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Absence of human herpes virus 8 in semen from healthy Danish donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7580
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Sep;14(9):2274-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
J. Kelsen
B. Tarp
N. Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Marselisborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, P.P. Oerumsgade 11, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Sep;14(9):2274-6
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Viral - analysis
Denmark
Herpesvirus 8, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sarcoma, Kaposi - virology
Semen - virology
Sexually transmitted diseases
Tissue Donors
Abstract
Epidemiological data indicate a sexual route of transmission of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated Kaposi's sarcoma. Recently human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) has been proposed as the aetiological agent for development of Kaposi's sarcoma. Further the virus has been reported in semen obtained from healthy men. In Denmark strict biochemical and microbiological criteria are used in combination with an intensive interview to select semen donors. Despite these strict criteria, HHV-8 may be transmitted to a recipient and even the child by the use of donor semen. We used four different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and one nested PCR to test semen from 100 Danish donors for the presence of HHV-8 DNA. All 100 samples were consistently negative for HHV-8 DNA, while only one sample (1%) was positive for cytomegalovirus DNA. As HHV-8 was not demonstrated in any of the semen samples, we conclude that the frequency of HHV-8 in semen from Danish donors is very low.
PubMed ID
10469694 View in PubMed
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Absence of human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II infection in an Ontario hemophilia population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223481
Source
Transfusion. 1992 Jul-Aug;32(6):513-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Dekaban
M. Inwood
D. Waters
J. Drouin
J. Teitel
Author Affiliation
Immunology Group, John Roberts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Transfusion. 1992 Jul-Aug;32(6):513-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Donors
Blotting, Western
DNA, Viral - analysis
HIV Seropositivity - blood
HTLV-I Infections - blood
HTLV-II Infections - blood
Hemophilia A - blood - microbiology
Humans
Ontario
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Two hundred ninety-three serum samples from Ontario hemophiliacs and 200 samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive blood donors were screened for the presence of antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay, and Western blot techniques. None of the serum samples provided unequivocal positive results, but several samples gave inconclusive results. Of the hemophiliacs with inconclusive serologic results from whom peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA could be obtained, all were negative for HTLV-I and HTLV type II (HTLV-II) sequences as determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR was also performed on a lymph node biopsy sample taken from a hemophiliac who developed a rare T-cell lymphoma; the sample was negative for HTLV-I and -II sequences. These results indicate that Ontario hemophiliacs have not been exposed to HTLV-I or HTLV-II.
PubMed ID
1502703 View in PubMed
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The absence of vaginal human papillomavirus 16 DNA in women who have not experienced sexual intercourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218229
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1994 May;83(5 Pt 1):735-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
E. Rylander
L. Ruusuvaara
M W Almströmer
M. Evander
G. Wadell
Author Affiliation
Health Unit for School Children, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1994 May;83(5 Pt 1):735-7
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Coitus
DNA Probes, HPV
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Papillomaviridae - genetics - isolation & purification
Vagina - virology
Abstract
To determine whether young women who have not experienced sexual intercourse may harbor genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the vaginal-ectocervical mucosa.
We included 151 women, 10-25 years of age, attending two adolescent health care units (Stockholm and Uppsala) and one primary health care center (Umeå). The size of the hymenal orifice, use of tampons, and the habit of digital vaginal manipulation were registered. Samples of epithelial cells were collected from the vagina and analyzed for the presence of HPV using polymerase chain reaction.
One hundred thirty of 154 samples contained an adequate number of cells. Two samples were HPV 6 DNA-positive. None were HPV 16 DNA-positive. None of the women had external genital warts. In 84%, the hymenal opening was 15 mm or less. Forty-eight percent of the women used tampons during periods. Fifty-four percent had inserted their own finger into the vagina and in 23%, a boyfriend's finger had penetrated the vagina.
Human papillomavirus is rarely present vaginally in virginal women, even with the use of tampons or digital penetration.
