Skip header and navigation

Refine By

62 records – page 1 of 7.

2001 serological survey in the Czech Republic--poliomyelitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180596
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;11 Suppl:S31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
I. Matyásová
P. Rainetová
J. Cástková
Author Affiliation
Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology, NRL for Enteroviruses, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. matyasova@szu.cz
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;11 Suppl:S31-5
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Data Collection
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Poliomyelitis - blood - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Poliovirus - immunology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - administration & dosage
Serologic Tests
Abstract
Regular vaccination against poliomyelitis was started in 1960 with oral polio vaccine (OPV). Since 1992 a trivalent OPV has been administered in five doses within a nationwide vaccination campaign. The immunization coverage varies between 96.8% and 98.2% after 4 OPV doses, reaching 98.0% to 98.9% after the fifth dose. No case of indigenous poliomyelitis has been reported in the Czech Republic since the second half of 1960. In 2001, 3,230 sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against poliovirus of types 1, 2 and 3 using a virus neutralization microassay. The prevalence rates of antibodies vary between 96.0% and 100% for types 1 and 2 and between 95.1% and 100% for type 3, with the exception of the highest age group, in which the prevalence rates of antibodies against poliovirus of all three types are 92.2%.
PubMed ID
15080257 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accident-related mortality in 5- to 9-year-old children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34521
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1996 Dec 18;135(24):786-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-1996
Author
A. Syrovátka
L. Pelech
V. Tosovský
Z. Roth
Author Affiliation
Státní zdravotní ústav, Praha.
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1996 Dec 18;135(24):786-8
Date
Dec-18-1996
Language
Czech
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Austria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Czech Republic - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: According to the WHO, insufficient attention is devoted to the problem of accident while more than one half of the death in children of 1 to 14 years of age in industrialized countries are caused by accidents. METHODS AND RESULTS: Nationwide statistical data from the Czech Republic have been evaluated and compared with those of selected European countries and the USA. In the years 1991-1993 average of 151 children died in the Czech Republic in the age group of 5- to 9-year olds. In 68 of them the cause of death was an injury that in almost half of the cases was due to a traffic accident. The trend in the mortality of children of the same age was assessed comparing the averages for 1950-1952 and 1991-1993. The overall mortality decreased by 68% while the greatest decline was in non-accident causes (75%). Mortality due to accidents decreased by 55% and that caused by motor vehicles by only 19%. The lowest mortality due to accidents was found in Sweden. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that mortality due to accidents and poisonings in younger school children in the Czech Republic is higher than, e.g. in Austria and Sweden. In order to be able to elaborate a draft of appropriate and effective preventive measures, it is necessary to obtain further information on accidents and poisonings in children that have not ended fatally.
PubMed ID
9072296 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AdHOC Study of older adults' adherence to medication in 11 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171755
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Claudia Cooper
Iain Carpenter
Cornelius Katona
Marianne Schroll
Cordula Wagner
Daniela Fialova
Gill Livingston
Author Affiliation
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Dept. of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, Archway Campus, Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5NL, UK.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Demography
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Authors investigated, cross-nationally, the factors, including demographic, psychiatric (including cognitive), physical, and behavioral, determining whether older people take their prescribed medication. Older adults are prescribed more medication than any other group, and poor adherence is a common reason for non-response to medication.
Researchers interviewed 3,881 people over age 65 who receive home care services in 11 countries, administering a structured interview in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was the percentage of participants not adherent to medication.
In all, 12.5% of people (N=456) reported that they were not fully adherent to medication. Non-adherence was predicted by problem drinking (OR=3.6), not having a doctor review their medication (OR=3.3), greater cognitive impairment (OR=1.4 for every one-point increase in impairment), good physical health (OR=1.2), resisting care (OR=2.1), being unmarried (OR=2.3), and living in the Czech Republic (OR=4.7) or Germany (OR=1.4).
People who screen positive for problem drinking and who have dementia (often undiagnosed) are less likely to adhere to medication. Therefore, doctors should consider dementia and problem drinking when prescribing for older adults. Interventions to improve adherence in older adults might be more effective if targeted at these groups. It is possible that medication-review enhances adherence by improving the doctor-patient relationship or by emphasizing the need for medications.
