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Abscess disease, caseous lymphadenitis, and pulmonary adenomatosis in imported sheep.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20491
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Feb;47(1):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
K. Møller
J S Agerholm
P. Ahrens
N E Jensen
T K Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Danish Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Feb;47(1):55-62
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Animals
DNA Primers - chemistry
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Lymph Nodes - microbiology - pathology
Lymphadenitis - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Staphylococcus aureus - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The occurrence of abscess disease, caseous lymphadenitis, and pulmonary adenomatosis in sheep in Denmark is reported for the first time. Subcutaneous abscesses were observed in imported 4- to 5-month-old lambs of the Lacaune breed 10 days after arrival in Denmark. Abscesses were mostly located in the head, neck and shoulder regions close to the regional lymph nodes. Bacteriological examinations revealed growth of Staphylococcus aureus ssp. anaerobius in all animals with subcutaneously located abscesses containing a viscous white-yellow odourless mass. In addition, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was isolated from abscesses in one animal and lesions consistent with pulmonary adenomatosis were found in four animals.
PubMed ID
10780173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterisation of streptomycin resistance determinants in Danish isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10433
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2000 Jul 3;75(1):73-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-2000
Author
L. Madsen
F M Aarestrup
J E Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Stigboejlen 4, DK 1870 C, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2000 Jul 3;75(1):73-82
Date
Jul-3-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blotting, Southern - veterinary
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Conjugation, Genetic - genetics
DNA Primers - chemistry
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Microbial - genetics
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel - veterinary
Humans
Nucleotidyltransferases - chemistry - genetics
Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor) - chemistry - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmonella Infections, Animal - drug therapy
Salmonella typhimurium - chemistry - drug effects - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Streptomycin - pharmacology
Swine
Swine Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Variation (Genetics) - genetics
Abstract
Fifty six Danish streptomycin (Sm) resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from pigs (n=34), calves (n=3) and humans (n=19) were characterised with respect to co-resistances (14 drugs), transferability of Sm-resistance by conjugation, genetic determinants encoding Sm-resistance and diversity with respect to localisation of genes in the genome and DNA-sequences. Forty-six strains carried resistance(s) other than Sm-resistance. Nineteen different co-resistance patterns were observed and tetracycline was the most commonly observed resistance in these patterns. In 22 of the strains, Sm-resistance was transferred by conjugation. Eleven strains contained the gene aadA only, six strains contained aadA+strA+strB, and 35 strains contained strA+strB. Partial sequences of aadA were obtained from four strains. Three strains showed identical sequences to a published aadA sequence from the transposon Tn7, and in one strain the sequence showed one synonymous substitution compared to this sequence. Partial sequences were obtained of strA and strB in seven strains. The sequence of strB was identical to the published sequence of the plasmid RSF1010 in all strains. All seven sequences of strA were identical and differed from the sequence of strA in RSF1010 by two non-synonymous substitutions.
PubMed ID
10865153 View in PubMed
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Characterization of bacterial community associated with phytoplankton bloom in a eutrophic lake in South Norway using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequence analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285365
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(3):e0173408
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Niranjan Nitin Parulekar
Pandurang Kolekar
Andrew Jenkins
Synne Kleiven
Hans Utkilen
Anette Johansen
Sangeeta Sawant
Urmila Kulkarni-Kale
Mohan Kale
Mona Sæbø
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(3):e0173408
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Cyanobacteria - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification - metabolism
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Lakes - microbiology
Microcystins - analysis
Microcystis - genetics - metabolism
Norway
Phytoplankton - genetics - growth & development
Proteobacteria - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Interactions between different phytoplankton taxa and heterotrophic bacterial communities within aquatic environments can differentially support growth of various heterotrophic bacterial species. In this study, phytoplankton diversity was studied using traditional microscopic techniques and the bacterial communities associated with phytoplankton bloom were studied using High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the V1-V3 and V3-V4 hypervariable regions. Samples were collected from Lake Akersvannet, a eutrophic lake in South Norway, during the growth season from June to August 2013. Microscopic examination revealed that the phytoplankton community was mostly represented by Cyanobacteria and the dinoflagellate Ceratium hirundinella. The HTS results revealed that Proteobacteria (Alpha, Beta, and Gamma), Bacteriodetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia dominated the bacterial community, with varying relative abundances throughout the sampling season. Species level identification of Cyanobacteria showed a mixed population of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa and Woronichinia naegeliana. A significant proportion of the microbial community was composed of unclassified taxa which might represent locally adapted freshwater bacterial groups. Comparison of cyanobacterial species composition from HTS and microscopy revealed quantitative discrepancies, indicating a need for cross validation of results. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses HTS methods for studying the bacterial community associated with phytoplankton blooms in a Norwegian lake. The study demonstrates the value of considering results from multiple methods when studying bacterial communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28282404 View in PubMed