PubMed ID
8164934 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of HPV testing of vaginal smear obtained with a novel self-sampling device.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Stenvall Harriet
Wikström Ingrid
Backlund Ingrid
Wilander Erik
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Self Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears - instrumentation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most of women diagnosed as having cervical cancer have not participated in organized cytological screening. Aim. A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of human papilloma virus testing by self-collected vaginal samples in comparison to regular cytological screening. The agreement of hybrid capture 2 assay and polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of human papilloma virus DNA in self-collected vaginal samples and clinician-obtained cervical smears was investigated. METHOD: Forty-three women aged 23-58 years admitted for further examination due to previous positive cytology in the organized screening participated in self-collecting of vaginal samples with a novel self-sampling device. During the visit a clinician also collected a cervical smear using a cytobrush. The vaginal samples collected with the self-sampling device were analyzed for high-risk human papilloma virus with the hybrid capture 2 assay technique and the cervical smears were Pap-stained, examined cytologically and after that reanalyzed for human papilloma virus DNA using a polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULT: The vaginal samples were positive for high-risk human papilloma virus in 37% of the cases using hybrid capture 2 assay. Twelve of the 43 Pap smears showed positive cytology (ASCUS-CIN 3), of which 4 showed CIN 2-3. When polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 40% of the glass slides. The agreement between cytology and the two human papilloma virus testing techniques was 67-74% (kappa 0.27-0.45) and the agreement between the two human papilloma virus tests was 70% (kappa 0.36). CONCLUSION: Testing for high-risk human papilloma virus can identify more women at risk of developing cervical cancer than cytology irrespective of the sampling method. Furthermore, offering a self-sampling device for collection of vaginal smear seems to be a useful screening tool for cervical cancer among women not responding to an invitation for smear sampling.
PubMed ID
17230283 View in PubMed
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Acetowhitening of the cervix and vulva as a predictor of subclinical human papillomavirus infection: sensitivity and specificity in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21915
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):744-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
M. Jonsson
R. Karlsson
M. Evander
A. Gustavsson
E. Rylander
G. Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):744-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetic Acid - administration & dosage
Adult
Cervix Uteri - pathology - virology
Colposcopy
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Indicators and Reagents - administration & dosage
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Vulva - pathology - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate acetowhite changes of the cervix and vulva as a predictor of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. METHODS: In this population-based study all women aged 19, 21, 23, and 25 years and registered as living in a primary health care area within the city of Umeå, Sweden were eligible for inclusion. Each participant underwent a gynecologic examination with sampling of epithelial cells for HPV-DNA detection and Papanicolaou smear. Colposcopy was performed 5 minutes after application of 5% acetic acid. A two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed for HPV-DNA detection. RESULTS: Colposcopy and sampling of epithelial cells could be performed in 535 women. The sensitivity of detection of HPV infection by the acetowhitening of the cervix was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18%, 26%). The specificity of detection of HPV infection by the acetowhitening of the cervix was 90% (95% CI 87%, 93%). The sensitivity of detection of HPV infection by cytology was 13% (95% CI 10%, 16%), and the specificity was 99% (95% CI 98%, 100%). The combination of acetowhitening and cytology did not improve the diagnostic value. CONCLUSION: Acetowhitening of the cervix and vulva has low sensitivity as a predictor of HPV infections as determined by PCR.
PubMed ID
9351757 View in PubMed
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Active cytomegalovirus infection diagnosed by real-time PCR in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a prospective, controlled observational study (.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285270
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mari Thörn
Fredrik Rorsman
Anders Rönnblom
Per Sangfelt
Alkwin Wanders
Britt-Marie Eriksson
Kåre Bondeson
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis
DNA, Viral - analysis
Feces - virology
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Immunosuppression - adverse effects
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
It is assumed that cytomegaloviral (CMV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is caused by reactivation due to the immunosuppressive therapy, but the role of CMV as a pathophysiological factor and prognostic marker in IBD is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate CMV infection in IBD, with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on newly diagnosed disease.
In this prospective, controlled study, 67 patients with IBD and 34 control patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or rectal bleeding were included. Serology for CMV was analysed along with CMV DNA in plasma, mucosal biopsies, and faeces. Mucosal biopsies were further analysed with histopathology and CMV immunohistochemistry.
Detection of CMV IgM was more common in patients with IBD, compared to controls, 21% versus 3%. CMV DNA was found in 16% of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated IBD and in 38% of steroid-treated patients. Four of the five patients that needed urgent surgery were CMV-DNA positive in at least one of three sample types. None of the controls had detectable CMV DNA.
Active CMV infection was found in high proportions of newly diagnosed untreated patients with IBD, in patients on immunosuppression and in patients in the need of surgery. Low CMV-DNA levels in non-immunosuppressed patients were not a risk factor for the development of more severe IBD, while the detection of CMV DNA in patients on immunosuppressive therapy may foresee disease progression.