PubMed ID
16319299 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and physical functioning among middle-aged and older adults in Central and Eastern Europe: results from the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265251
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Jan;44(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Yaoyue Hu
Hynek Pikhart
Sofia Malyutina
Andrzej Pajak
Ruzena Kubinova
Yuri Nikitin
Anne Peasey
Michael Marmot
Martin Bobak
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Jan;44(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Protective factors
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
light-to-moderate drinking is apparently associated with a decreased risk of physical limitations in middle-aged and older adults.
to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and physical limitations in Eastern European populations.
a cross-sectional survey of 28,783 randomly selected residents (45-69 years) in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and seven towns of Czech Republic.
physical limitations were defined as
Notes
Cites: Stat Med. 2011 Feb 20;30(4):377-9921225900
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Oct;57(10):1767-7519737328
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):441-419594799
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2009;60:549-7618652544
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Feb;55(2):212-2017302657
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Jan;55(1):49-5717233685
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:25517049075
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Sep;54(9):1341-716970640
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Feb;48(4):445-6910075171
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Dec 3;2(8623):1267-732904004
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Oct 12;252(14):1905-76471323
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Oct 2;329(7469):76715377571
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-4214966239
Cites: Addiction. 2003 Sep;98(9):1209-2812930209
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Nov 9;360(9344):1448-5412433511
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Sep;50(9):1525-3412383150
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2001 Jul;53(1):29-4011380160
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Dec 15;25(24):3130-911124729
Cites: J Intern Med. 1999 Oct;246(4):331-4010583704
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Dec;108(12):2051-723297738
Cites: Addiction. 2013 Nov;108(11):1905-1423692519
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:37821605473
Cites: J Aging Health. 2011 Aug;23(5):806-2121311049
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1401-1022039198
PubMed ID
24982097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant vitamin intake and mortality in three Central and Eastern European urban populations: the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278739
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Urszula Stepaniak
Agnieszka Micek
Giuseppe Grosso
Denes Stefler
Roman Topor-Madry
Ruzena Kubinova
Sofia Malyutina
Anne Peasey
Hynek Pikhart
Yuri Nikitin
Martin Bobak
Andrzej Pajak
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Poland - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between individual-level dietary intakes of antioxidant vitamins C, E and beta-carotene with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in three Central and Eastern European (CEE) populations.
Data from the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe cohort study were used. At the baseline survey, between 2002 and 2005, 28,945 men and women aged 45-69 years were examined in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and seven Czech towns. Deaths in the cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between vitamin consumption and all-cause, cardiovascular (CVD) disease and cancer mortality.
In multivariable-adjusted analyses, there were no clear inverse associations between antioxidant vitamin intakes and mortality, although in some groups, several hazard ratios (HRs) were significant. For example, in men, compared with the lowest quintile of vitamin C intake, all-cause mortality in the third and fourth quintiles was lower by 28 % (HR 0.72; 95 % CI 0.61-0.85) and by 20 % (HR 0.80; 95 % CI 0.68-0.95), respectively. CVD mortality was lower by 35 % (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.50-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.59-0.99) in third and fourth quintile of vitamin C intake, respectively. In women, the third and fourth quintiles of dietary intake of vitamin E were associated with reduced risk of all-cause death by 33 % (HR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.53-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.61-0.97), respectively. Consumption of vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene was not related to CVD mortality in women and to cancer mortality in either gender.
This large prospective cohort study in CEE populations with low prevalence of vitamin supplementation did not find a strong, dose-response evidence for protective effects of antioxidant vitamin intake.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Apr;29(2):260-510817122
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Oct;17(10):2278-8623987990
Cites: Nutrition. 2000 Sep;16(9):785-610978865
Cites: J Nutr. 2002 Apr;132(4):756-6111925473
Cites: J Intern Med. 2002 May;251(5):372-9211982737
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2002 Aug;61(3):397-40012230799
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2003 Feb;22(1):18-3512569111
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;77(6):1390-912791615
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):999-101014594788
Cites: Lancet. 2004 May 22;363(9422):1724-715158637
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 May 20;328(20):1444-98479463
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1994 Sep 21;86(18):1390-78072032
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Dec 15;142(12):1269-787503047
Cites: Radiat Res. 1996 May;145(5):532-418619018
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 1;144(5):501-118781466
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1220S-1228S; discussion 1229S-1231S9094926
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 15;160(12):1223-3315583375
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1508-2015585762
Cites: Free Radic Res. 2005 Jul;39(7):671-8616036346
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:25517049075
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun;85(6):1634-4217556703
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2008;23(1):3-1017955332
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Feb;138(2):344-5018203902
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2008 May;47 Suppl 2:3-1818458831
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:43919951409
Cites: Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2009;60(3):275-820063699
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102 Suppl 1:S10-3720100364
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2011 Mar 1;128(5):1169-7820473915
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2011 Jan;105(1):123-3220807458
Cites: Stroke. 2011 Jun;42(6):1665-7221512181
Cites: Curr Aging Sci. 2011 Jul;4(2):158-7021235492
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 2011 Sep 1;51(5):1000-1321664268
Cites: Ann Agric Environ Med. 2012;19(2):181-9222742786
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2012 Sep;51(6):637-6322684631
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):824-4022995736
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):706-2123638931
Cites: Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2013;18:1017-2923747864
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e6585623762441
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e7455824040282
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):297-30324227051
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:83184124804252
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Dec;68(12):1346-5225028084
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Aug;72(2):476-8310919944
PubMed ID
25762013 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between psychosocial characteristics at work and problem drinking: a cross-sectional study of men in three Eastern European urban populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173621
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Aug;62(8):546-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
M. Bobak
H. Pikhart
R. Kubinova
S. Malyutina
A. Pajak
H. Sebakova
R. Topor-Madry
Y. Nikitin
W. Caan
M. Marmot
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Health and Society, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK. m.bobak@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Aug;62(8):546-50
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Employment - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Reward
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace
Abstract
Psychosocial factors at work are thought to influence health partly through health behaviours.