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Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum sp. nov., novel slowly growing, scotochromogenic clinical isolates related to Mycobacterium simiae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178240
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2004 Sep;54(Pt 5):1543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
C Y Turenne
V J Cook
T V Burdz
R J Pauls
L. Thibert
J N Wolfe
A. Kabani
Author Affiliation
National Reference Centre for Mycobacteriology, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. cturenne@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2004 Sep;54(Pt 5):1543-51
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - microbiology
Canada
Cervix Uteri - microbiology
Chaperonin 60
Chaperonins - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - isolation & purification
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer - chemistry - isolation & purification
Female
Genes, rRNA
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Mycobacterium Infections - microbiology
Mycobacterium scrofulaceum - classification
Mycolic Acids - analysis
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - physiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sputum - microbiology
Abstract
A group of pigmented, slowly growing mycobacteria identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as 'MCRO 33' (GenBank accession no. AF152559) have been isolated from several clinical specimens in various laboratories across Canada. Genotypically, the organism is most closely related to Mycobacterium simiae. However, it presents with a similar phenotypic profile to Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. Several reference strains obtained from ATCC and TMC culture collections, previously identified as M. scrofulaceum or M. simiae, have also been found to possess the MCRO 33 16S rRNA gene sequence. Biochemical testing, susceptibility testing, HPLC, hsp65 gene and 16S-23S spacer (ITS1) sequencing were performed on clinical and reference strains to characterize further this unique species. Of the clinical strains, one was isolated from a cervix biopsy whereas all other clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples. In one patient, symptoms, imaging and repeat clinical specimens positive on culture for this organism were suggestive of active clinical disease. The description of this species, for which the name Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum sp. nov. is proposed, follows the present trend of a large number of novel Mycobacterium species identified due in great part to sequence-based methods. The type strain is HSC68T (= ATCC BAA-614T = DSM 44648T).
PubMed ID
15388708 View in PubMed
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Rapid combined characterization of microorganism and host genotypes using a single technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17801
Source
Helicobacter. 2004 Apr;9(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Sandra Hjalmarsson
Anders Alderborn
Caroline Fock
Ingrid Muldin
Helene Kling
Mathias Uhlén
Lars Engstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Bacteriology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Helicobacter. 2004 Apr;9(2):138-45
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Biopsy
Clarithromycin - pharmacology
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - isolation & purification
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - isolation & purification
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Gastric Mucosa - chemistry
Genes, Bacterial
Genes, rRNA
Genomic Islands - genetics
Genotype
Helicobacter Infections - genetics - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 23S - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Virulence - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Genetic information is becoming increasingly important in diagnosis and prognosis of infectious diseases. In this study we investigated the possibility of using a single technology, the Pyrosequencing trade mark technology (Biotage AB, Uppsala, Sweden), to gather several kinds of important genetic information from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, as well as from the carrier of the H. pylori infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA from 87 clinical isolates of H. pylori, 50 isolates from H. pylori-infected transgenic mice and nine gastric biopsies from H. pylori-infected patients was analyzed for targets in the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes to determine species identity, clarithromycin susceptibility and virulence level, respectively. In addition, three single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human interleukin-1B (IL-1B) gene, reported to affect the risk of developing gastric cancer, were analyzed in the gastric biopsy samples. RESULTS: All DNA targets were processed and analyzed in parallel, enabling convenient genetic characterization of both pathogen and host. All genotypes were easily and accurately assigned. In the 16S rRNA analysis, 99.83% of the bases were correctly called. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that genetic analysis using Pyrosequencing trade mark technology was nonlaborious, and gave highly accurate data for different kinds of target. We therefore believe that this technology has the potential to complement or in the future substitute the time-consuming traditional microbial identification and typing methods, as well as enabling rapid typing of relevant host genetic markers.
PubMed ID
15068415 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.