Skip header and navigation

Refine By

107 records – page 1 of 11.

Aberrant expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncogene is not a common feature in osteosarcoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101871
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Daniel Baumhoer
Jan Smida
Katja Specht
Karin Bink
Leticia Quintanilla-Martinez
Michael Rosemann
Heide Siggelkow
Walter B J Nathrath
Michael J Atkinson
Stefan Bielack
Gernot Jundt
Michaela Nathrath
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basel, 4031 Basel, Switzerland. dbaumhoer@mac.com
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - physiology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Middle Aged
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Osteosarcoma - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptor, erbB-2 - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression in osteosarcoma and its relationship to prognosis have been the subject of several conflicting reports, most of them relying on immunohistochemical studies. Because the urgent need of prognostic markers and effective new treatment options for osteosarcoma patients, we evaluated the role of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in 2 well-characterized sets of pretherapeutic osteosarcoma samples (46 paraffin-embedded and 46 fresh-frozen biopsy samples) using immunohistochemistry with 2 different antibodies [DAKO A0485 (Glostrup, Denmark) and Novocastra CB11 (Newcastle, UK)] as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and SNP array analyses and correlated our findings with clinicopathological parameters. However, our study failed to detect unequivocal evidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene amplification or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 messenger RNA or protein in any of the investigated tumors. Only in a small subset of samples, a moderate increase in messenger RNA levels (13.6%) or focal membranous immunoreactivity (8.7%; A0485) was detected but did not correlate with survival or response to chemotherapy. Cytoplasmic staining was identified more frequently (63%; CB11) but again did not show any association with clinicopathological parameters. In conclusion, our study does not support a role for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 as a prognostic marker in osteosarcoma.
PubMed ID
21292304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormal DNA content predicts the occurrence of carcinomas in non-dysplastic oral white patches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19552
Source
Oral Oncol. 2001 Oct;37(7):558-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Sudbø
T. Ried
M. Bryne
W. Kildal
H. Danielsen
A. Reith
Author Affiliation
Division of Digital Pathology, Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Montebello, Oslo 0310, Norway. jon.sudbo@rh.uio.no
Source
Oral Oncol. 2001 Oct;37(7):558-65
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Image Cytometry - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
Ploidies
Precancerous Conditions - diagnosis - genetics
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
The majority of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are preceded by visible changes in the oral mucosa, most often white patches. Although the histological finding of dysplasia in oral white patches signals increased risk of developing OSCC, this may also occur in non-dysplastic lesions. However, no reliable markers exist to predict the occurrence of OSCC in these patients. From a total of 263 patients diagnosed with oral white patches, biopsies from 45 patients were selected on the criteria that the patients had lesions histologically proven to be non-dysplastic. The lesions were analyzed with respect to their DNA content. The clinical outcome of the patients was known from the Cancer Registry of Norway, and these data were compared to the DNA content of their lesions. Among the 45 patients, five cases (11%) later developed an OSCC. Four of the cases that subsequently developed an OSCC were among the five aneuploid (abnormal) cases (P=0.001). One aneuploid lesion did not develop a carcinoma during a follow-up time of 120 months. The fifth case that subsequently developed an OSCC was diploid (normal), and developed into an OSCC after an observation time of 73 months (P=0.001). In conclusion, aberrant DNA content reliably predicts the occurrence of OSCC in patients that otherwise would be regarded as at very low risk. Normal DNA content indicates low risk.
PubMed ID
11564576 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aggressiveness of screen-detected breast cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215968
Source
Lancet. 1995 Jan 28;345(8944):221-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1995
Author
M. Hakama
K. Holli
J. Isola
O P Kallioniemi
A. Kärkkäinen
T. Visakorpi
E. Pukkala
I. Saarenmaa
U. Geiger
J. Ikkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Lancet. 1995 Jan 28;345(8944):221-4
Date
Jan-28-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - prevention & control
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mammography