To examine the association between effort-reward imbalance and job control and several alcohol related measures in three eastern European populations.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), and Karvina (Czech Republic). The participants completed a questionnaire that included effort-reward at work, job control, and a number of sociodemographic variables. Annual alcohol intake, annual number of drinking sessions, the mean dose of alcohol per drinking session, and binge drinking (> or =80 g of ethanol in one session at least once a week) were based on graduated frequencies in the questionnaire. Data were also available on problem drinking (> or =2 positive answers on CAGE questionnaire) and negative social consequences of drinking. All male participants in full employment (n = 694) were included in the present analyses.
After controlling for age and centre, all indices of alcohol consumption and problem drinking were associated with the effort-reward ratio. Adjustment for material deprivation did not change the results but adjustment for depressive symptoms reduced the estimated effects. Job control was not associated with any of the alcohol related outcomes.
The imbalance of effort-reward at work is associated with increased alcohol intake and problem drinking. The association appears to be partly mediated by depressive symptoms, which might be either an antecedent or a consequence of men's drinking behaviour.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 1995 Apr;90(4):499-5137773113
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Feb;58(2):131-514729894
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2004 Jan-Feb;39(1):64-914691077
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2003;10(2):125-4212763706
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Nov 9;360(9344):1448-5412433511
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Sep;55(9):624-3011511640
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2001 Apr;27(2):146-5311409598
Cites: BMJ. 2001 May 19;322(7296):1233-611358781
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct;29(5):785-9211034957
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):328-3210814651
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1995 Jun;19(3):647-557573788
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):324-318604756
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):332-408604757
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Apr;51(2):167-719196646
Cites: Epidemiology. 1998 Jan;9(1):43-79430267
Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 1996 Jan;1(1):27-419547031
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Feb;52(2):93-1009578855
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1998 Jan;88(1):68-749584036
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998 Jun;22(4):921-79660323
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Jun;24(3):197-2059710372
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1999 Mar;60(2):203-810091958
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 May;56(5):302-710472303
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(10):1127-342274801
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Aug;87(8):1173-831511230
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Oct;78(10):1336-423421392
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Aug;78(8):910-83389427
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Oct 12;252(14):1905-76471323
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Jul;71(7):694-7057246835
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Aug;99(8):1034-4115265100
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2004 Mar;61(3):219-2414985516
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-4214966239
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1483-9914759692
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1475-8214759691
PubMed ID
16046607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between year of birth and cognitive functions in Russia and the Czech Republic: cross-sectional results of the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149435
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;33(3):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Martin Bobak
Marcus Richards
Sofia Malyutina
Ruzena Kubinova
Anne Peasey
Hynek Pikhart
Sergei Shishkin
Yuri Nikitin
Michael Marmot
Author Affiliation
MRC Unit for Lifelong Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. m.bobak@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;33(3):231-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Cognition - physiology
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychology
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess differences in cognitive functions by year of birth in Russia and the Czech Republic.
A cross-sectional study in the general population of Novosibirsk (Russia) and 6 cities of the Czech Republic recruited random samples of men and women (3,874 Russians, 3,626 Czechs) aged 45-69 years in 2002 (i.e. born in 1933-1957). Word recall, verbal fluency (number of animals named in 1 min) and letter search were assessed in a clinic.
