(10):897-90218756188
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2008 Nov;27(11):969-7318833027
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan 15;199(2):196-20019072716
Cites: Viral Immunol. 2008 Dec;21(4):443-919115933
Cites: PLoS Pathog. 2009 Apr;5(4):e100039119381259
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2009 Aug;45(4):300-319473872
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 2009 Nov;168(11):1365-7219221788
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Sep;15(9):1423-3019788810
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2009 Nov;46(3):234-719736042
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009 Nov;28(11):1018-919730155
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):148-5520022295
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-820031484
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2010 May;48(1):44-820227338
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2010 Jun 1;201(11):1625-3220415535
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2010 Jun 1;201(11):1633-4320415538
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Jun;29(6):557-820508481
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010 Jun;16(6):633-919681960
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 May;127(5):810-621482601
PubMed ID
22305021 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7373
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(7):529-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Terese L Katzenstein
Roberto S Oliveri
Thomas Benfield
Jesper Eugen-Olsen
Claus Nielsen
Jan Gerstoft
Author Affiliation
AIDS-Laboratory, Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Katzenstein@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(7):529-33
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
DNA, Viral - blood
Denmark
Genotype
HIV Infections - blood
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Prognosis
RNA, Viral - blood
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Viral Load
Abstract
Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided into 3 groups, according to whether their cell-associated HIV DNA load was or = 2,500 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Clinical progression rates differed significantly between the groups (p
PubMed ID
12195879 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56563
Source
J Med Virol. 2005 Dec;77(4):481-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Thora B Björnsdottir
Barbara Stanzeit
Matti Sällberg
Arthur Löve
Catharina Hultgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Virology F68, Karolinska Institute, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Med Virol. 2005 Dec;77(4):481-5
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Viral - blood - genetics
Epidemiology, Molecular
Genotype
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - virology
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B virus - drug effects - genetics
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
At present eight hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have been characterized: A to H. The most common genotype in Northern Europe is genotype A. So far there is no record of the specific HBV genotype distribution in Iceland. Iceland has a small population whose homogeneity has changed due to increasing migration during the past decades. The distribution of HBV genotypes in Iceland was analyzed using sera from 170 Icelandic patients. The samples were obtained before 1989, during an HBV epidemic among intravenous drug users in 1989 to 1992 and after 1994. A fragment of the HBV S-gene was amplified, sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Among samples derived before 1989 genotypes A, C, and D were found. Most of the samples diagnosed during the epidemic belonged to genotype D and a smaller portion to genotype A. This suggests that the epidemic was most likely caused either by an endogenous HBV strain or by a strain imported from Europe or the USA. Among samples obtained after 1994, genotypes A to E and G were found, but the majority were of genotypes A, C, and D. This is consistent with an increase in migration and immigration from regions in Asia and Africa during the past 10 years. Thus, the changing prevalence of HBV genotypes in a small isolated community such as Iceland reflects the influence of migration and increasing contacts with regions outside the Western World.
PubMed ID
16254980 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic hepatitis B. Impact of hepatitis D virus superinfection and the hepatitis B e-system on histological outcome, and correlation of the hepatitis B e-system to HBV-DNA in serum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56953
Source
Scand J Infect Dis Suppl. 1986;50:1-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
G. Lindh
Source
Scand J Infect Dis Suppl. 1986;50:1-45
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Chronic Disease
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Hepatitis B - immunology - pathology
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B e Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B virus - genetics
Hepatitis D - epidemiology - pathology
Hepatitis Delta Virus - genetics - immunology
Hepatitis, Chronic - immunology - pathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Cirrhosis - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic evolution after acute hepatitis B virus infection. During a 13 months period 1977-1978 a total of 129 cases of acute viral hepatitis type B occurred among patients who were admitted with hepatitis to Roslagstull, Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Less than 1% progressed to chronicity. Prevalence of Delta superinfection was studied among 60 patients with chronic hepatitis B. Nineteen (32%) were anti-delta positive. The majority of the positive patients were either non-European immigrants or addicts, both 9/19 (47%). Infections with the delta agent was found to have occurred in Stockholm already in the early 1970s. Rate of HBeAg clearance during chronic HBV was studied among 36 HBeAg positive patients. Seroconversion to anti-HBe was noted in 17 patients (47%), whereas HBeAg persisted in 19 during a mean follow-up period of 53 months. The spontaneous annual HBeAg seroconversion rate was 11%. HBeAg clearance occurred as frequently among homosexual men as among patients in other categories. However, 12/14 homosexual men were HBeAg positive after 2 years follow-up, compared with 1/13 drug addicts. Thus, homosexual men seemed to require a longer time for HBeAg seroconversion than i.v. drug addicts. HBV-DNA in serum, a strong indicator of viral particles and infectivity was analysed among patients with HBeAg seroconversion, initial HBeAg negativity and/or delta superinfection. HBV-DNA was found in 75-80% of our HBeAg positive patients. A correlation between chronic liver disease and presence of HBV-DNA in serum was also found. Thus, HBV DNA was found in 63% of patients with CAH or CAH/CI as compared with only 39% of patients with CPH. Delta infected patients had HBV-DNA more often than those without hepatitis D infection. Seven delta infected, anti-HBe positive, patients were still HBV-DNA positive five to eight years later. Therefore delta infected anti-HBe positive patients can be infectious for prolonged periods. Histological outcome. 63% (12/19) anti-delta positive patients were classified as CAH with or without cirrhosis as against 39% (16/41) of the anti-delta negative patients. Eleven of 15 homosexual men (73%) had histological findings classified as CAH or CAH/CI. None of them were superinfected with HDV. Thus homosexual men developed severe hepatic lesions without being delta infected. In contrast 78% (7/9) i.v. drug addicts with CAH were delta infected. A numerical scoring system was applied and compared with conventional morphological classification of liver histology to assess the histological outcome of 42 patients with repetitive liver biopsies.