PubMed ID
27142339 View in PubMed
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Acute hepatitis B in Western Sweden--genotypes and transmission routes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10427
Source
Infection. 2000 May-Jun;28(3):161-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Lindh
P. Horal
G. Norkrans
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Virology, Göteborg University, Sweden. magnus.lindh@microbio.gu.se
Source
Infection. 2000 May-Jun;28(3):161-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Genes, Viral
Genotype
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Hepatitis B virus - genetics
Heterosexuality
Homosexuality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A retrospective study of acute hepatitis B (AHB) during 1995-1996 in G?teborg, Sweden, was carried out to investigate whether the increasing number of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers due to immigration in northwestern Europe has influenced the incidence or genotype heterogenicity. 24 cases of AHB were identified, the probable transmission route of which was intravenous drug use (IVDU) in 11 (46%), heterosexual in six (25%), homosexual in one, hemodialysis in two and unknown in four cases. In no case was the source an immigrant with chronic HBV infection. Genotype D was seen in 12 patients, seven being anti-HCV-positive IVD users, two probably infected heterosexually and three with an unknown source. Genotype A was found in six patients: three IVD users, a sexual partner of an IVD user and two dialysis patients. Genotype B was found in one patient infected during travel to Vietnam, and genotype C in one patient, probably infected sexually from a previously identified chronic carrier. In conclusion, genotype D is the main genotype and IVDU still the major risk factor for AHB in Goteborg, while transmission from immigrants appears to be of minor importance despite the fact that this group comprises over 90% of the young, highly infectious carriers.
PubMed ID
10879641 View in PubMed
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Acute viral encephalitis in adults--a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204152
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1998;30(3):215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M. Studahl
T. Bergström
L. Hagberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1998;30(3):215-20
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adenoviridae - isolation & purification
Adult
Aged
DNA, Viral - analysis - cerebrospinal fluid
Encephalitis, Viral - cerebrospinal fluid - epidemiology - virology
Enterovirus - isolation & purification
Female
Herpesviridae - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We have prospectively studied 27 adult patients attending the Department of Infectious Diseases, Göteborg, Sweden, between October 1992 and October 1996 with a diagnosis of acute viral encephalitis. In addition to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) virus isolations and antibody analyses against herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), enterovirus, adenovirus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and mycoplasma, polymerase chain reaction test (PCR) to 5 viruses from the family of human herpes viridae, and to adenovirus as well as to enterovirus were analysed in CSF. 10 patients had herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), 1 had varicella zoster virus, 1 had tick-borne encephalitis, and 2 had Influenza A infections. In 13 patients the aetiology remained unclear. Eight patients with HSV-1 encephalitis and clinical symptoms for 2-11 d before admission were PCR-positive, while 2 patients with a
PubMed ID
9790126 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix: the presence of human papillomavirus and the method of detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18218
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Sonia Andersson
Barbro Larson
Anders Hjerpe
Claes Silfverswärd
Jan Sällström
Erik Wilander
Eva Rylander
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Science, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. sonia.andersson@telia.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Adult
Age Factors
Contraceptives, Oral
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Vaginal Smears - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Effective screening programs have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinomas but have had a limited sensitivity in the detection of adenocarcinoma precursor lesions. The aim of our study was to analyze cervical adenocarcinoma in greater detail: symptoms preceding the detection, the method of detection and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with respect to age at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical data were abstracted from the medical records of 82 women with pure invasive cervical adenocarcinomas. As diagnostic tools we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and/or direct DNA sequencing for HPV detection. RESULTS: Age at diagnosis predicting factors were HPV status, positive lymph nodes, histology and stage. HPV-negativity, lymph node metastases, advanced stage and poor differentiation were all associated with a high diagnostic age. In the multivariate analysis only HPV status was shown to have an independent impact on age at diagnosis, while stage showed only borderline significance. Twenty-three percent of the cancers were detected by screening and the remaining were due to different symptoms. Among the women considered, 93% had a normal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear 3 years before diagnosis and 60% within 1 year. There was no significant correlation between smoking, oral contraceptives and HPV-positivity. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of HPV was significantly associated with a high age at diagnosis. Pap screening had a limited effect in detecting adenocarcinoma at an early stage.
PubMed ID
12956848 View in PubMed
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Alternative technologies in cervical cancer screening: a randomised evaluation trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167012
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ahti Anttila
Matti Hakama
Laura Kotaniemi-Talonen
Pekka Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Mass Screening Registry, Finnish Cancer Registry, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-00170 Helsinki, Finland. ahti.anttila@cancer.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:252
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cytological Techniques
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - pathology
Precancerous Conditions - pathology
Program Evaluation - methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Abstract
Cervical cancer screening programmes have markedly reduced the incidence and mortality rates of the disease. A substantial amount of deaths from the disease could be prevented further by organised screening programmes or improving currently running programmes.
We present here a randomised evaluation trial design integrated to the Finnish cervical cancer screening programme, in order to evaluate renewal of the programme using emerging technological alternatives. The main aim of the evaluation is to assess screening effectiveness, using subsequent cancers as the outcome and screen-detected pre-cancers as surrogates. For the time being, approximately 863,000 women have been allocated to automation-assisted cytology, human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing, or to conventional cytology within the organised screening programme. Follow-up results on subsequent cervical cancers will become available during 2007-2015.
Large-scale randomised trials are useful to clarify effectiveness and cost-effectiveness issues of the most important technological alternatives in the screening programmes for cervical cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17042938 View in PubMed
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240 records – page 1 of 24.