Except letter search in men, we found similar levels of cognitive functioning in Russians and Czechs in the youngest subjects and a steeper association of functioning with year of birth in Russia than in the Czech Republic. For example, the difference in the mean word recall, associated with 10 years difference in year of birth, was 0.9 (SE 0.06) words in Russian men, compared to 0.4 (0.06) words in Czech men; in women, these figures were 0.8 (0.05) and 0.3 (0.05), respectively. For all outcomes, except letter search in men, the interactions between year of birth and country were statistically highly significant, and the differences in the year of birth effects between countries were largely unexplained by socioeconomic indicators and risk factors.
The slope of association between lower cognitive functioning and earlier year of birth is much steeper in Russia than in the Czech Republic. Given that poor cognitive functioning is a risk factor for dementia, long-term follow-up of this cohort and other studies into population rates of cognitive impairment in Russia should be a priority.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 1993 Mar;31(3):247-638450681
Cites: Ethn Dis. 2007 Winter;17(1):40-817274208
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Oct 2;329(7469):76715377571
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2004 Jun;16(2):129-4015318760
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Mar 6;328(7439):55214761906
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-4214966239
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2003;81(11):778-8714758403
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr 15;157(8):712-2012697575
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2002 Jan;57(1):S43-5111773232
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;16(12):1143-811748773
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Apr;62(4):351-718339829
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:25517049075
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2006 Sep;13(9):990-516930366
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 May;96(5):826-3316380565
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2005 Oct;58(4):617-2216178025
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2005 Sep;15(8):572-816118001
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Mar 11;279(10):793-8009508159
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 15;338(3):171-99428819
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Lancet. 1997 Aug 9;350(9075):383-89259651
Cites: BMJ. 2007 May 12;334(7601):99017468119
Cites: Trends Cogn Sci. 2007 Aug;11(8):342-817629545
Cites: Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Nov-Dec;19(6):836-4317696141
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2007 Sep;48(3):223-3817982865
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2007 Nov;62(6):S404-1418079429
PubMed ID
19641328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Binge drinking and blood pressure: cross-sectional results of the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113128
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e65856
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Andrzej Pajak
Krystyna Szafraniec
Ruzena Kubinova
Sofia Malyutina
Anne Peasey
Hynek Pikhart
Yuri Nikitin
Michael Marmot
Martin Bobak
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e65856
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Beverages
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Diastole - physiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Systole - physiology
Abstract
To investigate whether binge drinking pattern influences blood pressure independently from drinking volume or whether it modifies the effect of volume of drinking.
We used cross-sectional data from population samples of 7559 men and 7471 women aged 45-69 years in 2002-05, not on antihypertensive medication, from Russia, Poland and Czech Republic. Annual alcohol intake, drinking frequency and binge drinking (= 100 g in men and = 60 g in women in one session at least once a month) were estimated from graduated frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was analysed as continuous variables (systolic and diastolic pressure) and a binary outcome (= 140/90 mm Hg).
In men, annual alcohol intake and drinking frequency were strongly associated with blood pressure. The odds ratio of high blood pressure for binge drinking in men was 1.62 (95% CI 1.45-1.82) after controlling for age, country, body mass index, education and smoking; additional adjustment for annual alcohol intake reduced it to 1.20 (1.03-1.39). In women, the fully adjusted odds ratio of high blood pressure for binge drinking was 1.31 (1.05-1.63). Binge drinking did not modify the effect of annual alcohol intake. Consuming alcohol as wine, beer or spirits had similar effects.