PubMed ID
3468608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic hepatitis B in children in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33208
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1999;31(2):109-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A. Söderström
M. Lindh
K. Eriksson
P. Horal
M. Krantz
B. Kristiansson
J. Lindberg
G. Norkrans
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Ostra, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1999;31(2):109-14
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Carrier State - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - blood
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B e Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Hepatitis B, Chronic - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Infant
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sweden is a low prevalence area for hepatitis B, but the number of chronic carriers has increased during the last decade due to immigration. Out of a total of 120 children with identified chronic hepatitis B in Gothenburg, Sweden, 93 were investigated during the 2-year period 1994-95. The children had a mean age of 10.9 years and originated from 21 different countries. Most infections were discovered during various screening programmes after arrival in Sweden. A total of 90 of the 93 children were HBV-DNA positive by Amplicor HBV Monitor (Roche Diagnostics) and 58% (54/93) were HBeAg positive. All children either originated from areas with a high or medium prevalence of HBV infection (81/93, 87%) or were born in Sweden to mothers originating from high or medium prevalence countries (12/93, 13%). Three of these 12 children were vertically infected in spite of adequate immunoprophylaxis and 8 were born to mothers with undiscovered chronic HBV infection. In all, 34 children had mothers who were HBsAg positive. No overt case of transmission was notified in day-care centres or schools, or from a child to a non-immune parent. None of the children reported any symptoms of liver disease, but 38% (35/93) had elevated aminotransferases. Therefore, screening programmes are essential to identify chronic HBV infection in children in order to prevent transmission and to find individuals at risk of progressive liver damage who should be considered for treatment.
PubMed ID
10447315 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical and serological variation between patients infected with different Hepatitis B virus genotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56579
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Dec;42(12):5837-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Karin Kidd-Ljunggren
Erling Myhre
Jonas Bläckberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. Karin.Kidd@infek.lu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Dec;42(12):5837-41
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa
Asia
Central America
DNA, Viral - blood
Europe
Female
Genotype
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B e Antigens - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B virus - classification - genetics - immunology - pathogenicity
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has eight genotypes which have distinct geographical distributions. Studies comparing differences in the clinical outcomes of infections caused by strains with genotype-related variations in the HBV genome have largely compared genotypes B and C and genotypes A and D but not all four genotypes. The present study included 196 HBV-infected patients attending an infectious diseases outpatient clinic in Sweden. The age and geographic origin, liver function, HBeAg and anti-HBe status, and the presence or absence of HBV DNA were analyzed for each patient. HBV DNA was detected in 144 patients, and the HBV genotype and the core promoter and precore sequences were determined for the isolates from 101 of these patients. Among the patients who might be considered most likely to be nonviremic, namely, anti-HBe-positive HBV carriers with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, 65% had detectable HBV DNA and were thus viremic. Among the viremic patients, HBeAg-positive patients were more likely to have elevated ALT levels than anti-HBe-positive patients. HBV genotypes A to F were represented in the study, and their distributions coincided accurately with the origin of the patient. A significantly higher number of genotype D-infected patients were anti-HBe positive and had elevated ALT levels (42% of genotype D-infected patients but 0% of patients infected with genotypes B and C). Genotype D strains with mutations in the core promoter and precore regions were significantly correlated with elevated ALT levels in the patients. The differences were not age related. Therefore, in this large-scale cross-sectional study, genotype D appears to be associated with more active disease.