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Abstract
It is not clear whether screening for breast cancer works as public health policy and whether early indicators of effect predict an ultimate reduction in mortality. The malignant potentials of 248 breast cancers detected by the screening service in Finland were compared with those of 490 control cancers diagnosed before the screening service was established. Aggressiveness was assessed by DNA flow cytometry and clinical status by cancer size and node involvement. After the first screening round, the results of DNA flow cytometry were the same in cancers diagnosed by screening and in controls; these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the biological aggressiveness of breast cancer remains constant as the cancer progresses. The proportion of patients with node-negative and small T1 cancers after the first screening was higher among the screened population than among controls, indicating earliness of diagnosis among those screened. Cancers diagnosed in the first round had a low malignant potential, as indicated by the DNA flow-cytometry and by clinical stage. Lower aggressiveness of cancers found by screening than of control cancers would indicate overdiagnosis or length-biased sampling, but not earliness of diagnosis. Screening with mammography is practised as a public-health policy in Finland. The results predict that the mortality reduction found in randomised trials can be repeated with a screening service.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):853; author reply 854-57898236
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):854; author reply 854-57898238
Comment In: Lancet. 1995 Apr 1;345(8953):853-4; author reply 854-57898237
PubMed ID
7741862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of the DNA content in the management of thyroid tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25020
Source
Thyroidology. 1991 Jan;3(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
G. Wallin
M. Bäckdahl
G. Auer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Thyroidology. 1991 Jan;3(1):25-9
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aneuploidy
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Thyroid carcinoma is rare and constitutes about 1% of all malignant tumours. For some time it has been known that age, sex, histology, and tumour grade are factors of importance for prognosis. In Stockholm we have analyzed the amount of nuclear DNA in thyroid tumours for the last 10 years. In our studies and those of other nuclear DNA-analysis has given important prognostic information for differentiated thyroid tumours in addition to that provided by histopathology, and may be of value preoperatively for treatment planning. DNA-analysis is well established in our clinical work and is one of the factors considered in a prospective randomized study concerning patients with papillary carcinoma in the Stockholm-Uppsala area. Tumours with diploid nuclear DNA pattern are randomized between lobectomy and total thyroidectomy in this study.
PubMed ID
1726693 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aneuploidy in salivary gland adenomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216258
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T. Atula
R. Grénman
P. Laippala
P J Klemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):395-400
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - genetics - pathology
Adenoma - genetics - pathology - surgery
Adenoma, Pleomorphic - genetics - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneuploidy
Biopsy, Needle
Carcinoma - genetics - pathology
Cell Division
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis - genetics
Diploidy
Female
Finland
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - genetics - pathology
Paraffin Embedding
S Phase
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - genetics - pathology - surgery
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
The occurrence of abnormal nuclear DNA content in major salivary gland adenomas is not well known and its correlation with tumor recurrence has not been documented previously. From 1987 to 1991, 119 consecutive major salivary gland adenomas were operated on at Turku University Central Hospital. These tumors were analyzed by flow cytometry and 100 (84%) were found to be diploid, 12 (10%) near-diploid and 7 (6%) aneuploid with DNA indexes > 1.15. The mean proliferation rate measured as a percentage of cells in the S-phase fraction was 2.5 +/- 1.6%. The histological slides were then blindly reclassified according to current World Health Organization classification. As a result histological classification was changed in 3 tumors: malignant cells were found in 2 aneuploid tumors and 1 diploid neoplasm. Preoperative cytological fine-needle aspiration biopsy had been considered as possibly malignant in 2 of these cases. Among all case material 10 specimens were recurrent tumors; although the tendency to recur depended on the extent and adequacy of the surgery performed, multiple recurrences were associated with non-diploid tumors.
PubMed ID
8562033 View in PubMed
Less detail