The results suggest that the independent long-term effect of binge drinking was modest, that binge drinking did not modify the effect of alcohol intake, and that different alcoholic beverages had similar effects on blood pressure.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 1999 May;94(5):649-6310563030
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2010 Sep;23(9):994-920489685
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):328-3210814651
Cites: Hypertension. 2001 May;37(5):1242-5011358935
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2001 Aug;7(3):138-4711509844
Cites: Hypertension. 2001 Nov;38(5):1112-711711507
Cites: Hypertension. 2001 Dec 1;38(6):1361-611751718
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2002 May-Jun;37(3):282-812003919
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Jan 9;348(2):109-1812519921
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1287-9612639233
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-4214966239
Cites: Prev Med. 1982 Jul;11(4):391-4027122431
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1985 Mar-Apr;9(2):125-303890591
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1987 Dec;16(4):520-73501987
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 1991 Apr;5(2):59-671677046
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1991;44(11):1223-311941017
Cites: BMJ. 1994 May 14;308(6939):1263-77802765
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1994 Mar;7(3):249-548003276
Cites: J Hypertens. 1998 Feb;16(2):165-749535143
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998 Apr;22(2 Suppl):4S-14S9603301
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1998 Aug;91(8):402-79816353
Cites: Hypertension. 1999 Jan;33(1):79-829931085
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Dec;44(6):813-915477381
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2006 May;67(3):421-816608152
Cites: J Hypertens. 2006 Aug;24(8):1489-9216877949
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:25517049075
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Apr;36(2):458-6717251244
Cites: Hypertension. 2008 Apr;51(4):1080-718259032
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Mar 4;5(3):e5218318597
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 May-Jun;43(3):351-918245818
Cites: Kardiologiia. 2008;48(8):4-818789003
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Oct;93(10):3833-818628524
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Dec;21(12):1310-718927544
Cites: Stroke. 2008 Dec;39(12):3179-8418832741
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Nov;32(11):1984-9118782342
Cites: Rev Esp Cardiol. 2009 Jun;62(6):603-519480755
Cites: Rev Esp Cardiol. 2009 Jun;62(6):633-4119480759
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Mar 15;171(6):633-4420142394
Cites: Addiction. 1999 Jun;94(6):857-6610665075
PubMed ID
23762441 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Blood Lipid Parameters In Populations of Russia, Poland And Czech Republic: The Hapiee Study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269010
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(5):34-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Yu P Nikitin
K V Makarenkova
S K Malyutina
A. Pajak
R. Kubinova
A. Peasey
M. Bobak
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(5):34-9
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Poland - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
to analyze population values of blood lipid parameters in general populations of Russia, Poland and Czech Republic.
In the frame of international project HAPIEE representative samples of general population were examined in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and six centers in the Czech Republic. The analysis included data of 25,469 men and women aged 45-69 years old.
The average levels of total cholesterol (TC), non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were found relatively high in all centers, though average levels of blood triglycerides (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were within "normal" range. In Novosibirsk mean levels of blood TC and LDL-C in persons of both sexes were obtained the highest among the study participants: 6.3 mmol/ and 4.1 mmol/l, respectively (p
PubMed ID
26615622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can increased use of ART retrieve the Czech Republic from the low fertility trap?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98496
Source
Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2009;30(6):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jirina Kocourkova
Tomas Fait
Author Affiliation
Department of Demography and Geodemography, Faculty of Science, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. koc@natur.cuni.cz
Source
Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2009;30(6):739-48
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Contraception - utilization
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - therapy
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - utilization
Risk factors
Triplets
Twins
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of increased use of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) for the fertility trends in the Czech Republic. DATA AND METHODS: Comparative analysis based on demographic and ART data was used. Demographic data have been published by EUROSTAT and the Czech Statistical Office. ART data have collected by ESHRE. FINDINGS: In the 1990s a trend towards later childbearing contributed greatly to the decline in total fertility rate (TFR) in the Czech Republic. Recently, recuperation of delayed births has resulted in the increase of TFR to 1.5 children per woman which is considered to be a critical minimum level. The highest increase in fertility rates occurred in the age group of 35-39, in which the contribution of ART treatments usually is greatest. Moreover, a substantial increase of multiple births has been registered. In 2005 the estimated share of children born after ART in the Czech Republic (3%) was close to countries with the highest share (Nordic countries, Belgium or Slovenia). However, the Czech Republic registered only half the number of ART cycles per million inhabitants than in those countries. Contrary to Nordic countries the Czech Republic faced an extremely low TFR of 1.28 children per woman. As the estimation of average number of cycles suggests, the need for fertility treatment has not been met in the Czech Republic yet. Moreover, due to the continuous postponement of childbearing to higher women s age, demand for ART treatment will be even higher in the near future and will probably result in the need of more than 2 500 cycles per million inhabitants in the Czech Republic. CONCLUSIONS: Spreading of ART is particularly relevant in the countries caught in the low fertility trap as higher impact on fertility trends could be expected. In the Czech Republic there is a chance to get over the critical level of TFR if comprehensive population policy including the improved access to ART based on well-considered strategy with explicit aim to optimize the quality of health care was accepted. However, from the demographic perspective the risk of further delay of childbearing encouraged by ART treatment should be taken into account while making these decisions.
PubMed ID
20038934 View in PubMed
Less detail

62 records – page 1 of 7.