PubMed ID
15583320 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical findings in a multi-ethnic adult hepatitis B virus patient population in Denmark with emphasis on genotypic characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270497
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1032-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Nanna-Sophie Brinck-Jensen
Purnima Erichsen
Britta Tarp
Jens Lindberg
Lena H Kristensen
Mogens Erlandsen
Eskild Petersen
Peter D C Leutscher
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1032-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
DNA, Viral - blood
Denmark
Ethnic Groups
Female
Genotype
Hepatitis B e Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B virus - genetics
Hepatitis B, Chronic - drug therapy - ethnology
Humans
Liver - pathology - virology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Most knowledge about chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is based upon studies in high-endemic areas with one or two predominant genotype(s). The aim of the study was to describe clinical characteristics of a heterogeneous genotypic HBV patient population in a low-endemic European country.
Data from HBV patients currently followed in a Danish university hospital and affiliated regional clinics were reviewed in accordance to genotype status.
Of 540 HBV patients, 462 (86%) were of non-Danish ethnicity originating from 43 different countries. HBV genotype was known in 37% of the patients: A (11%), B (25%), C (25%), D (37%) and E (2%). Logistic regression analysis of pre-treatment data among genotype A-D patients receiving nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA) therapy revealed a decreased HBeAg rate by age (OR = 0.93; CI: 0.89-0.97; p
PubMed ID
25861877 View in PubMed
Less detail

CMV quantitative PCR in the diagnosis of CMV disease in patients with HIV-infection - a retrospective autopsy based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85196
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2007;7:127
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Brantsaeter Arne B
Holberg-Petersen Mona
Jeansson Stig
Goplen Anne K
Bruun Johan N
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevaal University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. abrant@online.no
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2007;7:127
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - diagnosis - virology
Adult
Autopsy
Cytomegalovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis - virology
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
HIV Infections - complications
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Norway
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Viral Load
Viremia - diagnosis - virology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced HIV infection at the time of diagnosis and patients not responding to antiretroviral therapy are at risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease. Earlier studies of patients with HIV infection have demonstrated that the diagnosis is often first made post-mortem. In recent years new molecular biological tests have become available for diagnosis of CMV disease. Although clinical evaluation of tests for diagnosis of CMV disease in HIV-infected individuals is suboptimal without autopsy, no results from such studies have been published. The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic utility of CMV quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in plasma from HIV and CMV seropositive patients who died during the period 1991-2002 and in whom autopsy was performed. METHODS: Autopsy was performed in all cases, as part of routine evaluation of HIV-infected cases followed at Ullevaal University Hospital. Of 125 patients included, 53 had CMV disease, 37 of whom were first diagnosed at autopsy. CMV disease was diagnosed either by ophthalmoscopic findings typical of CMV retinitis, biopsy or autopsy. One or two plasma samples taken prior to the first diagnosis of CMV disease (alive or at autopsy) or death without CMV disease were analysed by CMV quantitative PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated for different CMV viral load cut-offs and according to detection of viraemia in one versus two samples. RESULTS: Twenty-seven of 53 patients with CMV disease (51%) and 10 of 72 patients without CMV disease (14%) had detectable viraemia in at least one sample. Sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of the test, maximised with a cut-off at the test's limit of detection of CMV viraemia (400 copies/mL), were 47% and 70%, respectively. With cut-off at 10 000 copies/mL, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were 100%. With a requirement for CMV viraemia in two samples, specificity and PPV were 100% in patients with CMV viraemia above the limit of detection. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that quantitative CMV PCR is best used to rule in, rather than to rule out CMV disease in HIV-infected individuals at high risk.
PubMed ID
17986346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contribution of the CCR5 and MBL genes to susceptibility to HIV type 1 infection in the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205454
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1998 May 20;14(8):695-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1998
Author
T. Pastinen
K. Liitsola
P. Niini
M. Salminen
A C Syvänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. tomi.pastinen@ktl.fi
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1998 May 20;14(8):695-8
Date
May-20-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Collectins
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Viral - blood
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing - methods
Genotype
HIV Infections - genetics
HIV-1
Humans
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Abstract
Homozygosity for a variant of a chemokine receptor gene (CCR5) has been shown to protect from HIV-1 infection. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene have been suggested to predispose to HIV-1 infection. These genetic variants and their possible role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection were studied in sample material from more than 300 Finnish HIV-infected and control individuals. The genotyping was carried out efficiently using a novel, primer extension assay in a miniaturized oligonucleotide array format. Homozygotes for the protective deletion allele of the CCR5 gene were found only in the control group, and the frequency of the allele was high in the Finnish population. Homozygosity for the MBL variant alleles was enriched significantly in the HIV-1-infected group, thus providing further evidence for the harmfulness of MBL variant homozygosity in HIV-1 transmission.
PubMed ID
9618082 View in PubMed
Less detail

64 records – page 1 of 7.