The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele is no risk factor for prostate cancer in the Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19436
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Nov 2;85(9):1418
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2001

Application of fine-needle aspiration to the demonstration of ERBB2 and MYC expression by in situ hybridization in breast carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23646
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 1994 Jun;42(6):795-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
Y. Soini
A. Mannermaa
R. Winqvist
D. Kamel
K. Poikonen
H. Kiviniemi
P. Pääkkö
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 1994 Jun;42(6):795-803
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy, Needle - methods
Breast Neoplasms - genetics - pathology - surgery
Cell Line
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Gene Expression
Genes, myc
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute
Lymph Node Excision
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphocytes - pathology
Metaphase
Middle Aged
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - analysis - biosynthesis
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc - analysis - biosynthesis
Proto-Oncogenes
RNA, Messenger - analysis - biosynthesis
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor - analysis - biosynthesis
Receptor, erbB-2
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Thirteen consecutive fine-needle aspirates of breast carcinoma and five selected breast tumor cell lines were analyzed for ERBB2 and MYC mRNA expression by in situ hybridization. To compare the level of mRNA synthesis with those of gene amplification and oncoprotein synthesis, all tumors were also analyzed by Southern blot analysis, and for ERBB2 also by immunohistochemistry. Expression of ERBB2 mRNA was observed in eight tumors. MYC expression was observed in all tumors studied. Three tumor cell lines expressed both ERBB2 and MYC (SK-BR-3, HeLa, HT-29) and two only MYC (SK-LU-1, HL-60). Only one tumor showed amplification of ERBB2 and two of MYC. In all three cases there was a considerable increase in corresponding mRNA synthesis as detected by in situ hybridization. By immunohistochemistry, four cases showed either patchy areas or uniformly distributed, membrane-bound ERBB2 immunoreactivity. All except one case showed increased ERBB2 mRNA synthesis. There was a clear association between the quantity of ERBB2 mRNA and oncoprotein expression. The results show that in situ hybridization of fine-needle aspiration material is a sensitive method to detect increased expression of the ERBB2 and MYC oncogenes in breast carcinoma. Furthermore, this study indicates that in a majority of cases some other mechanism that gene amplification appears responsible for the increased gene expression. It is also possible that Southern blot analysis is not a sensitive enough method to detect gene amplifications in the heterogeneous breast tumors, which usually also contain stromal tissue. The fact that not all cases with elevated ERBB2 mRNA synthesis were immunohistochemically positive suggests that either immunohistochemistry (after fixation with 10% formalin) is a less sensitive method than in situ hybridization to detect abnormal gene expression or that there are cases in which the oncoprotein synthesis is for some reason depressed, even though there is an increase in gene transcription.
PubMed ID
7910618 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH gene mutations and colorectal cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177604
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Nov 3;96(21):1631-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2004
Author
Marina E Croitoru
Sean P Cleary
Nando Di Nicola
Michael Manno
Teresa Selander
Melyssa Aronson
Mark Redston
Michelle Cotterchio
Julia Knight
Robert Gryfe
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Nov 3;96(21):1631-4
Date
Nov-3-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - genetics
Aspartic Acid
Base Pair Mismatch
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis - genetics
Cysteine
DNA Glycosylases - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germ-Line Mutation
Glycine
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity
Ontario - epidemiology
Phenotype
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics
Tyrosine
Abstract
The MutY human homologue (MYH) gene encodes a member of the base excision repair pathway that is involved in repairing oxidative damage to DNA. Two germline MYH gene mutations that result in Myh proteins containing amino acid substitutions Y165C and G382D (hereafter called the Y165C and G382D mutations) are associated with adenomatous poly-posis and colorectal cancer among patients from several European poly-posis registries. We used a population-based series of 1238 colorectal cancer patients and 1255 healthy control subjects from Ontario, Canada, to examine the risk of colorectal cancer among biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH Y165C and G382D mutation carriers. The entire MYH gene coding region was screened in all MYH Y165C and G382D mutation carriers. Compared with noncarriers, biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH gene mutation carriers had an increased risk of colorectal cancer and were more likely to have first-or second-degree relatives with colorectal cancer (relative risk = 1.54, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 2.16). The increased risk of colorectal cancer in biallelic and monoallelic MYH gene mutation carriers was not consistently associated with the development of multiple adenomatous polyps. Loss of heterozygosity in at least one of four loci in MYH was detected in eight (47%) of 17 colorectal tumors from monoallelic MYH gene mutation carriers but in only two (20%) of 10 colorectal tumors from biallelic MYH gene mutation carriers. These two MYH gene mutations may account for a substantial fraction of hereditary colorectal cancer.
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 16;97(4):320-1; author reply 321-215713969
PubMed ID
15523092 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association studies of estrogen receptor polymorphisms in a Norwegian testicular cancer population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23297
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Mar;4(2):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
K. Heimdal
T I Andersen
M. Skrede
S D Fosså
K. Berg
A L Børresen
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Mar;4(2):123-6
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Cryptorchidism - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germinoma - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Infertility, Male - genetics
Linkage (Genetics) - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Receptors, Estrogen - genetics
Seminoma - genetics - metabolism
Testicular Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism
Variation (Genetics) - genetics
Abstract
To examine a possible influence of estrogen receptor variants on the genetic susceptibility to germ cell cancer we have analyzed the allelic frequencies of three polymorphisms within the estrogen receptor gene in testicular cancer (n = 454) and control populations (n = 672). There were no differences in allelic frequencies in cancer patients compared to controls. Subgroup analyses did not indicate differences in allele frequencies for any of the polymorphisms in those individuals most likely to be predisposed to testicular cancer (patients with a history of maldescent of testicles and/or infertility, patients suffering from bilateral testicular cancer, and patients with familial testicular cancer). The data do not indicate that variation in the 5' end of the estrogen receptor gene confers susceptibility to testicular cancer.
PubMed ID
7742719 View in PubMed
Less detail

BRCA2, but not BRCA1, mutations account for familial ovarian cancer in Iceland: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17340
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Dec;40(18):2788-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Thorunn Rafnar
Kristrun R Benediktsdottir
Bjarki J Eldon
Thorgeir Gestsson
Hafsteinn Saemundsson
Karl Olafsson
Anna Salvarsdottir
Eirikur Steingrimsson
Steinunn Thorlacius
Author Affiliation
Iceland Genomics Corporation, Snorrabraut 60, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland. thorunnr@uvs.is
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Dec;40(18):2788-93
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genotype
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Pedigree
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A single founder mutation in each of the BRCA genes has been identified in Iceland. The frequency of the BRCA1 G5193A and BRCA2 999del5 mutations in all ovarian cancer patients diagnosed over the period 1991-2000 was determined. Mutation status was correlated with family history, tumour morphology and age at diagnosis. Samples from 86% of cases (179 carcinomas and 74 borderline tumours) were available. In the carcinomas, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were present in 1.2% and 6% of cases, respectively. No BRCA mutations were found in the borderline tumours. Odds Ratio (OR) of developing ovarian cancer was 20.65 for BRCA2 carriers. Family history of breast/ovarian cancer was present for 70% of BRCA2 carriers and approximately 14% for non-carriers with carcinoma. In conclusion, BRCA2 999del5 is present in 6% of ovarian cancer cases in Iceland and is associated with a 20-fold increase in the risk of the disease. The BRCA1 G5193A mutation is too rare to contribute significantly to ovarian cancer in Iceland.
PubMed ID
15571962 View in PubMed
Less detail

107 records – page 1 of 11.